Steam Machines Pictures and Specs

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Awev

Lets take a look at a few different things.

1. The dumbing down of the general public. Back in the 1980's there was ??-DOS V.vv (that could be PC-DOS 6.2, MS-DOS 2.11, or some other combination, yet you get the idea). It wasn't until Windoze 3.xx before a 2-button mouse became standard, and Apple said C:>\welcome.bat in a full-page ad. That is when people started to go from the command line of DOS to the GUI of Windows.

2. Games, such as Pong, Target Shoot, and others, have been out since the 70's and 80's, when the arcade version of Pong was introduced. You could go to Radio Shack, K-mart, or some other five and dime place, put down $10 - 20, and then hook it up to your TV, or hold it in your hand, and play just one (maybe 3) games. It was fun to watch a couple friends play pong, take the included pistol, and shot the ball as they where playing.

3. Atari 2600 was the first real gaming console that allowed you to change what games it would enable you to play. As in #2 above we see you could buy a console or handheld that would play from 1 to 5 games built in. The Atari 2600 let you maximize your investment in hardware and accessories by purchasing a new game cartage. So, where is the 2600 now days? Maybe in the landfill or behind a glass case somewhere?

4. You could play games on your Apple ][ { |c|e|G}, TRS-80, IBM PC ( |XT|AT}, or even the Commodore 64/128

5. NES, NES 64, Odyssey, the Dream Cast, Atari 2600. Ok, who not only remembers these gaming systems, yet still use them, and can find new games being released for them? Lets throw in XBox, PlayStation, and GameBoy. Are games still being developed for them? What is the support available for them?

6. Apple Newton and Palm TX, PDAs. iPad, Nexus { |4|5|7|10}, Galaxy S4.

7. Nintendo and Sony where already established as gaming platforms of choice before Micro$oft jumped in. Now Nintendo is considered the red-headed step child of the gaming console world.

8. Always-on internet connection, and a motion bar (that doubles as a mic) that has to be connected, you can't trade in (or sale) a game you no longer are playing. Oh, lets not forget that if you are developing a game for the XBox One that it is better to develop and demo it on a Windoze 7 machine, as Win7 is much better than the platform that it is being developed for (true 1080p vs limited, crippled 1080p, system RAM, graphics RAM, cpu [cores, speed, more], etc).

9. Last year I built a computer for a friend to surf the internet. I did so for $189, plus another $90 for Windoze 7. It works, it does what it was designed to do, and does it well. It is slow, yet he doesn't know or care, it serves his needs. I rebuilt my computer around the same time, even took the time to stick it in a new case, and it cost me less than $600, and I am able to play any game I desire, at a nice fps/resolution combination. Yes, neither one is a $9000 - $12,000 system, yet they both work. And I can do more than just play a game or two I my computer, I am able to hook up a camcorder, two more monitors (for a total of three with just one GPU), connect controller, flight stick, track ball, keyboard, and gamer's keypad, to my system.

10. OpenGL on Linux is faster than DirectX (D3D) and OpenGL on Windoze, and looks just as good, if not better, doing so.

11. Linux is more stable than Windoze, and can be customized more (don't need a driver - remove it, want that extra umphoop - compile your own i.e. gentoo).

12. Both Micro$oft and Sony take a loss on each sale of a game console, knowing that they will make up for it in the fees they charge a publisher for the privilege of getting a game released for their console.

13. Nvidia has the Nvidia Experience out, that looks at your CPU, GPU, RAM, monitor, and who knows what else, and can automatically adjust the settings in some games for the best experience available based on what you are currently running. And Nvidia is not the only company doing so.

14. Wal-mart and Track Phones have teamed up to offer us a pre-paid cell phone plan where you purchase your own phone, maybe for more than what you would pay on a two year contract, and saves you a bunch of money in monthly subscription fees.

So, from the above, we can state:

A. Gaming consoles have been around forever, and are pretty dumb machines, with graphics that leave a lot to be desired

B. The more computer uses you want the dumber the interface has to be. An example is Unix begot Linux and M$-DOS, M$-DOS begot Windoze 3, who begot Win 9n, who begot Win XP, who fathered Win 7, who had the bastard child Metro UI. Linux begot KDE, Gnome, Android, and Mac OS/X.

