Valve’s In-Home Streaming Available to Everyone

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maleficarus™

Not really sure why so many here are having a hard time with this feature? Most people only have one up to date PC in there house. Then usually the kids gets the hand-me-down parts that are usually a few years old. Well, these are the PC's that are struggling with newer games. Now, what steam has done is simply allowing streaming any game from the main powerful PC to all the other low-end PC's in the house without running out and buying new parts for each of the kids.

Now it doesn't take a rocket scientist to see how great this is for all those family's on a set monthly budget! Everyone is not rich with the ability to run out and buy $500 VGA cards every month...

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acidic

That is true but it also ties up the rig doing the grunt work. Plus if you can't afford to have 2 decent machines, you aren't going to be able to afford the additional energy costs.

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jbitzer

WHAT? the 45 cents a month is going to kill your budget?

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acidic

go play victim and tattle some more. let the grown ups talk.

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jbitzer

Aww, boo hoo, my repulsive personal attack filled diatribes got me a warning.

You're acting real adult, dbag.

I forgot, on your wife's teacher salary you lie to cry about, you probably can't afford the 45 cents

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acidic

I'll lower myself down to your level for just this one post. I can just about guarantee that I made more in just my hobby alone than you'll make in the next 2 years. I buy and sell houses as a hobby and made a PROFIT of $ 217k last year. This year is looking even better. I'm thinking of quitting my job in which I make only $ 184k. Real estate is pretty exciting.

Energy costs are relatively high in this area. I noticed that my power bill goes up a noticeable amount ($15-20 a month) when I find myself gaming alot. That is a big sum of money for some people. Therefor, it would prohibit them from running 2 rigs just to play in bed or whatnot. So yeah. Back to grown up things now. Maybe you should give it a go

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jbitzer

Yeah, lower yourself to my level, that's why your hatred filled diatribes got you warned right?

If you make so much, one would wonder why you make your wife work at all, let alone cry how underpaid she is. Forgive me for not believing you.

A 15$ a month charge is more palatable to some than upgrading multiple $300 components at a time.

I only make about 120k a year, but since running a full time server costs me $30 a year, I'd venture a guess I'm still ahead.

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acidic

What is this "warning" not that I really care. As I stated in the other thread, my wife works for the love of teaching. No one "makes" her and we certainly don't need the money. It is OK that you don't believe that I make that much. Plenty make way more than me. Just be glad you have a job.

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jbitzer

Then she and you shouldn't bitch about the pay. Problem with teachers: I don't do it for the money! Waah waah waah underpaid for 180 days work.

I assumed by your run and tattle 4 year old comments that someone had warned you about the prior personal attack thread that got closed. You know, the one you and your buddies all decided to make assumptions about my personal life and then attack that straw man?

Whatever though. I hope the real estate does work out for you, unlike a lot of people, I don't care about someone else's success. Not like it's taking anything from me. I'm content with my situation.

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LatiosXT

This is almost the same reason why anyone would want the streaming features on the PS3/PS4 to PSP/PS Vita. It's a nice novelty, but I'm not in a situation where I'm another room where my computer isn't and I want to play a game very often.

Although in the PS3, PS4, and WiiU's case (since it also has this technology), it does free up the TV.

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Brock Kane

I have my PC connected to my 55" Samsung HDTV via HDMI cable. Therefore, I can game in my den, and my wife can watch me gaming in the living room. So, why would I need to stream my games to another PC?

I'm just not getting this. Someone please explain.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Well,
Let me Explain
I invented this streaming craze to show you that you could have a state of the art graphics card upstairs on a quadcore churning out High Grade Graphics for any game and then simply compress the video and stream it to another computer (preferabbly a Tablet) to get High End Graphics at nominal framerates with minimal lag to play the best games with the best graphics in your back yard with a cheap tablet instead of investing in a very expensive tablet to get the same framerates but lower quality levels than the high end graphics card upstairs

I just liked the idea of controlling a vastly superior computer from a cheap tablet from.......just about anywhere

Bullwinkle J Moose

I'll Link you to my older posts if you like
Some here might doubt my wild claims

as usual

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jbitzer

It's so you can play games on a crappy computer that can't run the game itself from your more powerful PC. It's not to just stream the game video to a tv, it would be like if you wanted to game on a netbook, but the host computer is actually doing all the work.

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vrmlbasic

Why would I want to play a game on my netbook in my living room when I could just walk to my computer room and game there?

If this lets a player seamlessly transition between gaming devices so then gamers could be gaming on their PCs but then switch to a laptop so they can keep gaming while taking a dump, well, I guess I could see how that could appeal but that's too hardcore for me lol.

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jbitzer

I think it's more along these lines:
you might have a PC in your living room, but I don't wan tone becuse powerful components are noisy as hell. I hate how loud my old PS3and 360 fans were.

You can get a passively cooled little NUC or somethign and through streaming, have it play AAA games the specs wouldn't support.

This basically removes the barriers that some hardware config compromises make for the average HTPC.

Also, older hardware can be thrown on a different TV to go play in another room if someone else is hogging the TV.

It's a useful feature, it just didn't work so great when I first tried it.

Also saves you upgrading multiple machines.

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unreal-4-life

I have been Steam OS from the beginning and In-home stream almost every day. All I can say is if you got 2 "Desktops" that are High End you better be using this your missing out.

#1)For streaming every one should give it a try

#2)Computer geeks try this. Hard wirer the network and you will double the eye candy effect with your bests video cards. Trust me its awesome.(not for laptops IMO)

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D00dlavy

Steam is amazing. Simply amazing.

...Death to Origin.

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jgottberg

Which again begs the question, why does anyone need a steambox?

