chassis

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NZXT Switch 810 Review

NZXT’s Switch 810 is aptly named: This toolless steel chassis is an excellent choice whether you’re indulging in extreme air cooling, radical water cooling, or near-silent running. It’s beautiful to behold no matter how you set it up, with white plastic panels that can be removed with a simple press of your fingertips.

The 22.3‑inch‑long by 23.5‑inch‑tall by 8.5‑inch‑wide chassis supports multiple platforms including ATX, microATX, Mini-ITX, E-ATX, XL-ATX, and Flex ATX mobo configurations. There’s plenty of room inside, with nine PCIe slots running in parallel with four tube cutouts, and plenty of convenient cable‑routing options. The Switch 810’s motherboard tray features 10 rubber-grommeted cutouts and an oversize 8-pin cable-routing hole. There’s enough room at the top of the case to fit a 60mm thick, 360mm radiator with push-pull fans. If you opt for a quiet configuration, you can slide the top-panel fan vents closed to reduce noise.

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Xigmatek Elysium Review

Xigmatek’s Elysium is fricking huge. At 24.3 inches tall, 9 inches wide, a whopping 26.1 inches deep, and weighing more than 34 pounds, this monstrous full-tower enclosure is among the largest we’ve seen. Its cavernous interior can accommodate HPTX, XL-ATX, E-ATX, ATX, microATX, and Mini-ITX mobo configurations—and you can mount a second PSU at either the top or bottom for those power-hungry HPTX builds. The Elysium has 10 PCIe slots, and you can fit a 12.2-inch GPU with room to spare. But all that interior vertical space is a double-edged sword: We had to mount our PSU in the top bay, because its 8-pin ATX 12V cable wasn’t long enough to reach the motherboard from the bottom.

Twelve 5.25-inch drive bays adorn the front of the case. Two four-bay drive cages in the lower half are secured with thumbscrews and can be moved or removed, but the two 12cm front fans mounted to them must go along for the ride. Drives must be secured inside the cages with screws, and all the bays are secured using finicky plastic mechanisms. The case weirdly lacks any 2.5-inch drive mounts, so you’ll need to spring for your own adapters if you’re using SSDs.

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Silverstone Temjin TJ08-E Review

SILVERSTONE'S TEMJIN TJ08-E is a microATX chassis that strikes a nearly perfect balance between practicality and performance. The TJ08-E is fabricated primarily from steel, but its front panel is brushed aluminum, with two USB 3.0 ports (with an internal header), a mic input, a headphone output, and power and reset switches. The front I/O ports are located beneath the two 5.25-inch drive bays and above the chassis’ only fan, an 18cm Air Penetrator concealed behind a large mesh cover. The fan features an on/off switch built into the side of the case, and there’s a large removable dust filter between the mesh cover and the fan.

The TJ08-E is surprisingly roomy for a small form factor chassis. Although it measures just 8.26 inches wide, 15.2 inches long, and 14.7 inches tall, it provides enough interior space to accommodate a GTX 590 videocard without having to move anything. The TJ08-E also provides four internal hard drive slots, a single 2.5-inch mounting bracket, and a dual-purpose 3.5-inch drive bay. We had no problem popping our full-size drives into the bays and securing them with screws, although the backs of the drives protrude from the rear of the hard drive cage. The hard drive cage can be completely removed, in case you need extra room, and a CPU-cooler support at the bottom of the case will prevent a large heatsink from banging against its floor.