C. Valve is dumbing down linux for SteamOS, so it can be as user accessible as a dedicated game console. That doesn't mean that the OS won't be smart, expect it to handle drivers and other updates without troubling the user, just that the user will have more of the plug-n-play they expect from a game console.

D. It costs less per CPU to purchase 1000 CPUs at a time, wholesale, than it does to purchase just one CPU at retail. Same thing with motherboards, GPUs, RAM, HDDs, SSDs, etc. While you and I may pay $220 for an Intel i5-4xxx it does not cost the console manufacture as much

E. A manufacture can take a SteamBox and optimize and compile the SteamOS for their line of SteamBoxes, ensuring the highest performance possible, even while driving a 4K television and/or monitor.

F. It would be easy for the SteamOS to have it's own hardware profile, use that information to contact Valve once per week, and check to see if there is any new drivers available, and if so, patch itself.

G. The SteamBox is targeted squarely at the console market, and those that game on both PCs and consoles. It is trying to get the PC into the living room.

H. In 10 years or so you are likely to replace a SteamBox, yet in those ten years you are also able to upgrade it, keeping it fresh and current with the latest developments. Try that with a PS4 or XBoxOne.

I. You can plug more than one TV or monitor into the back of a SteamBox, and run them all at the same time. Can you do that with any of the consoles currently available?

J. You can have more than one type of human interface connected to the gaming system at the same time with the SteamOS, such as four people using joysticks and throttles, along with keyboards and keypads, mice/touch pads/track balls, and still attach other items with the system on.

K. You are not restricted to just one case, in one color, that you either love or have to live with. And you don't have to worry so much about voiding the warranty if the case is opened, or modded.

Sony is charging $399 for their PS4, which is better than Micro$oft's Xbox One, that is retailing for $499. CyberPowerPC and iBuyPower have introduced SteamBoxes that retail for $499 eacg, the same as the Xbox One, and that is not taking a loss on each and every sale. Also, as we have seen above, M$ is sub-par in a number of ways, the big three being always-connected (for now, just most of the time), the motion bar is always on (including the microphone), and not being able to share, trade, or sale your game without M$'s permission (they have back peddled on this too, yet for how long?). And lets not forget that the SteamBox machines are able to display 1080p on multiple tvs/monitors, at respectable frame rates, even power a 4k television (hello, Micro$oft, are you listening?). Sony is in better shape to be in second place, yet the XB1 is in a distant third.

While Micro$oft is loosing money on the initial sale, you can be sure that they are making their money somewhere, somehow. Consider trying to run an on-line game in multi-player mode, without a Xbox Live membership, which I think you can not do. So, that is a $60/yr (if pre-paid all at once) subscription fee, for the length of your gaming life (marriage and children do happen). And while some might say that Xbox Live is a good value, as it includes NetFlix, that is like saying my tablet includes NetFlix, it is just an app, you still need to subscribe to NetFlix separately. And don't forget that a game publisher has to buy, yes BUY, permission from Micro$oft to develop a game for the Xbox, and that purchase of permission is for one game only, and the game might never be release. And yes, while I have singled out Micro$oft, Sony charges for their PlayStation Plus membership, which grants you access to their PlayStation Network, and charges publishers a fee to have the privilege to develop a game for their console as well.

One finial thing, Steam is already more popular than Xbox Live - 65 million members verses 48 million members, respectively. To help you understand those numbers, Valve has 133% as many members as M$, or Micro$oft has only 75% of the user base as Valve.

So, as I see it, we have the following rankings:
Valve Steam on a SteamBox running SteamOS (best graphics, most customization, no subscription fees, etc)
Sony PlayStation 4 (better graphics than Xbox, along with better DRM, and other policies)
Microsoft Xbox One (deep pockets, and a desire not to admit they where wrong, will keep them producing Xboxes long after they should of given up)
Nintendo Wii U (not a real contender now, I will be surprised if they still exist after this year (2014))

Remember folks, we are readers of Maximum PC. I hope you do read the magazine. In just the past two years we have seen articles on The Best Bang for the Buck (comes in around $1200 to build, also the basic build featured in the blueprint section each month) from the Dec '12 issue, Cheapskate/Budget Builds (about $650) from the Oct '12 and June '13 issue, and a $650 AMD gaming rig in the Oct '13 issue. Valve, Steam, and the SteamBox, is mentioned numerous times over the past two years, even highlighting why someone would consider the SteamBox to a console.

