SuperSpeed USB 3.1 Specification is Now Official and Twice as Fast as USB 3.0

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kokytewoqit08

upto I saw the check of $8532, I did not believe that...my... brothers friend woz like they say truly taking home money part-time on there computar.. there sisters neighbour has been doing this 4 only eighteen months and by now took care of the morgage on their house and got a great volvo. I went here, > ---- WEP6.COM

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Chad727

When I see thumb/flash drives sporting USB on one end and thunderbolt on the the other, adapters that can go either direction, and sub $75 thunderbolt PCIe adapter cards I'll jump in. Until then, I'm sticking with eSATA for my large data transfers because it actually delivers. I've already gotten burned from buying into the hype over USB 3.0 that didn't come close to delivering. No thanks!

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vrmlbasic

USB 3.0 still isn't as ubiquitous as 2.0 and now we're already moving forward? It wasn't that long ago that we didn't even have a standardized motherboard connector for the USB 3.0 header! At this rate maybe internal hard drives should just sport USB 3.x connectors since SATA has stagnated.

But a 1/10th increase representing a 2x increase in speed is even screwier than MLB's 1/10th = 33%...

Before we buy into 3.1 can we have a timeline for 3.2, which will again double the speed?

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Baer

Thunderbolt might save me 5 minutes a month on average but that would require another set of cables sockets, plugs, cables and devices. Let me think about if that is worth it..... ahhhhh...... Nope!

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PCWolf

+3 Internets

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Insula Gilliganis

Why not call this USB 4?? Good thing it will be "backwards compatible with USB 3.0 and USB 2.0, meaning all your current USB cords and accessories will work just fine with USB 3.1-enabled devices." But have a feeling, to get full 10 Gbps effect, new "3.1 specific" cables will be needed. Also, is the "end color" going to be different? Will be real confusing if it stays blue.. needs to be red or orange!! And I HATE how the peripheral jacks like USB have more bandwidth than SATA!!

Thunderbolt isn't going away anytime soon as it still has its advantages.. faster than USB 3.1, support for fiber-optic cables and the fact that it combines PCI Express and Display Port signals.

Will be looking for this when it is placed on DDR4 motherboards in late 2014 (if we are all so lucky) but, knowing how the world works, it will be left off until much later when it is marketed as an incentive for all of us to upgrade our mobos.

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LatiosXT

You can still technically daisy chain USB devices via hubs. And USB supports 127 devices, including hubs, per channel.

After looking at the specs though, I can see a major reason why Thunderbolt won't be replacing USB any time soon: it's electrical interface is 18V which is way more than what most low bandwidth peripherals can use (or need)

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PCWolf

"18V which is way more than what most low bandwidth peripherals can use (or need)"

I have to disagree with that. To say Thunderbolt will fail because it has too much power means you don't know much about USB's lack of it. If USB had more more power, I would not need Power Bricks to power external Hard Drives, or have to worry about getting a "you do not have enough power" message when plugging up 2 or more power sucking drives to an unpowered USB HUB. I have even had those messages when plugging in 2 Flash Drives in a unpowered HUB! If anything, more power is better.

Thunderbolt could fail more because of it's price & the fact that its not as established as USB. Not because it gives users more power than they need.

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LatiosXT

Hard drives are not "low bandwidth devices". I'm referring to peripherals such as USB thumb drives, mice, cameras (more or less), and the like. They don't need the 18V (as far as I know) provided by Thunderbolt. The only way to make these devices compatible is a voltage regulator... which if I were to take from my college lab experiences, a step down of that size requires a regulator with a heatsink, albeit small. Not something I want on my thumb disk. So if anything, if Thunderbolt is trying to take over as the generic peripheral interface, it's not going to do very well here. But if it's trying to aim for the high speed interface, then sure. It has a shot.

In any case, you also haven't caught up with the USB spec lately. USB 3.0 allows for 5A over the line for charging devices. And I believe a year or so back, the people in charge of the USB specification went "you can go as far as you want with current within safety limits", which an ass pull guess was something like 10 or more amps. So in theory, USB 3.0 has plenty of power to run your hard drives, given the maximum power consumption of a 4TB Seagate Barracuda drive (which is 0.55A@5V and 0.55A@ 12V, or an additional 1.32A@5V if you boost convert it). But for whatever reason, the limitations still remain.

Also from a design standpoint, I would rather go with 5V rather than 18V when building my electronics. Less to step down, and rarely do I need to step up. And many things are happy with 5V.

And the maximum power Thunderbolt can deliver is 10W, since the maximum amperage across the wire per spec is 0.55A. So Thunderbolt by itself can't power your hard drives either.

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PCWolf

I know Hard Drives are not low power devices, & I never said they were, but I have gotten that Not enough Power message when plugging in 2 Sandisk Cruzer USB Thumb Drives on a unpowered Hub. 500ma per port is low, & is a problem when using Hubs. Even USB that come with a power brick need to be able to supply over over 2000ma to be able to feed 500ma to all 4 ports. Yes, USB 3.0 does give more power than 2.0 (I believe it's about 900ma max) but can vary by vendors. I even seen boards that offer 3x power on USB 2.0 ports for faster charging of devices. Your right about the 0.55A on thunderbolt. That's still not enough to power a Hard Drive unless that hard drive was made to run on 0.50A. I Agree that 5v is better than 18v, but I still think USB needs more Amps on it, specially with all these tablets & phones needed so much power to charge, & when friends want to charge their devices on your Comp because they left there chargers at home.

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Baer

Do not confuse voltage and wattage. Higher voltage does not necessary mean that you can pull more power.

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PCWolf

You are correct. Volts & Amps are 2 different things.

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Hey.That_Dude

Both Volts and Amps are still not measures of power. VA and W are both measurements of power one being similar to the other (until conversions are done).

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LatiosXT

If you want to be technical, then sure. But in the electronics field, especially in portables, nobody really uses watts in regards to electrical consumption. It's always amps.

To put this in perspective, watts is like how much horsepower your engine makes. Amps is how much gas the engine sucks up.

I guess volts could be how many pistons you have.

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Hey.That_Dude

I'm more than aware of many different ways of explaining electricity. I do it a lot. However, when comparing disparate technologies with each other watts makes much more sense unless the voltages are understood.

The fact that Thunderbolt doesn't use a computer standard voltage means that there will be converter losses, which in turn means that the difference in VoltAmps and Watts is meaningful. Even the best DC-DC voltage converters are still only about 92% efficient when converting 18V to 12V. It's even worse for 18V to 5V. USB on the other hand has always supported a 5V standard which is also a standard computer voltage, no converter needed.