cameras

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FujiFilm F40fd

If you are all about achieving the highest possible image quality (even at the expense  of other features), Fuji’s F40fd is the camera in this roundup for you.

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Olympus Stylus 780

Olympus’s Stylus 780 packs a 7.1 megapixel sensor, a 5x optical zoom, a crisp 2.5-inch LCD, and face-detection technology into a weatherproof camera body that is slightly larger but more stylish than the Sony DSC-W80’s.

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Sony Cyber-shot DCS W80

Sony’s 7.2 megapixel DSC-W80 boots quickly, and its 3x zoom lens focuses with minimal shutter delay. Plus, this cam includes a traditional, if tiny, optical viewfinder!

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iControl Advanced Starter Kit

This month, we also reviewed the larger of iControl’s two starter kits, which consists of a wireless camera, a motion detector, an Intermatic Z-Wave lamp module, a door/window detector, a motion detector, a keychain remote, and a control module that plugs into your wireless router.

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WiLife Lukwerks Surveillance Starter Kit

We nearly slapped WiLife’s Spy Camera Starter Kit with a Geek Tested: Disapproved label when we checked it out in our May 2007 issue. The camera was poorly disguised in the massive body of a fugly digital clock. But the company’s software was so impressive that we called in its Indoor Camera Starter Kit ($300) and an add-on outdoor camera ($230) for a full review.
Each of WiLife’s cameras uses HomePlug powerline networking, so you need only plug the cameras into wall outlets, hook a USB receiver to your PC, and install the software. We had a two-camera system up and working within 15 minutes.

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Kodak EasyShare V570

Ever have that problem where you want to take a nice group picture of your friends, say at the Grand Canyon, and you just can’t get ‘em all in the frame? So you ask them to keep backing up a step and before you know it… oops!

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Canon EOS 5D

Look into the viewfinder of a consumer-grade digital SLR and you’ll notice a startling difference compared with a film camera and the same lens: Your view is cropped, in much the same way black bars crop a widescreen movie to fit an older TV.

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