One last reason you might want to pay more respect to a SteamBox than a console - Star Citizen on the Roberts Space Industries website, being developed by Cloud Imperium (testing all this year, to be released next year). It has been stated that SC will not be available on a console, as they refuse to dumb it down, or reduce the cpu and gpu requirements to run, you will need a high end PC to play it on. If OpenGL is implemented in the CryEngine then we can expect to see Star Citizen availble on Linux, and so it would be a great fit for Valve's Steam, and in turn the SteamBox. And with $35 MILLION in crowd funding raised within 14 months of it being announced (over $36 million as I write this)this game alone would be a dog gone good reason to purchase an OR and SteamBox (if it is released on Steam).

SteamBox running SteamOs, from Valve, will be a true game changer this year. Deal with it.

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The Mac

tl;dr

get to the point, the first 4 points of rambling, and i gave up.

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schroederrock

I agree - I got through a few, scrolled down to see where it was going, scrolled some more. I see some of the points but don't understand the need for an essay on the whole matter. For me - I don't understand why Steam Machines are being built at all. You've got PCs already - just use the Steam platform on Windows and you'll be fine. I understand that you would likely see some performance benefits from JUST a Steam OS instead of Windows running Steam, but in the end I would assume that the performance benefits would be minor. Looking at the list of machines I am quickly thinking "I'm out" on this one. The $499 starting price on the CyberPower and IBUYPOWER rigs was potentially interesting, but no specs are given @ that price point as it says "$499 and up". But a majority of these machines are well over $1,000 for starting price points. Do they not know that the masses are already hesitant to pick up next-gen game consoles @ $499 and are preferring to wait for prices to drop? I don't see where this has any chance of really getting off the ground. Cool concept, but to me this is just a concept with no real buyers market. My PC cost me around $700 in its current configuration (i5 3570k, Radeon 7870, 8GB DDR3 1600, 750w PSU, 240GB OCZ Agility 3 SSD, DVD-RW, mid/large ATX case, ASUS mobo). With my current rig I can run Battlefield 4 @ ultra settings and can hit 58-60 FPS but realistically average roughly 45-50 FPS @ 1080p when tons of people are around and things are going boom, and just about all my other PC games run at 60FPS (I use V-Sync on everything if possible). Guild Wars 2 with maxed settings on World vs World and around 200 people on-screen will cause me to drop from the steady 60 FPS to a modest 40-45 FPS, that's it. For $700, that's an excellent experience for me. If I wanted to make sure everything runs @ 60FPS I could have put another $70 down and gotten a 7970 or waited another year and picked up the new R9-280x with that extra cash.

All this to say that if I were locking myself into Steam-distributed games, which is a large but not complete library of games, then I would hope to be offered a good rig at a competitive price. But you're telling me I'm going to have to miss out on several mainstream titles because they're NOT distributed via Steam AND have to spend a LOT of money to get a great rig. Those running that Nvidia Titan GPU are super overkill unless you intend to run your games well beyond the 1080p resolution. If you can build a PC, then these Steam Machines are pointless. If you can't, maybe Razer's "Project Christine" will be a good deal and offer you cutting-edge gaming without dropping $2k+. Seriously, the Steam OS is redundant when you already can play these games on the computer you're using this very instant. It may not be the absolute best graphics available per game, but it will still be great. And your PC can do much, much, much more than a Steam-based rig will be able to do because you'll have Windows. I'm just not seeing this whole thing making any real headway. Is anyone out there honestly ready to drop a grand or more on one of these units?

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Vesuvius

Forget that I am looking at the Bolt 2 as my next gaming, work desktop for home as a Pc. I am just hoping it is not too overpriced. A 780ti, 500 gb ssd, I5, and 8 gb ram with 3 yr warranty under 2k. If it is priced at Falcon tiki or Origen levels of 2500 to 3k then back to a standard case like the new corsair 250d, or case labs mini itx 2-3 etc

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jbitzer

I love how so many people are pitching fits about "Steam Machines". Would all of you shut the hell up and go troll another thread if the title was : Look at all these SANS OS Computers?

