intel http://www.maximumpc.com/taxonomy/term/163/ en Newegg Daily Deals: EVGA Superclocked GeForce GTX 760, AMD FX-8350 Black Edition, and More! http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_evga_superclocked_geforce_gtx_760_amd_fx-8350_black_edition_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/evga_sc_760.jpg" alt="EVGA Superclocked GeForce GTX 760" title="EVGA Superclocked GeForce GTX 760" width="300" height="183" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>Summer might be winding down, but that doesn't mean it's game over for gamers. The past few months has seen some big titles get released, and the fun will continue through the back-to-school shopping season and beyond, starting with the impending release of Grand Theft Auto V for PC. Are you prepared to play everything that's coming out? If not, check out today's top deal for an <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130932&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-GPU-N82E16814130932-_-0801&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">EVGA Superclocked GeForce GTX 760 Graphics Card</a> for <strong>$230</strong> with free shipping (normally $240; additional $10 mail-in-rebate). This card is factor overclocked from stock to 1072MHz (core) an 1137MHz (boost). It also features 2GB of GDDR5 memory on a 256-bit bus running at 6,008MHz (effective). EVGA's custom ACX cooler keeps the card nice and cool, allowing for 15 percent lower GPU temps, 7 percent lower mosfet temps, and 15 percent lower memory temps.</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113284&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819113284-_-0801&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">AMD FX-8350 Black Edition Vishera 8-Core 4.0GHz (4.2GHz Turbo) Socket AM3+ 125W Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$180</strong> with free shipping (normally $190 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCGW22</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824009513&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-DISPLAY-N82E16824009513-_-0801&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Acer S241HLbmid Black 24-inch 5ms HDMI Widescreen LED Backlight LCD Monitor</a> for <strong>$130</strong> with free shipping (normally $140 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCGW24</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820167192&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-SSD-N82E16820167192-_-0801&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel 730 Series 2.5-inch 480GB SATA 6Gb/s MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)</a> for <strong>$380</strong> with free shipping </p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233246&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-RAM-N82E16820233246-_-0801&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory</a> for <strong>$158</strong> with free shipping (normally $175 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCGW28</strong>])</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_evga_superclocked_geforce_gtx_760_amd_fx-8350_black_edition_and_more#comments Acer amd Daily Deals daily deals evga intel Newegg Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:26:07 +0000 The Maximum PC Staff 28276 at http://www.maximumpc.com Column: More Moore's Law Anxiety http://www.maximumpc.com/column_more_moores_law_2014 <!--paging_filter--><h3>Is Moore's Law over?</h3> <p>Will the hand-wringing over <a title="moore's law" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore's_law" target="_blank">Moore's Law</a> never stop? Intel's announcement that its next-generation 14nm process will be delayed a couple months triggered yet another round of fretting over the fate of this widely misunderstood "law".</p> <p>Much of the panic is because Intel's "tick-tock" strategy has indeed operated like clockwork, chiming a smaller geometry every two years. Slippage is common at other companies, but not at Intel. So when the world's largest semiconductor vendor stops the clock for a few months, hearts begin palpitating.</p> <p><img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/00/Transistor_Count_and_Moore%27s_Law_-_2011.svg/800px-Transistor_Count_and_Moore%27s_Law_-_2011.svg.png" alt="moore's law" title="moore's law" width="620" height="557" /></p> <p>Especially when Intel admits that disappointing yields prompted the delay. The factory's initial 14nm wafers have more defects than expected, ruining too much of each batch. If a certain percentage aren't usable, Intel can't earn the profits needed to pay for the factory.</p> <p>But worry not—Moore's Law isn't dead yet. First, remember that it's merely an observation, not a scientific principle. In 1965, Gordon Moore observed that affordable integrated circuits were growing about twice as dense every 12 months. In 1975, slower progress persuaded him to lengthen the period to 24 months. (The oft-quoted 18-month cycle was someone else's idea.) So the law isn't carved in stone, much less in silicon.</p> <p>Besides, the industry hasn't kept pace for years. The law predicts that an affordable chip in 2014 should integrate nearly 38 billion components. (Moore counted resistors and capacitors, not just transistors.) The densest microprocessors today have more than 5 billion transistors, and the densest memory chips have 4 billion transistors and about 8 billion total components. So the curve is definitely flattening, but it's still a long way from flat.</p> <p>Intel's three-month blip is a reminder that process technology is becoming fiendishly complex, even for the world's best engineers. If future delays stretch into a whole year, we'll know we have crossed the watershed.</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/column_more_moores_law_2014#comments column February issues 2014 intel Moore's Law semiconductors Fast Forward Columns Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:23:31 +0000 Tom Halfhill 27925 at http://www.maximumpc.com Newegg Daily Deals: PNY Optima 240GB SSD, Intel Core i5 4590, and More http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_pny_optima_240gb_ssd_intel_core_i5_4590_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/pny_optima_thumb.jpg" alt="PNY Optima" title="PNY Optima" width="300" height="269" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>We've seen some low priced SSDs ever since the cost of NAND flash memory chips took a nose dive, but today's top deal might just take the cake. It's for a <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820178720&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-SSD-N82E16820178720-_-0730&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">PNY Optima 2.5-inch 240GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive</a> for <strong>$85</strong> with free shipping (normally $110 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHA222</strong>]; additional $20 mail-in-rebate). If you've been holding off from swapping that aging HDD for a speedy SSD, this might be the deal you've been waiting for. It sports sequential read and write speeds of up of up 510MB/s and 320MB/s, respectively, along with up to 60,000 IOPS of 4k random read and 45,000 IOPS of 4k random write performance.</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147249&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-SSD-N82E16820147249-_-0730&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Samsung 840 EVO MZ-7TE500BW 2.5-inch TLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)</a> for <strong>$225</strong> with free shipping (normally $260 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHA23</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116991&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819116991-_-0730&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i5-4590 Haswell Quad-Core 3.3GHz LGA 1150 84W Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$190</strong> with free shipping (normally $200 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHA28</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136555&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-INT-HDD-N82E16822136555-_-0730&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Western Digital WD VelociRaptor 600GB 10000 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5-inch Internal Hard Drive</a> for <strong>$130</strong> with free shipping (normally $170 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHA236</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231628&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-RAM-N82E16820231628-_-0730&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">G.Skill Trident X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory</a> for <strong>$160</strong> with free shipping (normally $170 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHA36</strong>])</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_pny_optima_240gb_ssd_intel_core_i5_4590_and_more#comments Daily Deals daily deals g.skill intel Newegg pny samsung wd Western Digital Wed, 30 Jul 2014 16:56:17 +0000 The Maximum PC Staff 28266 at http://www.maximumpc.com Intel Lifts the Lid Off Upcoming Core i7 5960X Haswell-E Processor http://www.maximumpc.com/intel_lifts_lid_upcoming_core_i7_5960x_haswell-e_processor <!