Is Your Next PC a Tablet?

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wdaytoncd

@ Alex Castle,

I'm an owner of a Surface Pro 128gb.

Do you understand scaling on the desktop? You do realize that you can custom scale the desktop to 400% or more if you want to.

Why did you say it can only be scaled to 150%? Are you not accustom to windows desktop features?

I felt that needed to be pointed out. Because you can use desktop easily with touch if you scale it right.

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lordfirefox

My next PC is going to be the PC I already have plus an upgrade. Currently I have an AM3+ capable motherboard but running an AM2+ CPU on it (the nice thing about AMD is backwards compatibility). So all it needs really is an AM3+ CPU plopped in.

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PCLinuxguy

and maybe a bios update/flash to accept the new cpu (normal for AMD boards due to being backwards compatible) what CPU will you update it to?

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Weo

I've used a laptop for about 20 years for primarily school and now business applications. Because of the limited upgradability and steep prices for new tech, I kept my "enhanced" needs dedicated to a desktop.

That being said, considering the average Maximum PC reader is probably an "early adopter" of software and hardware, I understand why the comments seem so negative.

I supplemented my other computers for a budget Android tablet, and fell in love for two reasons. 1. I could go almost an entire day of working both on research papers, reading relative text and articles, and edit MS Office docs without worrying about being within 10 feet of an outlet. 2. The form factor (7") worked well enough for reading, and made it MUCH easier to haul around, bike, boat, plane, etc.

Although the Android tablet had apps for minimal MS Office doc, photo, and video editing, there were still some short falls that required a full Windows OS... such as password protected Adobe files necessary for certain academic electronic media subscriptions, extensive Excel spreadsheets, and extensive PowerPoint presentations.

For my last business trip (1 month, 5 states) I kept my 15" laptop at home, and was able to do everything I needed to do except intensive gaming on the Atom tablet. I even used MS's free photo and video editor with success. I think the majority of consumers are looking for this, which is the exact opposite of the average Maximum PC subscriber. Of course, the Atom processor works for close to 8 hours, while the above article’s MS tablet has a more powerful processor with shorter run time.

If you own a Porsche, it doesn't mean that a Ford or Chevy compact, economy car isn't going to sell better. Considering the multitude of computer/laptop users that have ditched PC's for a non-Windows tablet OS, I think Microsoft's tablets offer more variety between a desktop and phone for portable computing. On the other hand, for long trips with large photo and video editing requirements (and occasional gaming) I will bring along a big, heavy, gaming laptop WITH my tablet.

Think about it this way, how many Photo bug forum subscribers would say that phone cameras are replacing DSLR's? How many Maximum PC subscribers use their phone cameras for posts and media instead of a proper DSLR? It's all relative to the users' and their particular needs. What needs serve the mass market is different than the niches.

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Hey.That_Dude

Exactly why I would never get a tablet. I have a phone to do that stuff for me.

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DjVw321

I have a Samsung Slate. Runs Windows 7, and runs wacom drivers for the pen input. I run Photoshop, Zbrush, Maya, and 3DS Max on it. It was a bit pricey, but I think it sure blows the Microsoft Surface out of the water.
Wacom also announced a tablet lineup that is supposed to function as a standalone computer, and a Cintiq monitor. Meaning that you can run it on its own, or plug it into your desktop that does everything better and use it as a monitor...
I don't like the surface, but I like the idea of moving toward a tablet that functions just as well as a desktop, where it can, instead of a toy, like most tablets on the market do today...

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Aksparks04

Can I play skyrim on Ultra settings with 100+ mods installed?
Can I render 3D scenes with Vue or 3DS?
Can I do some video editing?
Can I work on my next web project?

Until tablets become large boxes that allow for expansion and discrete graphics that you can place on your desk, I will not be using one for any other reason than mindlessly surfing the web - which is really their only good use.

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kixofmyg0t

Dude, you play skyrim on Ultra with only 100 mods?

You need to step up your game and play it on modded Ultra Extreme with 300 or more mods at 10240x1440.

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wumpus

My next e-reader will almost certainly be a tablet (the only possible reason not to go that way would be e-ink and ultra-long battery life).

My next computer may well be a tablet, although no way am I paying surface money (worse than the "apple tax") for a tablet. If the thing isn't up to current games (and won't be for a good 5 years), windows loses almost all advantages over android.

