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The Intel DZ87KLT-75K includes a USB Wi-Fi/ Bluetooth adapter that attaches to the inside of your drive bays.

LGA1150 is here to stay—get used to it

We’ve seen a mixed reaction to Intel’s new Haswell CPU and LGA1150 socket from enthusiasts. Some, like us, see it as a solid piece of hardware with welcome improvements for the platform if upgrading from older hardware. Others have unfurled “Don’t Reboot Me” flags and refuse to give up on their LGA1155 socket until we pry it from their warm, moist hands.

Note: This review was originally featured in the November 2013 issue of the magazine.

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Google Nexus 7 Review

Google and Asus again teamed up to make the new Nexus 7, and while the physical changes are subtle, they amount to a more sophisticated-looking device.

Same name, new-and-improved experience

It’s hard not to have high expectations of Google’s new Nexus 7—the original was a standout product that offered a satisfying Android experience in a highly portable 7-inch form factor, for less than $200. Now we’ve got the new Nexus 7 (is it us, or is it very annoying that it has the exact same name?) promising a number of refinements to the original, but also asking a higher price: $230 for 16GB, $270 for 32GB (reviewed here). You’re probably wondering if it’s still a compelling product.

Note: This article was originally featured in the December 2013 issue of the magazine

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The doctor tackles Big Coolers, Old Motherboards, IVB vs. SB-E, and more

Too Big?

In the August 2013 issue you indicate that using a third-party, aftermarket CPU cooler is a good idea. I have always had a concern about cooler and fan weight damaging the motherboard. I build in mid- or full-tower cases and it seems that having so much weight hanging from the motherboard risks damage. Is this a valid concern? I would probably use one of the Thermalright coolers designed for an AMD FX-series CPU.

Note: This article was originally featured in our November 2013 issue of the magazine.

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Silverstone Tundra TD02 Review

The TD02 gets points for style and toughness, but the extra-thick radiator may not fit in your case.Worth the weight

If you’ve been following the CPU-cooling market over the past year or so, you’ve probably noticed some stagnation. Multiple vendors license a design from a few manufacturers, resulting in a roughly identical product. Sometimes the fan control software is the same program with a different skin. Wouldn’t it be nice to shake things up a bit? Silverstone seems to think so, and it seems to understand that it’s not just about looking fancy.

Note: This review was originally featured in the November 2013 issue of the magazine.