--paging_filter--><h3><img src="/files/u69/delidded_haswell-e.jpg" alt="Delidded Haswell-E" title="Delidded Haswell-E" width="228" height="128" style="float: right;" />Intel soldered the CPU die to the integrated heat spreader</h3> <p><strong>A picture making the rounds on the web shows what Intel's upcoming Core i7 5960X Haswell-E processor will look like</strong> if you have the nerve to pry off the integrated heat spreader (IHS). If you look close, you can see that beneath the adhesive layer that secures the IHS to the package is soldering from where Intel soldered the CPU die to the IHS with a strong epoxy. If you're an overclocker or otherwise concerned with temps, this a good sight to see.</p> <p>Soldering the CPU die to the IHS offers better heat conductivity than filling the gap with thermal interface material (TIM), the latter of which is the route Intel took with its Core i7 3770K, 4770K,a nd 4790K processors, according to the folks at <a href="http://www.ocdrift.com/intel-core-i7-5960x-de-lidded-haswell-e-uses-soldered-thermal-interface-material-tim/" target="_blank"><em>OCDrift.com</em></a>.</p> <p>While not game changing by any means, this is simply another reason to look forward to Haswell-E. Expected to launch this September, Haswell-E will coincide with Intel's X99 Express chipset and offer support DDR4 memory support.</p> <p>As for the stripped down Core i7 5960X on display, earlier rumors suggest it will rock 8 cores, 16 threads, a 3GHz to 3.3GHz (Turbo Boost) clockspeed, 20MB of L3 cache, and a 140W TDP.</p> <p><em>Follow Paul on <a href="https://plus.google.com/+PaulLilly?rel=author" target="_blank">Google+</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/paul_b_lilly" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/Paul.B.Lilly" target="_blank">Facebook</a></em></p> http://www.maximumpc.com/intel_lifts_lid_upcoming_core_i7_5960x_haswell-e_processor#comments Build a PC core i7 5960x cpu Hardware haswell-e intel overclocking processor News Tue, 29 Jul 2014 17:21:29 +0000 Paul Lilly 28259 at http://www.maximumpc.com Small PC Computing http://www.maximumpc.com/small_PCs_2014 <!--paging_filter--><h3>We tour the burgeoning world of wee PCs</h3> <p>In case you haven’t noticed, the PC is getting smaller. But it’s not getting smaller in the way the PC fatalists see it. If anything, enthusiast PCs have gotten larger. Witness Corsair’s 900D, Cooler Master’s Cosmos SE, and Digital Storm’s Aventum II.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/opener_13639_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/opener_13639_small.jpg" alt="Yes, the Haswell Nuc is actually this small." width="620" height="446" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Yes, the Haswell Nuc is actually this small.</strong></p> <p>The truth isn’t that the PC is getting smaller and thus going away; the truth is that for enthusiasts, there’s interest in gigantic PCs, small micro-towers, and now—Intel hopes—ultra-compact form factor (UCFF) PCs no larger than a book. All of which serve unique purposes, and thereby highlight the PCs unmatched versatility.</p> <p>UCFF PCs as a category aren’t new, of course. They’ve been around for years, but their performance has always been fairly underwhelming and they’ve always consisted of specialty hardware, to be embedded into an ATM or smart soda machine.</p> <p>But now that these compact computers are more capable than ever, readily available, and easily built, there’s no telling what new and interesting applications will spring forth. Is Intel actually onto something big with its new Next Unit of Computing (NUC) initiative?</p> <h3>Next Unit of What?</h3> <p><strong>Intel’s push to make the desktop smallera</strong></p> <p>Trying to figure out the actions of the world’s largest chip company can be confounding to consumers who don’t fully appreciate Intel’s size-13 footprint on the PC industry and its ability to single-handedly change the game.</p> <p>Sometimes when Intel sees a niche it thinks needs to be filled, it tries to jump start it from scratch. The company tried and failed, for example, with its Common Building Block program that was meant to create a DIY-laptop world with standardized power bricks, hard drives, optical drives, LCD panels, keyboards, and battery packs. While CBB never took off, many of the fruits of that effort are still with us.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/page3art_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/page3art_small.jpg" alt="Intel is even offering a limited-edition customized Dragon NUC. " width="620" height="454" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Intel is even offering a limited-edition customized Dragon NUC. </strong></p> <p>Now, Intel is attempting to both create and fill a niche again with its Next Unit of Computing, or NUC (rhymes with “luck”), a new ultra-compact form factor that the company hopes will push performance computing into unheard-of places.</p> <p>Unlike the CBB program, which was totally reliant on the participation of parts makers and laptop builders, NUCs are actually built and sold by Intel itself. In a nutshell, NUCs are simply 4x4-inch computers packing as much power as possible.</p> <p>From what we can tell, Intel’s actions aren’t intended to drive others out of the market. In fact, Intel seems to be trying to invite others into the NUC game. Thus far, Gigabyte has jumped in with its NUC-style Brix boxes that are proving to be fairly innovative. There are also other smaller and lesser-known brands and embedded-PC vendors in there, as well.</p> <p>Unlike Thin ITX, NUC-style boxes aren’t designed around industry-standard specs. The only things common between the NUC and Brix, for example, are the footprint, the power brick, and other mobile components they accomodate. You won’t, for example, be able to swap a motherboard from a Brix into a NUC because these PCs are generally customized to the chassis they’re in.</p> <h4>Challenges to NUC</h4> <p>One of the challenges NUC and its ilk share is the limited board space. At 4x4 inches, jamming in features has meant adding more layers to the motherboard. While typical ATX motherboards feature six- or even four-layer PCBs, NUCs’ are 10-layer. <br />Adding layers isn’t cheap, either. For example, in a 10-layer ATX motherboard—which you might see with a dual-proc board, where additional layers are needed to run all the traces of both processors—the PCB itself costs about $90.</p> <p>The path going forward for NUC isn’t to blow them up in size, either. Rather than making them, say, 5x5 inches or more in the future, Intel says it’s more interested in getting a 65-watt TDP processor to work reliably in a package of NUC’s current size. Of course, adding a hotter CPU means more cooling and a bigger and more power-hungry power brick, too.</p> <h4>NUC Sales</h4> <p>So, are NUC and NUC-style devices resonating with consumers? Intel didn’t give us exact sales figures, but it says it has seen healthy demand, with quarter-on-quarter growth from 30–50 percent. Interestingly, Intel says that even after it offered a lower-cost Celeron version using the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture, the demand has mostly been at the high end, with consumers actually preferring the initial Ivy Bridge Core i5 version.</p> <p>That’s another reason Intel thinks that NUCs aren’t actually hurting the desktop. In fact, Intel believes the demand for a lot of performance, albeit in a tiny package, will reinvigorate the desktop, as people seek to put a PC in places they never could before.</p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3>Intel NUC D54250WYK</h3> <p><strong>Haswell comes to the NUC</strong></p> <p>The original Intel NUC DC3217BY we saw in late 2012 was an odd duck. The case was maroon and black, and while it showcased Intel’s newfangled Thunderbolt connectivity, there were no Ethernet, USB 3.0, or analog audio out.</p> <p>Intel cited limited board space as the reason for the port selection on that model (to be fair, Intel did offer a dual-HDMI version with gigabit Ethernet and a single USB 3.0 port) and soldiered on despite the skepticism over the device. That’s good news because the latest NUC leaves few questions unanswered.</p> <p>The newest Haswell NUC D54250WYK shares the same footprint as the original NUC but sits about an eighth of an inch shorter. Rather than the Core i3-3217U in the original NUC, the top-end Haswell NUC features a 1.3GHz Core i5-4250U that will Turbo Boost up to 2.6GHz. There’s no lack of ports on this unit, either. The Haswell NUC includes a Mini Display Port, Mini HDMI, gigabit Ethernet, four USB 3.0 ports, analog audio out, and an infrared port.</p> <p>The newest Haswell NUC D54250WYK shares the same footprint as the original NUC but sits about an eighth of an inch shorter. Rather than the Core i3-3217U in the original NUC, the top-end Haswell NUC features a 1.3GHz Core i5-4250U that will Turbo Boost up to 2.6GHz. There’s no lack of ports on this unit, either. The Haswell NUC includes a Mini Display Port, Mini HDMI, gigabit Ethernet, four USB 3.0 ports, analog audio out, and an infrared port.