My next desktop will be a desktop. It might not need to be tied to a desk (think Occulus Rift), but batteries (if used) will be external lead acid UPS type batteries. It will be made from parts that are clearly derived from current desktop parts, with both CPU and GPU running at least 100W and having 120+mm fans. It will likely sport (multiple) 3.5" spinning hard drives in addition to whatever SSD is used for common (and caching) access. This desktop will likely get the most use (although plenty of surfing and whatnot is migrating to the tablet).

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AFDozerman

No matter how fast the ultraportable class is, there will always be a desktop that is way faster. So, no.

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TheMissingPiece

Most people here seems to be missing the point of the point of the Surface Pro. The Surface Pro isn't meant to be your next gaming rig. It's not meant to be your crazy photo/video editing workstation. What it's meant to be, instead, is a lightweight computer that is extremely portable and can actually multitask properly and can even hold its own in heavier tasks, which is much more than any tablet can do.

Surface Pro looks good in my book. A little expensive, but it's still a good piece of hardware.

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stateofjermaine

"For photographers, the Surface has a lot to offer. It’s the only way you’ll get good portable Photoshop performance in such a small form factor [...]"

I was going to address this excerpt, but I think the comment above is close enough to be also relevant. I don't think everyone is missing the point, so much as we have failed to see the point. There's a difference. In response to the quote above, I find it hard to believe that the MacBook Air, the Zenbook Prime, or the Ativ Book 9 would not be considered as "small a form factor" as the Surface Pro. I think for any photography professional, the size difference would be negligible, and the performance and usability benefits more than worth any imagined size trade-off.

To the post above, I think it's backwards reasoning to say, "Here is a new piece of hardware that is not X, Y, or Z, but make sure you use it for A, and you'll be happy." As an end user, I say, "I need [and already have available] hardware that does X, Y, Z, A, and B, so why do I need this new hardware at all?" Personally, I don't think we do.

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TheMissingPiece

Very fair. Yeah, I don't think the Surface Pro should be used as a primary computer, but more as a supplementary one. Still, the Surface Pro is by no means an underpowered device. It's got a peppy processor, enough RAM and a nice display. I really think that it's simply a touchscreen ultrabook with the keyboard lobbed off. It's perfectly capable as a regular computer. It seems like the fact that it can be used a lot more as a tablet than other touchscreen ultraboooks is throwing people off.

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MaximumMike

double post... I think the reply button is broken... though I guess the possibility exists that I missed it.

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Axel011

Is my next PC a tablet? Absolutely not.

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Ghost XFX

Nope!

As long as I hold my Corsair TX850 in my hands, just try and pry it away from me!

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MaximumMike

double post

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Hey.That_Dude

Short Answer: No.
Long Answer: Hell no.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Is the next tablet a PC?

If it doesn't keep your "personal" data "personal", then it is not a PC, as in "Personal Computer"

If it doesn't run XP or any other X86 compatible O.S. of your choosing, then it isn't even PC Compatible

Do some research and get the terminology right

Is your next Government Sponsored Spyware Platform a Tablet?

Truth in Advertising Baby!
Yeaya

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PCLinuxguy

XP really??
Nothanks I'll take Win 7 and Win 8 over that long dead horse of XP. Sure it was a great OS, but it's already dead (to me) as it was supposed to have been put to pasture already, and Windows 7 is already the 'next Windows XP' as far as user friendliness and global usage.

And there's always Linux...

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basketcase87

The surface pro is x86. Certain OSes might be tough to work with, but it's not going to be x86 compatibility that's the problem. You want personal? Load Linux on it.

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Hey.That_Dude

Did someone forget to take their meds? Honestly when you see that all the governments have cameras that can count the hairs on your head in orbit, have an arm in every bank transaction you ever make, and can call you to go off to get killed whenever they so feel, I wonder why you're only freaking out about your internet security.
There's an easy answer to your OS security, make your own and close up all those darn holes. The answers to the others are significantly less simple.
Don't forget the foil hat!

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Double Post

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appleroxinhouston

Minecraft plays on any computer, guys...

For non-action gaming (action being fps, tps, mmo, etc) this would be fine with a decent mouse.

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Techrocket9

You know, there are some Wacom drivers floating around on the internet that give you pressure sensitivity in Adobe applications on the Surface Pro...