I mean hell, they build a computer and throw STEAMOS on it. GO INSTALL WINDOWS ON IT IF YOU WANT TO.

instead we get "Waah Waah, I don't think Valve should try releasing an OS, there is no current support, they should fail and die in a fire"

Holy crap, there is currently no support for Playsation 5, should Sony shutter their doors?

The 2020 mustang doesn't have parts available yet, guess Ford should shut down.

You think people won't be falling over themselves to port games and provide support if STEAMOS takes off?

Remember how MS was going to fail because they never made a console before and EA Sports wouldn't support them? Yeah they really suffered for that.

I hope none of you own a business because you all have no vision.

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PCLinuxguy

Agreed

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firefox91

My favorite Steam Machine is the one already sitting on my desk. I get it, the Steam Machine is an effort to get console gamers over to Steam. It's a good idea, I just hope they market it to that crowd.

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legionera

3DOs all over the place again. Didn't they learn from the recent Android crap? Yeah, the one that apps are not optimized for all android devices and some are left out with half working devices (plus a battery drainage).

What they should have pushed is the stream gaming and back up Onlive. Thus, they would have pushed the ISPs to remove the caps and provide faster internet. We all win in that occasion.

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joeyjr

Looks like the Steam Box is gaining steam. The key to it all is PC's can do more and are better than a console, I just hope MS gets it and stops giving out the coolaid. That would Help PC gaming and squash the compitition in there tracks. Buy your games to support your developers would also make life alot easier, ( or do yo like DRM.) Who knows, one day they may even put a chip up my ass to monitor how much methane I produce so they can charge me for the polution like xbox live does. GAME ON DUUUUDE!!!

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basketcase87

The "Alternative" machine looks like it's in a Fractal Design Node 304.

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maleficarus™

I just read a pile of comments and it seems the one thing people are not understanding is, this "console" is in a class of its own. You can do one thing that you can not simple do for the Playstation or the XBOX or Nintendo. That is you can upgrade this console! You want a faster GPU? Fine, run out and buy a faster GPU! You want more memory? Ok not a problem. You want a bigger HDD? Again, not an issue...

The main reason we all started building gaming PC's is because we all wanted to buy the parts we wanted. You run out to Wal-Mart and drop $500 on a Xbone and for the next 6 years you have the exact same thing. The only thing difference you will get in those 6 years is slightly better looking games at the very end of the Xb1's life cycle. This will not be the case with the Steam machine. After a year or 2 you can simply run out and upgrade the GPU and call it a day! Why any of you don't like this is a HUGE condradition of why you went PC in the first place.

We should all be happy about the Steam Machine!

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John Pombrio

And who updates all those Linux drivers when a graphics card is swapped out? You? Valve? Ubuntu? Is the SteamOS robust enough to do it on its own or are you pushed into the Linux operating system to make changes? SteamOS is billing itself as a plug and play box. There is no way that the console based fans that the steam boxes are targeting will be ready to dive into Linux.

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chrisparodi1

As much as I would love to see these steam machines make some kind of impact, I 100% agree that your average "gamer" is not ready to deal with a machine that will require users to somewhat educate themselves on the device. Sometimes us computer guys have to force ourselves to understand that your average gamer has absolutely no idea nor do they care about the technology inside the box, they just want the instant gratification of popping in a disk and playing. To a PC gamer on the other hand, the build, the perfection, the tech, the sleepless nights trying to figure out what went wrong; it's that culture that separates PCs from consoles. I just don't think it will be possible (nor would I ever want) for the do-it-yourself mentality to be taken out of PC gaming.

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The Mac

the onle thing you are missing is its 1/2 the performance of a similarily priced console.

You would have to upgrade the crap out of the base machine to a $2000 machine (and they have, the bolt) in order to match the graphics performance of a console.

so now it costs 4x as much to match the performace of said console.

how does that make sense?

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KrisPC

With a 2000$ machine you can play games at 5760x1080 with high detail (and get 60 fps).

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The Mac

i think you missed my point.

Of course the $2000 machine is better than a console.

its also 4x more expensive.

