Tears of Joy: Crysis 2 to Receive Pre-Release PC Demo After All

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burntham77

This is only fair, considering the original game was built for PCs first and foremost. Pinch it and curl it, consoles.

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Deanjo

I stopped downloading demos when they started involving a gigabyte download for 10 minutes of game play.

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Mighty BOB!

This is good.  One of the reasons I got the first Crysis was because I played the demo first.

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Avery

Crysis Wars is still the best multiplayer FPS experience. It really does take a while to be skillful at and master.

It is totally more responsive that other FPS I've played imo.

Here's hoping that Crysis 2 brings the mod abilities and options one would expect a couple of years on to multiplayer.

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Ghok

I was looking for something to test my system out, but I'm not a multiplayer person. I might still give it a whirl, nice to see a win for pc gamers.

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whathuhitwasntme

uhm crysis was the game to play long before call of duty was the game to play!

 

 

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Emgtek

Yessssss

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OliverSudden

Oh goody.  Another rail shooter vying to be the next Call of Duty franchise.  I'd gladly wait forever to play Crysis 2.

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Pablo-man

Neither Call of Duty or Crysis is rail shooter. Kinda the opposite, to be honest.

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OliverSudden

Hey, look at that!  Honesty is my thing too.  So let's be honest.

You're not saying Call of Duty is a sandbox game...like Far Cry was...are you?  Because, that was my point.

Look at the transition of the Crytek franchise:  Far Cry was very sandboxy, which made it fun.  Shoot or stealth: you make your own plan of attack from any direction.  The early levels of Crysis, released many years later, were like that too.  But at a certain point in that game, somewhere after the halfway mark, someone drained all the sand out of the box and replaced it with rails.  Yes, I'm aware that Far Cry and Crysis are different series but they do have a common pedigree.

As for Call of Duty, well, I hardly need to defend my accusations.  That franchise has ALWAYS been a rail shooter, from back when it was about WWII.  No sand to be seen anywhere.  No sand.  No box.  Rails.

But don't fret guy, rail shooters are very very popular.  Black Ops broke sales records (set by the previous CoD rail shooter) and I'm quite certain the next game to break the new sales record will be...a Derek Smart game.  Just kidding.  It may or may not be Call of Duty but I'd be willing to bet my WASD keys that it'll be a rail shooter.  I mean, of course.

Tell you what, if Crysis 2 turns out to be a genuine sandbox shooter (i.e. where you can approach enemy positions from any direction you like, including from above, and that you can choose to follow the main storyline at the pace that YOU set...or not at all) then I'll gladly purchase it.  I'll even come back here and say that I was wrong.  Fair is fair.  But since we're being honest, I don't think I'll have to.

No, give me Stalker, the Elder Scrolls, and the new Fallouts...games that construct a big giant world and plop me in the middle of it with sparse supplies, and give me the freedom to do whatever I like...and I'm happy.

As for you rail passengers, well, be sure to give your ticket to the conductor when he comes around.

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Pablo-man

I would never call CoD a sandbox shooter. Neither is really a rail shooter, but really that's just arguing semantics. But it will be quite a while before a large number of sandbox shooters are available because series like CoD don't require much innovation and sell insanely well. 

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OliverSudden

Semantics.  Yeah, that word get misused these days about as much as irony.  Semantics refers to the minor wording differences to say essentially the same thing; basically...a problem of understanding that comes down to word selection.

Rail shooters, to me, are guided arcade games.  They look phenomenal but the player has limited control over tactics, limited inventory management, limited health management, and exploration is largely restricted.  Also, the main storyline of a rail shooter is the only way to progress in the game.  There are no "side quests" to speak of in a rail shooter.

That's not to say rail shooters are inherently bad.  In fact, I recently played Metro 2033, which is a big time rail shooter, so much so that half the time, the game was quite literally on rails.  The game takes place in a subway and they'd place you on a handcar trolly kind of thing, where you'd shoot at surrounding monsters/enemies.  Honestly, it was more fun than I expected.  But overall I prefer not to be limited to such an extent.

The differences between a rail shooter and a sandbox game, I submit, are not merely semantics.

So I'm curious.  What's your definition of a rail shooter?  What do you understand such a game to be like?

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hammer6556

actually a game like Dead Space Extraction is a rail shooter, COD is a standard fps.  but i guess thats just semantics, or maybe its not.  see im into honestly as well, and i await your last word of unquestionable rightness.

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OliverSudden

Cool then.  Describe the gameplay differences between Dead Space Extraction and CoD: BlackOps.

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OliverSudden

52 hours of crickets later...point made.