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PCWolf

As a "Power User" A Tablet for me is way to weak to do anything serious on it. When I Play my REAL games, or Encode my HD Videos, or do my Folding @ Home, no McWeaksauce tablet will ever be able to fill those needs. Tablets are great for simple things such as Watching movies, web surfing, or listening to music while waste away on FaceBook. Also, tablets will never be accepted in the work place. Who's going to replace a bunch of Desktops in the Office with a bunch of weak tablets with touch screens that are way to easy to steal? Tablets are great for portability, but real computing work is done on a desktop. Also, iOS sucks due to the fact you have to use iTunes to do everything & Androids Security Flaws & inability to let you manage what starts up with your device is a bad joke. Not to mention, it's AD infested Apps are annoying. I will stick with my Power Rig at home & use the Tablet when I go on a long flight or to a Doctors Appointment.

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richeemxx

For the most part I couldn't agree more. However having been in the sales side of the industry for years and seeing how the trends are, we are more of a dying breed. Most PC users can care less about raw power. So for most people they'll stay away from a traditional desktop environment and stick to tablets or laptops.

Businesses aren't going to change, partially for the reasons you stated, but also because they are moving towards BYOD. Why invest capital in a bunch of newer devices if your employees can bring their own?

I have all of the above. I like my tablet for basic everyday BS, but try to work from it. Not going to happen! Even a long drawn out post like this or several FB messages and I'm wanting my full keyboard and mouse back.

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PCWolf

BYOD would be a bad idea for any company, as that would mean that you would have to use your own personal device for work related duties, & not be compensated for it. Wht new Employee wants to hear
"you'll need to Buy your own $400+ Tablet to work here & were not paying for it" I don't think we will see that for a long time, but I could be wrong.

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maverick knight

BYOD? maybe for really small business that doesn't care about their product. IT department most be a nightmare or nonexistent.

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leftfield2263

I have been using the Surface Pro 128GB this past semester in Engineering and I am loving it so far. Looking forward to seeing an extended battery of some sort though as it can be difficult to find an outlet not being used at school.

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bjoswald

Only when Ubuntu Touch is ported to the one I already have!

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PCWolf

Why would you want a Tablet with Unbuntu? Tablets don't have the power to run Unbuntu, & then run some sort of emulator so you can run all the software you can't run on Unbuntu. Tablets are McWeaksauce!

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Did you miss this article in Max PC?

"Teens Growing More Aware of Mobile App Privacy Issues"

How about any of my security Rants?

Does XP install fine on this tablet or are we forced to use Spyware Platform 8?

Yeah, I think I'll just stick with secure computing platforms for now

Thanks anyway

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Exarkun1138

Oh, jeez. Are you still on that tired old rant about XP? Give it a break. XP is dead, THANK GOD, and Windows 7 blows it's doors off so far, it'd take you months just to locate the pieces!

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jbitzer

No offense, but ranting about security and wanting to install XP makes about as as much sense as screen doors on a battleship.

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Orlbuckeye

How about a ship with Tom Hanks as the captain and no guns on it near the shores of Somalia.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

"ranting about security and wanting to install XP makes about as as much sense as screen doors on a battleship"

I don't get viruses or malware with XP, and I have not had a blue screen of death for years after learning the secret

Can you block "ALL" Microsoft components from accessing the Internet while you surf with Spyware 7 or 8?

Diddn't think so

Try closing all "YOUR" screen doors before telling me my fortress is insecure

I do, however agree with you that XP is VERY insecure for a noob

I find it mindboggling why anyone like you would want a bunch of Government Monkeys running around in their computer by using screendoor 7 or 8

Tell me, why do you think that is OK?

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jbitzer

I don't think it's ok, but that's more an issue to take up with the government monkeys, not the OS.

of course, my paranoia only extends to the death of civil liberties, not people spying in my computer. I hope you never browse the internet or send email either, since your ISP is just going to turn over all your info anyway.

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jbitzer

I don't think it's ok, but that's more an issue to take up with the government monkeys, not the OS.

of course, my paranoia only extends to the death of civil liberties, not people spying in my computer. I hope you never browse the internet or send email either, since your ISP is just going to turn over all your info anyway.

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jbitzer

The "secret" is the only secure system you have is the one completely disconnected from any network, I'd prefer one that still gets patches, but that's just me. I'll bet you use weird diet and auto insurance tricks too.

I don't get viruses or malware either, of course, I attribute that to not being an idiot, not the OS I'm using.

Keep on trollin in that XP box.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/After-Ten-Years-It-s-Time-to-Let-Windows-XP-Go-218509.shtml

http://www.zdnet.com/gartner-prepare-now-for-windows-xp-death-security-at-risk-7000014164/

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Exarkun1138

Moose is some weird XP Fanatic, and he actually thinks XP is the most secure OS from Microsoft. Let him continue with that untrue belief. I'd ignore him from now on if I were you. He's not worth the time.

