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Silverstone Temjin TJ04-E Review

Keep it simple, stupid

Silverstone’s TJ04-E is a modern take on a classic ATX mid-tower. It doesn’t even have a weird motherboard orientation. That’s not to say it’s boring.

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Antec Eleven Hundred Review

Goes far, but not all the way

In a weird twist, Antec has delivered a case that’s both full on features and lacking in some of the company’s staple design elements. Take, for example, the case’s built-in fan controller—or lack thereof. We’re used to being able to flick switches to independently control all of the fans within an Antec chassis, but after connecting a Molex to the provided circuit board in the Eleven Hundred—annoyance number one—we were displeased to find that the switch only turns the top 20cm fan’s blue LED on and off. You can’t physically adjust the speed of that or the case’s rear 12cm fan.

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May 2012: Build a PC on Any Budget

May issue

In the PDF archive of the May 2012 issue you can find:

  • Build a PC on Any Budget
  • Windows 8 on ARM
  • Cloud Services Showdown: Google vs. Amazon vs. Microsoft vs. Apple
  • Alienware X51 PC
  • How to Encrypt Your External Drive
  • Head to Head: Razer Naga vs. Mad Catz Cyborg M.M.O. 7
  • And Reviews of the Latest Hardware

Click the cover image on the right to download the PDF archive today!

 

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Skype vs. Google Video Chat

skype

Skype vs. Google Video Chat

The sheer power of video is well-known; we all remember what it did to radio back in the ’80s, after all. But what would happen if video picked a fight with video? Curious, we tossed two of the top video chat options into a cage to determine the superior specimen. Skype may be the big man on campus, but Google's scrappy video calling plugin delivers the same features from within the Google ecosystem. There can be only one!

Note: This article was taken from the September issue of the magazine

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Max Payne 3 Review

The even bigger fall of Max Payne

Max Payne is a man who’s insanely uncomfortable inside his own skin. He’s still haunted by the death of his family, and in Max Payne 3, his body—more so than any random member of Brazil’s criminal underbelly—is the target of his most vicious attacks. Booze. Pills. Booze. Pills. Booze. Pills. Perhaps the most self-destructive character gaming has ever seen, Max is a ticking time bomb of good intentions and life’s harsh realities. And, for better or worse, so is this game. It claws desperately at greatness in so many places—a gripping cinematic narrative, real character development, a Rockstar-worthy world, utterly sublime shooting—but narrowly manages to fall short every time. In slow-mo.

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Razer Tiamat 7.1 Gaming Headset Review

Extreme headset pushes surround-sound envelope

With the Tiamat 7.1, Razer is redefining the top end of the gaming audio line. Where previous headsets have had trouble creating a surround gaming experience through just two drivers, the Tiamat fits what is essentially an entire surround sound system into each earcup, with five individual drivers, including a sub. You’ll need a 5.1- or 7.1-capable analog sound subsystem with three outputs to take advantage of the surround (and at $180, the set’s not worth it if you can’t), but if you’ve got the hardware this is the new headset to beat.

Each earcup on the Tiamat 7.1 features five individual drivers, which are visible through the side windows

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Dropcam HD Review

It doesn’t get any easier than this

When we hear hype that something is the “easiest” thing in the world to set up, we usually put on our hip waders and prepare to slog through a waist-high pile of dung, because 19 times out of 20, it's usually a load of crap.

Well, believe us when we say that the Dropcam HD is the easiest Internet camera  we’ve ever set up. We mean it. To set up the Dropcam HD, you just plug the camera into your PC via USB. The setup files are stored in flash, which kicks up a configuration utility. This lets you create an account with Dropcam and connect the device to a Wi-Fi network. Once you’ve done that, you unplug the Dropcam HD, move it to the area you want to monitor, and plug it in via the included 2-amp wall wart. That’s it; you’re done and streaming 720p video to the Internet in about two minutes flat. The lens is a wide 107 degrees, which is enough to let you see most of a room. The video quality is good, and while certainly far better than QVGA surveillance cams, the compression is heavy enough that you won’t be picking out license plates with it.

The Dropcam can be removed from the unique mount, if needed.