</p> <p>Internally, there’s a pair of DDR3 SO-DIMM slots and stacked Mini PCIe slots that let you install an mSATA drive and wireless card. The original NUC had overheating issues that caused some of the mSATA drives to error out. Intel has apparently addressed this by tweaking the fan and adding a thermal pad that rests on the mSATA drive. The shell in all NUCs is prewired for Wi-FI. The motherboard in this NUC also features a SATA 6Gb/s port and a port for SATA power, too. Intel apparently plans to use the same board in a future NUC that will be tall enough to support cheaper and far larger notebook hard drives. The motherboard itself is an Intel design and features a beautiful UEFI as well as the QS87 chipset.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/untitled-13221_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/untitled-13221_small.jpg" alt="After a puzzling first effort, Intel offers nearly all you could ask for in its NUC follow-up." width="620" height="522" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>After a puzzling first effort, Intel offers nearly all you could ask for in its NUC follow-up.</strong></p> <p>Performance isn’t a primary driver of people who run these mini PCs, but we decided to see how this Haswell NUC stacked up against the original NUC. That unit features a 1.8 Core i3-3217U CPU on the Ivy Bridge microarchitecture. Both NUCs are dual-core Hyper-Threaded parts, so the only real performance difference is due to the Turbo Boost of the Haswell and the newer microarchitecture. As expected, the Core i5 gives the original Ivy Bridge a pasting in CPU-related tasks. In graphics, it’s closer between the HD4000 and HD5000, but the Haswell part generally is in front. Oddly, the Ivy Bridge NUC comes out on top in 3DMark Ice Storm, which tests basic graphics performance, but falls back in 3DMark Cloud Gate. Neither NUC is suited for serious gaming, but in the 10-year-old Counter Strike: Source graphics stress test, both gave acceptable frame rates at 1080p.</p> <div class="module orange-module article-module"> <div class="module orange-module article-module"><span class="module-name">SPECIFICATIONS/Benchmarks</span><br /> <div class="module-content"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="spec-table orange"> <table style="width: 620px; height: 265px;" border="0"> <thead> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><strong>Haswell NUC</strong></td> <td><strong>Ivy Bridge NUC</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Model</td> <td class="item-dark">D54250WYK</td> <td>DC3217IYE</td> </tr> <tr> <td>CPU</td> <td>1.3GHz Core i5-4250U</td> <td>1.3GHz Core i5-4250U<br /><strong>&nbsp;</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Graphics</td> <td class="item-dark">HD5000</td> <td>HD4000</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ports</td> <td>Mini HDMI 1.4a, DisplayPort 1.2, 4x USB 3.0, gigabit Ethernet, analog audio out, IrDA, Kensington lock port</td> <td>2x HDMI 1.4A, 3x USB 2.0, gigabit Ethernet, Kensington lock port</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Stitch.EFx (sec)</td> <td><strong>1,747</strong></td> <td>2,453<strong><br /></strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>ProShow Producer (sec)</td> <td><strong>2,567</strong></td> <td>3,729</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3DMark Cloud Gate</td> <td><strong>3,958</strong></td> <td>3,409</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3DMark Ice Storm</td> <td>32,157</td> <td><strong>35,969</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Counter Strike Source (fps)</td> <td><strong>63.23</strong></td> <td>52.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Google Octane 2.0</td> <td><strong>17,832</strong></td> <td>10,643</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption Idle (watts)</td> <td><strong>5</strong></td> <td>8</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption Idle (watts)</td> <td><strong>24</strong></td> <td>35</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption YouTube 1080p (watts)</td> <td>19</td> <td><strong>14.5</strong></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><em>Best scores are bolded. <br /></em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p>We measured power consumption of both NUCs using the same power load and the same power brick (both were outfitted with similar parts, too). On idle, the Haswell unit drank about 5 watts versus the 8 watts of the Ivy Bridge unit. We also tried a worst-case scenario with Prime95 and Furmark running simultaneously. The Haswell used 24 watts to the Ivy Bridge’s 35W. While watching a 1080p video on YouTube, the Ivy Bridge unit used but 14.5 watts, interestingly, while the Haswell NUC used 19 watts.</p> <p>The Haswell NUC is likely the fastest NUC available today, as no one has figured out how to shoehorn a quad-core into the unit. But it’s not cheap. We found the unit on the street for about $375. Before you balk, remember that you’re getting a kit that includes the CPU and PSU. Yes, you can get a cheaper system by going larger—but if you want small and fast, this is the best yet.</p> <p><strong>Intel NUC D54250WYK</strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <div class="module-content" style="margin-top: -20px;"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="verdict"><img src="/sites/maximumpc.com/themes/maximumpc/i/mxpc_8.jpg" alt="score:8" title="score:8" width="210" height="80" /></div> </div> </div> <p><strong>$375, <a href="http://www.intel.com/ " target="_blank">www.intel.com</a></strong></p> <h3>Gigabyte Brix Projector GB-BXPi3-4010</h3> <p>Intel’s goal with the NUC initiative was to create a new category of computing. What that category would be or how it would be used, the company didn’t really know when it started.</p> <p>While Gigabyte has several NUC-style clones, dubbed the “Brix” line, the one that really captured our interest is the Brix Projector. Yup, a UCFF PC with a DLP pico projector and 1.5-watt speaker integrated into it. The projector isn’t super bright, but it outputs a decent 75 ANSI-rated lumens. That means you won’t be using it outdoors in the daylight or in a very bright room, but it’s far better than the first 15-lumen pico projectors of yesteryear. It offers enough light that Gigabyte rates the device as being capable of projecting on a screen up to 85 inches. Resolution is also average at 864x480, or WVGA res, but that’s pretty standard for most pico projectors that are still actually “pico.” We’ll also note that lower resolutions are actually quite passable for media projection. Gigabyte even had the foresight to integrate a standard tripod mount into the base of the PC, too.</p> <p>Inside the Brix Projector you’ll find a pair of DDR3 SO-DIMM slots, and the same stacked layout to take mSATA and Wi-Fi cards as in Intel NUCs. External ports are also generous, with four USB 3.0, gigabit Ethernet, a Mini DisplayPort 1.2, full-size HDMI 1.4a, an analog jack that pulls double duty as optical SPDIF output, and a Mini HDMI-in port should you want to use the unit as a projector from another device.</p> <div class="module orange-module article-module"> <div class="module orange-module article-module"><span class="module-name">SPECIFICATIONS/Benchmarks</span><br /> <div class="module-content"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="spec-table orange"> <table style="width: 620px; height: 265px;" border="0"> <thead> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><strong>Brix Projector</strong></td> <td><strong>Ivy Bridge NUC</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Model</td> <td class="item-dark">GB-BXPi3-4010</td> <td>DC3217IYE</td> </tr> <tr> <td>CPU</td> <td>1.7GHz Core i3-4010U</td> <td>1.8 Core i3-3217U<br /><strong>&nbsp;</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Graphics</td> <td class="item-dark">HD4400</td> <td>HD4400</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ports</td> <td>HDMI 1.4a, Mini HDMI in, Mini DisplayPort 1.2, gigabit Ethernet, 4x USB 3.0, analog audio, S/PDIF</td> <td>2x HDMI 1.4A, 3x USB 2.0, gigabit Ethernet, Kensington lock port</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Stitch.EFx (sec)</td> <td><strong>2,441</strong></td> <td>2,453</td> </tr> <tr> <td>ProShow Producer (sec)</td> <td><strong>3,564</strong></td> <td>3,729</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3DMark Cloud Gate</td> <td><strong>3,667</strong></td> <td>3,409</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3DMark Ice Storm</td> <td>26,475</td> <td><strong>35,969</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Counter Strike Source (fps)</td> <td><strong>53.29</strong></td> <td>52.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Google Octane 2.0</td> <td><strong>11,624</strong></td> <td>10,643</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption Idle (watts)</td> <td><strong>7.5</strong></td> <td>8</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption Idle (watts)</td> <td><strong>24</strong></td> <td>35</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption YouTube 1080p (watts)</td> <td>19</td> <td><strong>14.5</strong></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><em>Best scores are bolded. <br /></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/untitled-13223_small_1.