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PCWolf

The fact that I cant stop Apps from auto starting up on a non jailbroken Android Device, along with me not being able to stop an App from sending all my contacts & my phone number to the "Mother Ship" shows me that Google could care less about Privacy Issues. Not to mention that HUGE Security Flaw that was discovered recently that Google is just telling people "Just download from the Play Store & you will be OK" instead of fixing it shows they also don't care about Security. Only reason I even use Android is because I Hate Apple & iTunes more.

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MaximumMike

Ummmm... every Android device is non jailbroken, as jailbreaking doesn't exist on Android.

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vrmlbasic

Semantics? IMO rooting : Android :: jailbreaking : iOS

I believe that it was a gross oversight on Google's part to not allow selective permissions when installing apps. As it stands now, an app either gets every single permission it asks for or it doesn't get installed. Google tells us that no malware would ever make it to Play Store, so we don't have to worry about malware, but even so what if I don't want an app to have location access? Why can't I give it a spoofed location if it should require one?

Sigh. Google.

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MaximumMike

>>I believe that it was a gross oversight on Google's part to not allow selective permissions when installing apps.

I agree completely. That's probably the one thing I absolutely don't like about Android.

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Hey.That_Dude

"Line Item Vetos" generally don't work very well in a program. Often it's coded in such a way that it needs all or it's broken. As a programer I've been guilty of few of these instances. It just requires way more coding for the same effect with "opt out" for every little thing than for say "herm, don't have access to that... Throw error, catch it, and then get the hell out of dodge".

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MaximumMike

No offense, but that logic is exactly what's wrong with software development today. And I'm not knocking you for doing it in some Android app. But when developers who write apps we all use, like web browsers for instance, do this it opens the door for unwanted exploits. Many security exploits exist because some developer didn't want to code for all the possibilities.

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Hey.That_Dude

That's not entirely fair. It's almost impossible to predict what is necessary. It's a miracle that different phones can even run the same software. After all ARM is Memory Mapped IO. One man's G6 is another man's I9 is another man's Q1. There has to be some amount of flexability in the program or you'd be screwed on the hardware. On top of that there is run time considerations and just plain and simple inability to predict, as a humans, how different modules will integrate into each other. Managing a few KLOCs (thousand lines of code) among even a small number of people is a nightmare. At some point you just have to say "I'm sorry. NO. You're not allowed to do that. ERROR! ERROR! DELETE! EXTERMINATE!" *pew pew*

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MaximumMike

It's not that I don't agree with what you're saying. I agree that at some point your application has to just say, "we're not going to do that." But I'm actually talking about the opposite, where some developer says, "let me do this or my app won't run."

The introduction of popup's into web browsers is a prime example. Once web developers found out about them, their use became prolific almost over night. Suddenly most of the internet wouldn't work if you didn't enable popups. And we all know what a spyware nightmare that turned into. It worked itself out eventually and its not as big of an issue anymore. But think how many spyware infestations and botnets owe their existence to popups, because a ton of lazy web developers wouldn't code their websites to work properly if the end user had popup's disabled - forcing users to open themselves up to a security flaw.

So, it's this mentality that, "my stuff won't work unless you give me access to whatever I want," that I have issue with. In today's ever evolving, mobile, modularized market that approach doesn't really cut it anymore. Developers should begin asking themselves, "is this access critical to what my application does, and can I make my stuff still work without it? Furthermore, can I design autonomous modules that stand alone so that individual pieces of my application can be enabled or disabled at the user's discretion?" But really they should have been asking themselves this all along. I know it's not easy, but programming isn't supposed to be. Cookie cutter programming is a bad idea. Lazy developers who aren't willing to learn new concepts and think about how their code might be used in the future should probably exit the industry, imho.

And no, I am not in any way implying that this is you. It's just that your initial statement triggered one of my pet peeves, of which I have many.

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Hey.That_Dude

I get that. Most programers aren't security minded. Not to mention each language has different abilities built into the language. Once had a friend do some work in python and he just wanted to name his variables, turns out he named half of them with reserved terms. Always fun to watch that. Anyways, people aren't taught to think "secure" they're taught to thing "dear god I have 5 min. left! can I just get it to work? POUND THE KEYS!!!!!!!!!"... at least that's how University was for me.