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psycoking

Not sure I understand you? Pertaining to the article, a steambox would serve as the low powered streaming client connected to your TV. Hence why you might need or want one, especially if you don't have a spare pc or laptop lying around.

That seems obvious though, so I'm wondering if you're trying to make a comment about streaming games across a local network in general?

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LatiosXT

If you don't have a computer to hook up to a TV, then what's the appeal of a Steam Machine over say... a laptop? If I'm going to drop a few hundred dollars, a laptop to me sounds like it could go a longer way than a Steam Machine.

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psycoking

It depends on what you want and what you're really looking for.

Steam Machines geared toward streaming games rather than playing then natively are going to come around the sub $500 range (probably cheaper - imagine NUC style Steam Machines). Sure, you can get yourself a cheap laptop at that range that you can also use as a makeshift Steam Machine hooked up to your TV, but then you're stuck with a cheap laptop.

If what you really want is a laptop, then a cheap sub $500 laptop will probably not satisfy you. Your better off spending more for a better laptop, which, yes, you can then use as a Steam Machine and save yourself some cash by not buying a dedicated device.

But if you just want a cheap way to stream PC games to your living room, do you really want to get a laptop for that? Are you ever going to use it as a laptop? Or just keep it hooked up to the TV all the time? In which case, wouldn't you be better served by getting a small set top box with a pre-installed 10 foot interface?

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LatiosXT

The problem that I find is... I'm going to spend something like $400-$500 on a dedicated streaming box that can play some lower end games.

$400-$500 to spend on my TV entertainment center can go towards the PS4 or XB1, which has streaming capabilities in it (assuming you have a compatible device) and works better as a dedicating gaming machine, relatively speaking. Or just get a PS3 or 360 and enjoy the massive library it has.

If I were to spend it on a computer, I'd have a cheaper, portable device that I can use to do other things than stream games from another rig to my TV. And yes, I do find cheaper laptops actually useful. I have a $400 Atom-based convertible that I get a fair amount of use out of, because lugging around my 17" gaming laptop is not always viable or desired. I could still get a $400-$500 i3 laptop at a fire sale from Best Buy if I wanted some more horsepower.

Honestly, the only thing that would be lacking is the 802.11ac adapter, it doesn't take much processing power to handle streamed content (I mean, if a PS Vita, which is a lot worse in computational power than a PC can do it, then a lower end laptop can do it)

As much as this is a PC enthusiast website, yes, I still find console gaming a very viable solution to fulfill my gaming needs. And as a gamer, I think it's stupid to completely shove off platforms because one of them is somehow superior to another.

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psycoking

Sure there are other options at that price point. And I'm not ruling out consoles as viable gaming devices either. I'm just saying that there are indeed reasons why a person would want a Steam Machine. Maybe not everyone, but they are products that would attract some people.

In your case, a laptop or a console would obviously serve you better. In my case, I've been hooking my PC up to the TV for about a decade now (I started out with an old fat CRT using an S-Video cable), and don't want to go without. This was a lot easier to do when I had my PC and TV in the same room, but now that I have my own place, with my TV in the living room instead of the bedroom, some problems are starting to crop up.

Right now, because my monitor died, my big, powerful rig is hooked up to the TV. I'm typing this on a spare laptop I got for $260 for the purposes of playing around with linux. It's a piece of crap, and not really suitable as a primary PC. It does the job when I need to type something out, but I need more than this.

I want to bring my PC back to my desk, but I still want a PC connected to my TV in the living room. For cost and aesthetics reasons, I'm looking at Steam Machines to see if they could provide a solution.

In all honesty, I'd rather have a 2nd full power machine. But if the price is right, and streaming works out well, I might invest in a cheap Steam Machine instead. I gave out a $500 price point to compare cost against consoles, but I think we will see some ultra cheap NUC style Steam Machines intended only for streaming, maybe in the $200-$300 range. Possibly cheaper, depending on the processor requirements for streaming (think celeron or possibly atom based Steam Machines).

I don't know how Steam Machines will do in the market. My guess is that the cheaper streaming based ones will find an audience for those that want a cheap way to play PC games in their living room, but don't want to move their PC.

On the high-end, I think only those Steam Machines that dual boot Windows or Steam Machine style boxes that only run Windows will do well. No one is going to want to spend money on powerful hardware only to stream their games, which means Windows is going to be necessary at the high-end until more AAA games see native Steam OS releases.

Either way, at least Valve has gotten the ball rolling on mini gaming rigs meant for the living room.

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acidic

my thoughts exactly. I like choices but see absolutely no reason for steam boxes.

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AFDozerman

What are the minimum specs on the computer being streamed to? I'm about to build an AM1 based HTPC.

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themohawkadmin

I can stream to my Atom Z3740D, 2gb ram tablet @ 60fps over Dual-band Wireless N perfectly. So I'm guessing most anything Core 2 or newer can handle it just fine.

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Sean D Knight

Unfortunately no minimum specs were provided for the secondary unit. 

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jbitzer

Well, I might have to try this again. When it first got released I noticed decent framerates on Bioshock Infinite, but playing it gave me a headache for some reason. The nearest I can equate it to is like looking at those 3d illusion pictures too long. The other games didn't stream so well, so I can't verify if it's just bioshock or the stream.

Guess it's time to try again.

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vrmlbasic

I'm not sure why I should want to do this.

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Innomasta

Please elaborate

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vrmlbasic

My gaming PC is attached to a much higher res monitor than any of my laptops sport. I don't really see why I'd want to stream games to a laptop when it'll be an inferior experience to just walking to my desktop and playing them there.

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acidic

haven't tried it in months. long before they enabled hardware encode/decode. only used it for ac4 black flags and it wasn't bad but wasn't great

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Innomasta

Been streaming since the beta, and I love it. It's pretty much my only motivation to buy an AC router.