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/untitled-13223_small_0.jpg" alt="Yup. There’s indeed a projector integrated into this PC that’s no bigger than a Wendy’s Baconator." width="620" height="502" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Yup. There’s indeed a projector integrated into this PC that’s no bigger than a Wendy’s Baconator.</strong></p> <p>The CPU in the model we reviewed is a Haswell 1.7GHz Core i3-4010U with HD4400 graphics. Again, extreme performance isn’t a key metric for people looking at this class of device, but we were still interested to see how it does against the Ivy Bridge Intel NUC DC3217IYE. Remember, both the Intel Ivy Bridge NUC and the Brix have Turbo Boost disabled at the factory. Despite the Ivy Bridge NUC having a 100MHz advantage, the Brix Projector was slightly faster in some tests. In other tests, though, both were dead even. Clearly, if you really need the performance in a UCFF, pony up for a Core i5 part.</p> <p>In general, power consumption on idle was slightly higher (using an external monitor) with the IB NUC; under our CPU- and GPU-heavy loads and simply playing a 1080p YouTube video, the Brix was on par with the Haswell Intel NUC. As with that PC, the Brix Projector consumed more power than the older Ivy Bridge NUC playing the 1080p video.</p> <p>Using the Brix Projector is a hoot. The graphics signal, you should know, is passed internally, so there’s no hooptie external pass-through cable. You can actually run both the projector and an external monitor simultaneously.</p> <p>Overall, it’s a slick little unit. The question is, what would a normal person need it for? The answer is, most of us wouldn’t need it. But don’t take that to be a negative. There are certainly specialized applications for it, such as media installations, commercial applications, or even an ad-hoc mini-theater setup for the kids. Again, it’s not everybody’s cup of tea, but the fact that you can get a “real” computer with a 75-lumen projector is pretty mind-boggling.</p> <p><strong>Gigabyte Brix Projector</strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <div class="module-content" style="margin-top: -20px;"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="verdict"><img src="/sites/maximumpc.com/themes/maximumpc/i/mxpc_7.jpg" alt="score:7" title="score:7" width="210" height="80" /></div> </div> </div> <p><strong>$600, <a href="http://www.gigabyte.us/ " target="_blank">www.gigabyte.us</a></strong></p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3>Gigabyte Brix Pro</h3> <p><strong>Faster than a tower. Really</strong></p> <p>In the land of ARM and off-brand x86 parts, the dual-core Core i3 is king. After all, when we talk about the “high-performance” needs of UCFF users, the performance of a Haswell-based CPU or even an Ivy Bridge part is like going back in time and landing a P-51 Mustang next to the Wright brothers after they just touched down at Kitty Hawk.</p> <p>Following that same analogy, you can think of Gigabyte’s blisteringly fast Brix Pro as an X-Wing fighter making a fly-by, wagging its wings, and then flipping the bird before making the jump to light speed. We’re not kidding, either. The Brix Pro is simply the fastest NUC-style UCFF we’ve ever tested. We actually watched it outpace our full-tower, six-core 3.2 Core i7-3630K that’s clocked full-time at 3.9GHz.</p> <p>The secret is Gigabyte’s ability to magically integrate a full-on Core i7-4770R in the Brix Pro. The Core i7-4770R “Crystalwell” is no mere Haswell part. Its main claim to fame is 128MB of super-fast embedded DRAM on the CPU package that acts as gigantic L4 cache (a Core i7-4770K’s L3 cache is 8MB). This cache greatly increases bandwidth for graphics operations and puts it on par with GeForce GT 650M discrete graphics. Since it acts as L4 cache, it can also greatly aid some application workloads, too. And no you can’t buy it, it’s only available soldered to motherboards. Oh, and it’s a full-on desktop-class quad-core Hyper-Threaded i7 chip that’ll hit 3.9GHz on Turbo.</p> <div class="module orange-module article-module"> <div class="module orange-module article-module"><span class="module-name">SPECIFICATIONS/Benchmarks</span><br /> <div class="module-content"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="spec-table orange"> <table style="width: 620px; height: 265px;" border="0"> <thead> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><strong>Brix Pro</strong></td> <td><strong>Ivy Bridge NUC</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Model</td> <td class="item-dark">GB-BXi7-4770R</td> <td>DC3217IYE</td> </tr> <tr> <td>CPU</td> <td>Core 3.2Ghz i7-4770R</td> <td>1.8 Core i3-3217U<br /><strong>&nbsp;</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Graphics</td> <td class="item-dark">Iris Pro 5200</td> <td>HD4000</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Ports</td> <td>HDMI 1.4a, DisplayPort 1.2, 4x USB 3.0, gigabit Ethernet, Kensington lock port</td> <td>2x HDMI 1.4a, 3x USB 2.0, gigabit Ethernet, Kensington lock port</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Stitch.EFx (sec)</td> <td>867</td> <td>2,453<strong><br /></strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>ProShow Producer (sec)</td> <td><strong>1,410</strong></td> <td>3,729</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3DMark Cloud Gate</td> <td><strong>10,406</strong></td> <td>3,409</td> </tr> <tr> <td>3DMark Ice Storm</td> <td><strong>68,195</strong></td> <td>35,969</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Counter Strike Source (fps)</td> <td><strong>149.43</strong></td> <td>52.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Google Octane 2.0</td> <td><strong>26,893</strong></td> <td>10,643</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption Idle (watts)</td> <td>8</td> <td>8</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption Idle (watts)</td> <td>87</td> <td><strong>35<br /></strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>Power Consumption YouTube 1080p (watts)</td> <td>20</td> <td><strong>14.5</strong></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><em>Best scores are bolded. <br /></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/untitled-13228_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/untitled-13228_small.jpg" alt="The Brix Pro packs in more performance per cubic inch than any system we’ve ever tested." width="620" height="481" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>The Brix Pro packs in more performance per cubic inch than any system we’ve ever tested.</strong></p> <p>Physically, the Pro is about 2.5 inches tall, making it about half an inch taller than the Intel Haswell NUC on page 51. That height, though, gives the Brix Pro the capability to mount a 9.5mm 2.5-inch notebook drive. The motherboard still has an mSATA slot, so you can run an SSD as well as one of the upcoming 2TB 9.5mm hard drives.</p> <p>Like other NUC-style machines, besides the mSATA slot, you’ll also find a mini PCIe slot that Gigabyte has already populated with an 802.11ac as well as two SO-DIMM slots. There’s a single integrated power and SATA connector for the 2.5-inch drive, as well.</p> <p>On the performance tip, as we said, the Brix Pro smokes all other NUCs. That’s not a surprise, as it’s a quad-core part going up against dual-core parts. And we don’t mean a wisp of smoke—it’s a full four-alarm smoke-out with the Brix Pro offering 200 percent performance increases over the Ivy Bridge NUC and from 82–163 percent increases over the Haswell NUC. This desktop Haswell-R part is so fast, it slightly outpaced our desktop zero-point system in ProShow Producer 5 and was slower by just 4 percent in Stitch.Efx 2.0 runs. Yes. Faster than a six-core overclocked machine that’s 30 times bigger. Granted, the tower will eat it in multithreaded tasks and gaming, but the fact that a machine smaller than a retail CPU box can be faster than a mid-tower machine is incredible.</p> <p>There’s a cost, though. When you’re hammering it with a heavy workload, it gets a little whiny. It’s not horrible, but you will hear the fan under very heavy loads. It also drinks more. The CPU has a TDP rating of 65 watts and under extreme CPU and GPU loads, we saw at-the-wall power usage hit near 90 watts. Most of the time though, power consumption is quite reasonable. The last issue is cost. This bare-bones kit will set you back $650. Much of that is the CPU ($400), but either way, we know there’s a price for miniaturization. At least with the Brix Pro, you’re getting a hell of a lot of performance.</p> <p><strong>Gigabyte GB-BXi7-4770R</strong></p> <p><strong><br /></strong></p> <div class="module-content" style="margin-top: -20px;"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="verdict"><img src="/sites/maximumpc.com/themes/maximumpc/i/mxpc_9ka.jpg" alt="score:9ka" title="score:9ka" width="210" height="80" /></div> </div> </div> <p><strong>$650, <a href="http://www.gigabyte.us/ " target="_blank">www.gigabyte.us</a></strong></p> <h3>DIY NUC</h3> <p><strong>You can roll your own NUC—but should you?</strong></p> <p>To a DIYer, “building” a NUC is a bit of an insult. You basically buy a NUC or Brix, slot in two SO-DIMMs, a Wi-Fi card, an mSATA drive, and install the OS. If you posted such a “build” on YouTube, the hazelnut gallery would come out of the woodwork to rip you a new one in the comment section.</p> <p>All is not lost, however, for true wrenchers who want to actually build a UCFF PC from scratch, so-called kits be damned. We just wonder whether it makes much sense, because at this point there are a lot of barriers to entry to building your own.</p> <p>The first issue is getting a chassis. Intel has told us it really sees these devices as being purely custom computing options with the base NUC and NUC-style machines. While Mini-ITX and Thin ITX (more on that on page 56) feature standard I/O shields like their bigger siblings, ATX and microATX, NUC doesn’t have any standardized cutout for system I/O. That means any chassis would have to be built to take one of the multiple NUC motherboard port arrangements currently available. So don’t just buy a NUC motherboard and a NUC chassis without making sure they match. Most vendors will specify which NUC motherboard the chassis will fit.</p> <p>To experience what it would be like to build our own NUC, we ran with a Silverstone PT14 chassis. This aluminum chassis comes with an I/O shield for either the dual-HDMI-port Ivy Bridge boards or the Thunderbolt version. Our PT14 is the dual-HDMI version.</p> <div class="module orange-module article-module"> <div class="module orange-module article-module"><span class="module-name">DIY NUC-style</span><br /> <div class="module-content"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="spec-table orange"> <table style="width: 620px; height: 265px;" border="0"> <thead> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Silverstone Petit PT14 chassis</td> <td class="item-dark">$40</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Intel D33217GKE mobo/CPU</td> <td>$310</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">19V power brick</td> <td class="item-dark">$16</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Wi-Fi antennas</td> <td>$10</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Windows 8 OEM OS</td> <td>$99</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Adata 8GB DDR3/1333 RAM</td> <td>$65</td> </tr> <tr> <td>120GB Crucial mSATA drive</td> <td>$108</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi card</td> <td>$34</td> </tr> <tr> <td><strong>Total</strong></td> <td>$682</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p>The next issue is securing the NUC motherboard. Intel isn’t fully committed to supporting a DIY ecosystem, so rather than selling individual boards, it’s selling 10-packs of motherboards intended for system builders or integrators. In a bit of a wink, wink, nod, nod, though, some of the bulk packs of motherboards are broken up and sold to end users. This, of course, raises questions about warranty support, but according to LogicSupply.com (a popular vendor of embedded systems that seems to stock most of the esoteric NUC parts), the warranty for the boards are covered directly by Intel even if purchased stand-alone, so it seems Intel will stand behind them.</p> <div class="module orange-module article-module"> <div class="module orange-module article-module"><span class="module-name">BARE-BONES INTEL NUC</span><br /> <div class="module-content"> <div class="module-text full"> <div class="spec-table orange"> <table style="width: 620px; height: 265px;" border="0"> <thead> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Intel DC3217IYE</td> <td class="item-dark">$255</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Windows 8 OEM OS</td> <td>$99</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="item">Adata 8GB DDR3/1333 RAM</td> <td class="item-dark">$65</td> </tr> <tr> <td>120GB Crucial mSATA drive</td> <td>$108</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi card</td> <td>$34</td> </tr> <tr> <td><strong>Total</strong></td> <td>$561</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p>The board we went with was an Intel DC33217GKE “Golden Lake” motherboard. It comes with an integrated heatsink and fan—which won’t work, as the PT14 chassis features an integrated heat pipe that connects directly to the chassis. Since the CPU is 17 watts, it’s possible to dissipate much of the heat through the chassis. Our Golden Lake motherboard came with a standard Intel cooler, which we unscrewed by first removing the two visible screws holding down the fan. We then removed the three fans holding down the heatsink and gently removed it from the board. The PT14 does have a single fan that’s set to exhaust air out the bottom of the chassis.</p> <p>From there it’s as simple as screwing the motherboard to the top of the chassis, populating the RAM, Wi-Fi card, and mSATA, installing the power button, and you’re done. All told, it took us about 15 minutes to roll our own NUC going at a leisurely pace so as not to forever lose the screws. We’ll note that the Wi-Fi antennas didn’t come with our 802.11ac card (they typically don’t) so you’ll have to secure a pair of rubber duckies with cables (just Bing “rubber wifi antenna and internal cable,” select Image, and search for the rubber duck antennas with internal cables. They’re typically under $10.)</p> <p>Before you’re done, though, you’ll also need to buy the 19-volt power brick. Intel actually sells them on its NUC parts page for $15, or they can be found at retailers for $16, typically.</p> <p>There, you’re done. You’ve just built your first Next Unit of Computing. It wasn’t difficult and it’s kind of fun. But does it make sense?</p> <p>No, not at all. Not once you run the numbers. The parts to build your own NUC from scratch cost about $682 (including $99 for the OS). If you had bought a NUC bare-bone system and added the same 802.11ac, mSATA, and RAM from the DIY package you would spend: $561. Ouch. And that’s without having to search through Uncle Jim’s used computer store for a pair of rubber duck Wi-Fi antennas and finding someone who actually sells NUC chassis. From a fiscal point of view, it makes no sense whatsoever. Even our standard edict that building your own box gives you control over the parts, fan placement, and appearance really doesn’t apply because, really, is there that much of a difference?</p> <p>Again, Intel says it’s not sure where it’s going with NUC as a DIY proposition and that’s apparent to us, because the real kick in the gut here is the motherboard. A NUC bare-bones kit with motherboard, power brick, chassis, and internal Wi-Fi antennas is $255 on the street. The best price we could find for the NUC motherboard alone was $310. Perhaps if Intel decides to make the price of the NUC boards more reasonable the DIY angle will make more sense, but today, it’s a waste of scratch no matter how you cut it.</p> <h3>Parts of a Whole</h3> <p><strong>The essential components of a DIY NUC</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="/files/u152332/part_shots-13234_small.jpg" alt="The Silverstone PT14 NUC chassis dissipates heat using a heat pipe with a fan blowing air out the bottom." width="620" height="413" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>The Silverstone PT14 NUC chassis dissipates heat using a heat pipe with a fan blowing air out the bottom.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/part_shots-13238_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/part_shots-13238_small.jpg" alt="This Intel D33217GKE NUC motherboard isn’t packaged for consumers, but you can still buy them with apparent warranty support from Intel." width="620" height="541" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>This Intel D33217GKE NUC motherboard isn’t packaged for consumers, but you can still buy them with apparent warranty support from Intel.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/part_shots-13236_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/part_shots-13236_small.jpg" alt="With NUC, you’ll want higher-clocked modules and a dual-channel config if you care at all about 3D performance." width="620" height="510" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>With NUC, you’ll want higher-clocked modules and a dual-channel config if you care at all about 3D performance.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><img src="/files/u152332/part_shots-13237_small.jpg" alt="Like most NUCs, our DIY takes an mSATA drive. Newer units, however, will take 2.5-inch drives at the cost of space." width="620" height="450" /></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Like most NUCs, our DIY takes an mSATA drive. Newer units, however, will take 2.5-inch drives at the cost of space.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><a class="thickbox" href="/files/u152332/part_shots-13232_small_0.jpg"><img src="/files/u152332/part_shots-13232_small.jpg" alt="The NUC and Brix units all share the same basic 65-watt power supply." width="620" height="725" /></a></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>The NUC and Brix units all share the same basic 65-watt power supply.<br /></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> http://www.maximumpc.com/small_PCs_2014#comments feature Gigabyte Brix Pro Gigabyte Brix Projector GB-BXPi3-4010 Hardware intel March issues 2014 nuc pc small pc Features Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:01:57 +0000 Gordon Mah Ung 28032 at http://www.maximumpc.com Newegg Daily Deals: Intel Core i5 4670K Haswell, AMD FX-4300 Vishera, and More! http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_intel_core_i5_4670k_haswell_amd_fx-4300_vishera_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/intel_core_i5_4670k.jpg" alt="Intel Core i5 4670K" title="Intel Core i5 4670K" width="300" height="262" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>We're approaching the home stretch of summer and nearing the beginning of the back-to-school shopping season. If one of your goals was to build a new PC this summer, it's time to get hopping! It starts with a solid foundation, and if you need ideas, check out today's top deal for an <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116899&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819116899-_-0728&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i5 4670K Haswell CPU</a> for <strong>$220</strong> with free shippiong (normally $235 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHE23</strong>]). This quad-core chip runs at 3.4GHz to 3.8GHz, has 6MB of L3 cache, and sports an unlocked multiplier.</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236497&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-INT-HDD-N82E16822236497-_-0728&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">WD Blue 750GB 5400 RPM 8MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 2.5-inch Internal Notebook Hard Drive</a> for <strong>$50</strong> with free shipping (normally $55 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHE27</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113287&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819113287-_-0728&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">AMD FX-4300 Vishera Quad-Core 3.8GHz (4.0GHz) Socket AM3+ 95W Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$100</strong> with free shipping (normally $110 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHE24</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145345&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-RAM-N82E16820145345-_-0728&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory</a> for <strong>$81</strong> with free shipping (normally $90 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHE32</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824014300&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-DISPLAY-N82E16824014300-_-0728&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">BenQ GW2750HM Glossy Black 27-inch 4ms (GTG) HDMI Widescreen LED Backlight LCD Monitor</a> for <strong>$180</strong> with free shipping (normally $200 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHE58</strong>])</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_intel_core_i5_4670k_haswell_amd_fx-4300_vishera_and_more#comments amd BenQ corsair Daily Deals daily deals intel Newegg wd Western Digital Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:31:37 +0000 The Maximum PC Staff 28255 at http://www.maximumpc.com Breaking Down Intel's Three Broadwell Processor Lines for Mobile http://www.maximumpc.com/breaking_down_intels_three_broadwell_processor_lines_mobile_2014 <!--paging_filter--><h3><img src="/files/u69/intel_sign_5.jpg" alt="Intel Sign" title="Intel Sign" width="228" height="171" style="float: right;" />Three families of 14nm Broadwell parts are headed for mobile devices</h3> <p>See that over there? <strong>It's Intel's 5th Generation Core processor family, otherwise known as Broadwell, coming around the bend</strong>. There will be will three different variants for mobile, including the Y Series, U Series, and H Series, all of which will be built on a 14nm manufacturing process. You can expect the parts to start appearing in the fourth quarter of 2014, but do you know the difference between each line?</p> <p>The folks at <em>Fudzilla</em> <a href="http://www.fudzilla.com/home/item/35355-5th-generation-broadwell-14nm-family-comes-in-three-lines" target="_blank">posted a nice piece</a> detailing the differences in the three different Broadwell lines for mobile. Based on that and other info around the web, initial Broadwell for mobile parts will consist of the Core M 5Y70, 5Y10, and 5Y10a, all of which are BGA parts. Both the Core M 5Y70 and 5Y70a are dual-core parts clocked at 800MHz to 2GHz with 4MB of L3 cache, integrated GPU clocked at 100MHz to 800MHz, and a 4.5W TDP, though the 5Y70 is configurable to also run at 4W. As for the 5Y70, it's a dual-core chip with Hyper-Threading support that runs at 1.1GHz to 2.6GHz with 4MB of L3 cache, 100MHz to 850MHz GPU, and 4.5W TDP.</p> <p>Next up is the U Series that will also come in BGA form and TDPs ranging from 15W to 28W -- not too shabby considering that they have integrated graphics as well. These will be dual-core parts designed for Ultrabooks and NUC configurations with support for up to 16GB of DDR3L-1600 memory or 8GB of LPDDR3-1600.</p> <p>Finally, the H Series will also ship in BGA form with a 47W TDP. These will be the chips that end up in high-end systems.</p> <p><em>Follow Paul on <a href="https://plus.google.com/+PaulLilly?rel=author" target="_blank">Google+</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/paul_b_lilly" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/Paul.B.Lilly" target="_blank">Facebook</a></em></p> http://www.maximumpc.com/breaking_down_intels_three_broadwell_processor_lines_mobile_2014#comments 14nm broadwell cpu Hardware intel mobile prcessor News Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:25:38 +0000 Paul Lilly 28252 at http://www.maximumpc.com Cheap Windows Laptops Will Give Chromebooks Competition in the Second Half of 2014 http://www.maximumpc.com/cheap_windows_laptops_will_give_chromebooks_competition_second_half_2014 <!--paging_filter--><h3><img src="/files/u69/acer_laptop.jpg" alt="Acer Laptop" title="Acer Laptop" width="228" height="180" style="float: right;" />Get ready for an influx of $199 to $249 Windows laptops</h3> <p>A big reason why Chromebooks are selling so well is because they offer up basic functionality at dirt cheap prices. However, what would happen if Windows laptops could easily be found at the same price points? It's a question that will get answered within the next few months. That's because <strong>Intel, Microsoft, and notebook makers are collaborating on entry-level laptops that will sell for $199 to $249</strong>.</p> <p>Citing sources within the upstream supply chain, <a href="http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20140723PD213.html" target="_blank"><em>Digitimes</em> says</a> that these cheap Windows laptops will enter the market in the second half of this year. These will probably range in size from 10.1 inches to 15.6 inches with non-touchscreen displays powered by Intel's Bay Trail-M platform. Braswell-based processors could also sneak in.</p> <p>There are some parameters that Intel and Microsoft are insisting upon, such as keeping the clamshell laptops less than 25mm. The entry-level laptops must also have battery lives of 5 hours or more, 1-4GB of DDR memory, and either a 500GB hard drive or 16-32GB SSD. And of course they'll run Windows 8.1.</p> <p><a href="https://plus.google.com/+PaulLilly?rel=author" target="_blank">Google+</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/paul_b_lilly" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/Paul.B.Lilly" target="_blank">Facebook</a></p> http://www.maximumpc.com/cheap_windows_laptops_will_give_chromebooks_competition_second_half_2014#comments chromebook Hardware intel laptop microsoft mobile notebook Windows News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:58:02 +0000 Paul Lilly 28231 at http://www.maximumpc.com Intel Launches Business Class Solid State Drive Pro 2500 Series http://www.maximumpc.com/intel_launches_business_class_solid_state_drive_pro_2500_series <!--paging_filter--><h3><img src="/files/u69/intel_ssd_pro_2500.jpg" alt="Intel SSD Pro 2500" title="Intel SSD Pro 2500" width="228" height="114" style="float: right;" />Affordable storage packed with advanced security features</h3> <p>Intel announced a new addition to its solid state drive (SSD) family, though it's not intended for home consumers. Instead, <strong>Intel's new SSD Pro 2500 Series is intended to bring security features and lower cost of ownership to businesses</strong> in need of the kind of "blazing fast" performance SSDs afford. They'll get that with SSD Pro 2500 family, which comes in capacities ranging from 120GB to 480GB.</p> <p>Performance teeters on the upper end of the spectrum with sequential read and write speeds rated at up to 540MB/s and 490MB/s, respectively. Random 4KB read performance checks in at up to 48,000 IOPS, while writes ramp up to 80,000 IOPS, Intel says.</p> <p>In addition to respectable performance metrics, <a href="http://newsroom.intel.com/community/intel_newsroom/blog/2014/07/22/intel-solid-state-drive-pro-2500-series-brings-trusted-security-features-and-lower-cost-of-ownership-to-business" target="_blank">Intel says</a> the SSD Pro 2500 Series offers five low power modes for long battery life. The lower power states can reduce idel power consumption by more than 90 percent compared to a typical mobile hard disk drive.</p> <p>The drives also feature hardware-based 256-bit AES encryption and come in both M.2 and 2.5-inch form factors, all backed by 5-year warranties.</p> <p>No word yet on price.</p> <p><em>Follow Paul on <a href="https://plus.google.com/+PaulLilly?rel=author" target="_blank">Google+</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/paul_b_lilly" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/Paul.B.Lilly" target="_blank">Facebook</a></em></p> http://www.maximumpc.com/intel_launches_business_class_solid_state_drive_pro_2500_series#comments Build a PC enterprise Hardware intel solid state drive ssd ssd pro 2500 storage News Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:01:09 +0000 Paul Lilly 28216 at http://www.maximumpc.com Newegg Daily Deals: Samsung 840 Evo 1TB SSD, Intel Core i5 4690K, and More! http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_samsung_840_evo_1tb_ssd_intel_core_i5_4690k_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/samsung_840_evo_ssd_0.jpg" alt="Samsung Evo 1TB SSD" title="Samsung Evo 1TB SSD" width="300" height="285" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>Back in the day, just the thought of a 1TB solid state drive would send wallets into hiding. Luckily for the enthusiast community, NAND flash memory pricing fell off a cliff, and nowadays there's no reason to pay anywhere near $1 per gigabyte, let alone way over that amount like it used to be. Now that prices have settled considerably, you might find yourself in the market for a large capacity SSD. If so, check out today's top deal for a <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147251&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-SSD-N82E16820147251-_-0722&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Samsung 840 Evo 2.5-inch 1TB MLC Internal Solid State Drive</a> for <strong>$400</strong> with free shipping (normally $470 - use coupon conde: [<strong>EMCPCHH232</strong>]). It's not just capacious, it's also fast -- up to 540MB/s sequential read and up to 520MB/s sequential write performance!</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117372&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819117372-_-0722&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i5-4690K Haswell Quad-Core 3.5GHz LGA 1150 Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$240</strong> with free shipping (normally $240; USD $20 Promotional Gift Card w/ Purchase, limited offer)</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116900&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819116900-_-0722&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i7-4770 Haswell Quad-Core 3.4GHz LGA 1150 84W Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$295</strong> with free shipping (normally $310 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHH23</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130921&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-GPU-N82E16814130921-_-0722&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">EVGA SuperClocked w/ ACX Cooling GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card</a> for <strong>$320</strong> with free shipping (normally $340 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHH29</strong>]; Free Watch Dogs w/ purchase, limited offer)</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236404&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-INT-HDD-N82E16822236404-_-0722&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">WD Green 2TB IntelliPower 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5-inch Internal Hard Drive</a> for <strong>$75</strong> with free shipping (normally $85 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCHH229</strong>])</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_samsung_840_evo_1tb_ssd_intel_core_i5_4690k_and_more#comments Daily Deals daily deals evga intel Newegg samsung wd Western Digital Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:43:30 +0000 The Maximum PC Staff 28215 at http://www.maximumpc.com Online Retailer Tips Potential Pricing for Intel's Haswell-E Processors http://www.maximumpc.com/online_retailer_tips_potential_pricing_intels_haswell-e_processors_2014 <!--paging_filter--><h3><img src="/files/u69/intel_truck_1.jpg" alt="Intel Truck" title="Intel Truck" width="228" height="150" style="float: right;" />Take these prices with a grain of salt</h3> <p>It's a bit early to go shopping for Intel's Haswell-E parts, though that doesn't mean you can't start planning your back-to-school build, especially if you can find the prices of upcoming parts. <strong>While Haswell-E CPUs are expected to debut in September, at least one online retailer in the U.S. has gone and posted pricing information</strong> for three upcoming SKUs, all of which are available to pre-order.</p> <p>A shout out goes to <a href="http://www.cpu-world.com/news_2014/2014071501_Pre-order_prices_of_Intel_Haswell-E_processors.html" target="_blank"><em>CPU-World</em></a> for discovering the pre-order parts on on <a href="http://www.shopblt.com/search/order_id=%2521ORDERID%2521&amp;s_max=25&amp;t_all=1&amp;s_all=CM80648" target="_blank"><em>Shopblt.com</em></a>. At the time of this writing, here are the Haswell-E parts and prices the e-tailer is pushing:</p> <ul> <li>Intel Core i7 5960X Extreme Edition (8-core, 3.5GHz, 20MB cache): $1,107.83</li> <li>Intel Core i7 5930K (6-core, 3.7GHz, 15MB cache): $631.54</li> <li>Intel Core i7 5820K (6-core, 3.6GHz, 15MB cache): $425.92</li> </ul> <p>Intel's first-ever 8-core desktop processor (5960X) is priced at $1,107.83 at <em>Shopblt</em>, which is $16 more than the 4960X in the same store. Expensive, sure, but not a bad price difference for two additional cores, more L2 cache, more memory bandwidth, and general architecture improvements.</p> <p>Meanwhile, both six-core chips are priced somewhat competitively with the processors they're replacing -- the 5930K is $49 more than the 4930K, and the 5820K is $80 more than 4820K in the same store.</p> <p><em>Follow Paul on <a href="https://plus.google.com/+PaulLilly?rel=author" target="_blank">Google+</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/paul_b_lilly" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/Paul.B.Lilly" target="_blank">Facebook</a></em></p> http://www.maximumpc.com/online_retailer_tips_potential_pricing_intels_haswell-e_processors_2014#comments Build a PC core i7 5820k core i7 5930k core i7 5960x cpu Hardware haswell-e intel processor News Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:51:40 +0000 Paul Lilly 28193 at http://www.maximumpc.com Intel's Strong Revenue Forecast Sends Stock Price Soaring to 10-Year High http://www.maximumpc.com/intels_strong_revenue_forecast_sends_stock_price_soaring_10-year_high_2014 <!--paging_filter--><h3><img src="/files/u69/intel_building.jpg" alt="Intel" title="Intel" width="228" height="171" style="float: right;" />The sky isn't falling, after all</h3> <p>Analysts can talk about the post PC era until they're blue in the face, Intel will continue to cash checks either way. Big ones, at that. <strong>Intel reported second-quarter revenue of $13.8 billion</strong>, up 8 percent for $12.8 billion in the same quarter a year ago. That translates into a $2.8 billion profit for the quarter, which is 40 percent higher than the $2 billion profit it recorded in Q2 2013.</p> <p>"Our second-quarter results showed the strength of our strategy to extend the reach of Intel technology from the data center to PCs to the Internet of Things," <a href="http://newsroom.intel.com/community/intel_newsroom/blog/2014/07/15/intel-reports-second-quarter-revenue-of-138-billion" target="_blank">said Intel CEO Brian Krzanich</a>. "With the ramp of our Baytrail SoC family, we have expanded into new segments such as Chrome-based systems, and we are on track to meet our 40 million unit tablet goal. In addition, we hit an important qualification milestone for our upcoming 14nm Broadwell product, and expect the first systems to be on shelves during the holidays."</p> <p>Intel may have been slow to recognize the consumer shift into mobile, but has since been able to gain a strong foothold in the segment. Still, the PC market has been kind to Intel -- the company's PC Client Group recorded revenue of $8.7 billion in Q2, up 9 percent sequentially and 6 percent year-over-year. Meanwhile, it's Mobile and Communications Group actually saw its revenue fall 67 percent sequentially to $51 million.</p> <p>Looking ahead, Intel is forecasting $14.4 billion in revenue for Q3 and growth of approximately 5 percent for the full year. Investors reacted positively to the quarterly results and revenue forecast -- Intel's stock price is up 7 percent today at $33.93, which is higher than it's been for the past decade.</p> <p><em>Follow Paul on <a href="https://plus.google.com/+PaulLilly?rel=author" target="_blank">Google+</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/#!/paul_b_lilly" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="http://www.facebook.com/Paul.B.Lilly" target="_blank">Facebook</a></em></p> http://www.maximumpc.com/intels_strong_revenue_forecast_sends_stock_price_soaring_10-year_high_2014#comments Hardware intel revenue stock News Wed, 16 Jul 2014 16:21:44 +0000 Paul Lilly 28175 at http://www.maximumpc.com Newegg Daily Deals: MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming Motherboard, Intel Core i5 3470 CPU, and More! http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_msi_z87-gd65_gaming_motherboard_intel_core_i5_3470_cpu_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/msi_mobo_thumb.jpg" alt="MSI Motherboard" title="MSI Motherboard" width="300" height="170" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>Rome wasn't built in a day, but you can build a in PC well within that time and play Total War: Rome or Rome II on your new component empire. It all starts with a solid foundation, and if you're looking for one, check out today's top deal for an <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130692&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-MOBO-N82E16813130692-_-0716&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming Motherboard</a> for <strong>$125</strong> with free shipping (normally $150 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE34</strong>]; additional $20 mail-in-rebate). This socket LGA 1150 board offers native support for USB 3.0 and SATA 6Gbps, and can run multiple graphics cards.</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824009626&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-DISPLAY-N82E16824009626-_-0716&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Acer 27-inch WQHD 6ms (GTG) HDMI Widescreen LED Backlight LCD Monitor</a> for <strong>$330</strong> with free shipping (normally $350 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE237</strong>])</p> <p><a href="3.6GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 77W Desktop Processor (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115234&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819115234-_-0716&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i5-3470 Ivy Bridge Quad-Core 3.2GHz</a> for $180 with free shipping (normally $190 - use coupon code: [EMCPCWE29])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487003&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-GPU-N82E16814487003-_-0716&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti Superclocked 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 Video Card</a> for <strong>$650</strong> with free shipping (normally $660; additional $10 Mail-in Rebate)</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139024&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CASE-N82E16811139024-_-0716&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Corsair Obsidian 750D Black ATX Full Tower Computer Case</a> for <strong>$120</strong> with free shipping (normally $150 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE234</strong>]; additional $20 Mail-in Rebate)</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_msi_z87-gd65_gaming_motherboard_intel_core_i5_3470_cpu_and_more#comments Acer corsair Daily Deals daily deals evga intel msi Newegg Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:35:37 +0000 The Maximum PC Staff 28173 at http://www.maximumpc.com Newegg Daily Deals: Samsung 840 Evo 500GB SSD, Intel Core i5 3570K, and More! http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_samsung_840_evo_500gb_ssd_intel_core_i5_3570k_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/samsung_840_evo_ssd_0.jpg" alt="Samsung 840 Evo 500GB SSD" title="Samsung 840 Evo 500GB SSD" width="300" height="285" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>Here's the thing -- if you develop emotional attachments to inanimate objects, you don't have to say goodbye to your hard drive. You really don't. Heck, you don't even have to hurt its feelings by forcing it into retirement. Give it a promotion and a new title, like Senior VP of Storage, and then use it store photos, videos, and the such. That clears the way to get an SSD for your OS, which will make your system fly like you always knew it was capable of. Need ideas? Check out today's top deal for a <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147249&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-SSD-N82E16820147249-_-0715&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Samsung 840 Evo 500GB SSD</a> for <strong>$230</strong> with free shipping (normally $260 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE23</strong>]). This speed drive brings sequential read/write speeds of up to 540Mbps/520Mbps to the daily grind.</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236112&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-DISPLAY-N82E16824236112-_-0715&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Asus 23.6-inch 2ms Full HD HDMI LED BackLight LCD Monitor</a> for <strong>$120</strong> with free shipping (normally $160 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE24</strong>]; additional $20 Mail-in rebate)</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819116504-_-0715&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge Quad-Core 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$220</strong> with free shipping (normally $230 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE28</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119260&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CASE-N82E16811119260-_-0715&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">CM Storm Stryker - White Full Tower Gaming Computer Case with Handle and External 2.5-inch Drive Dock</a> for <strong>$120</strong> with free shipping (normally $155 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE33</strong>]; additional $15 Mail-in rebate)</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132124&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-MOBO-N82E16813132124-_-0715&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Asus Sabertooth Z97 MARK1 LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard</a> for <strong>$229</strong> with free shipping (normally $239 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWE35</strong>])</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_samsung_840_evo_500gb_ssd_intel_core_i5_3570k_and_more#comments asus cm Cooler Master Daily Deals daily deals intel Newegg samsung Tue, 15 Jul 2014 16:58:44 +0000 The Maximum PC Staff 28169 at http://www.maximumpc.com Newegg Daily Deals: AMD FX-8320 Vishera, Intel Core i5 4460 Haswell, and More! http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_amd_fx-8320_vishera_intel_core_i5_4460_haswell_and_more <!--paging_filter--><p><img src="/files/u69/amd_fx_chip_0.jpg" alt="AMD FX" title="AMD FX" width="300" height="217" style="float: right;" /><img src="/files/u154082/newegg_logo_small.png" alt="newegg logo" title="newegg logo" width="200" height="80" /></p> <p><strong>Top Deal:</strong></p> <p>Imagine if Jack had traded his mother's cow for a chip instead of three magical beans. Not just any chip, mind you, but an 8-core chip carefully crafted on a 32nm manufacturing process. Had it been thrown out the window, it might have grown into a towering AMD system, and who knows where the story would have gone from there. Want to find out? Then consider today's top deal for an <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113285&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819113285-_-0714&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">AMD FX-8320 Vishera 8-Core Processor</a> for <strong>$150</strong> with free shipping (normally $160 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWP26</strong>]). We don't recommend tossing it out the window, but it sure would go nicely with a socket AM3+ motherboard.</p> <p><strong>Other Deals:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117302&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CPU-N82E16819117302-_-0714&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Intel Core i5-4460 Haswell Quad-Core 3.2GHz LGA 1150 Desktop Processor</a> for <strong>$180</strong> with free shipping (normally $190 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWP97</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147158&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-CASE-N82E16811147158-_-0714&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Rosewill THOR V2-White Edition, THOR V2-W Gaming ATX Full Tower Computer Case</a> for <strong>$100</strong> with free shipping (normally $140 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWP44</strong>])</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236102&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-DISPLAY-N82E16820231503-_-0714&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">Asus 24-inch 2ms Full HD HDMI LED Backlight LCD Monitor</a> for <strong>$145</strong> with free shipping (normally $180 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWP59</strong>]; additional $20 Mail-in rebate)</p> <p><a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231503&amp;cm_mmc=BAC-MaximumPC-_-DailyDeals-_-RAM--_-0714&amp;nm_mc=ExtBanner&amp;AID=5555555" target="_blank">G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 2133 (PC3 17000) Desktop Memory</a> for <strong>$153</strong> with free shipping (normally $170 - use coupon code: [<strong>EMCPCWP36</strong>])</p> http://www.maximumpc.com/newegg_daily_deals_amd_fx-8320_vishera_intel_core_i5_4460_haswell_and_more#comments amd asus Daily Deals daily deals g.skill intel Newegg rosewill Mon, 14 Jul 2014 13:14:33 +0000 Paul Lilly 28158 at http://www.maximumpc.com