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SuperSATA

@The Mac although I completely agree with you in principle, those figures are way way off. It would cost about maybe $1-200 more to build a PC comparable to the consoles. And I'd say as is, a $500 Steam machine would be about 2/3 of the power, not 1/2. Maybe 3/5. Or 4/7. Or 5/9. Or any fraction that follows the same pattern.

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The Mac

diminishing returns as you get higher.

I would agree with you on last gen consoles, but the new gen, its gonna take way more than that to match it.

Perhpas $2000 is a bit hyperbolic, but not a chance even a $1000 machine would come close to the same visual quality as the current gen consoles.

Im hoping mantle will take a chunk out of that.

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SuperSATA

Are you quite sure even still about that? I know that the console makers are taking about a $50 loss for each console, but that means that they would have cost $6-700 to manufacture. Are you telling me that equivalently performing OEM PC components would cost you $400 more than current gen consoles? From what I heard, the Xbox One has the same level of performance as a GTX 760 or 770, and a PC build with those parts would never cost you over 1k. Maybe if you were to shell out for other high end components like an 8 core processor that would be correct, but I'm talking pure graphical performance.

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Circlestrafe

The Mac has no clue what he's talking about. Nowhere near 2 grand to build a PC that matches the new consoles. Not even double. If you want to obliterate the new consoles, then yes, those figures are viable. If you want to talk equivalent, knock it down to 750 or less.

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The Mac

you clearly didnt read the rest of the thread.

I used $2000 only because thats the price of the bolt, i was being hyperbolic.

$1500 is more realistic price.

There is not a chance in hell a $750 machine will match the fidelity of a console.

none.

We are not talking about raw performance here, we are talking about equivilent Graphics and FPS fidelity.

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The Mac

As pure hardware, yes you are correct.

However due to OS API abstraction overhead (consoles are way more efficient with the same hardware - Bare metal programming), and economies of scale in manufacturing (they can get the parts way cheaper than you can) and you are talking about at least 2x as much money for the same level of performance.

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The Mac

double post.

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Chewieshmoo

More and more I fail to see who this is marketed for? I can play STEAM in BIG SCREEN MODE on my current PC. Soooo what is the advantage, at these price points if someone wants to get into STEAM gaming they should just build a PC then they can do that and TONS more! I thought maybe it was for people who want STEAM gaming but don't want to build a PC but then one can BUY Pre-configured PC's already? I really want to hear the excuses people come up with for dropping $$$$$ on these things? Even the few models I liked and thought were OK priced I still just see them as PC's. If you are going to be dealing with so many various specs and paying that kind of money you are stupid when you can just upgrade or by a PC. I will be keen to see how these do really.

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Scatter

If you're already playing games via Steam on your large screen then great. Valve is happy. You're already a Steam customer. This device is more designed for those who aren't tech savy enough to built their own gaming PCs and want to play in their living rooms. It's just another option to attract more people to Steam. And personally I think that it will attract a fair amount of people who may have only been console gamers until now.

This is really a Win/Win for everyone involved. There's not a huge investment made by Steam. They don't make the hardware, Linux is open source. and for the hardware manufacturers, I'm sure that they're drooling over the thought of a new audience to sell their parts to.

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John Pombrio

Scatter, the main issue I see with this is that a Steam Machine will have to be as robust at plug and play as consoles. Consoles are locked into the hardware while the drivers and programming is already loaded in. For a steam machine, the SteamOS will have to be set up and configured for the particular box with its countless possibilities of configurations before being shipped out. Who exactly does that configuring, getting the right drivers, setting up the graphics cards, and making sure the controller works on the games? Frankly, Valve does not have the resources that MS does or the installed base the Linux does so either they use the Linux drivers (which are constantly being updated for bug patches) or write them in house (a big job). The hardware manufacturers certainly will not want this onerous job.
To see the problem, look at the release date of SteamOS. There isn't one! Lots of alpha releases but a finished product, who knows?

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maleficarus™

Not sure if you have used the Steam app before but everything auto updates through Steam. Why is it a stretch to assume Steam just won't auto upload all updated drivers for GPU? I really can't see this being an issue...

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The Mac

becaue linux doesnt work that way.

in order update all the config files, we are talking about a mess of changes, and permissioning issues.

Linux is secure for a reason. You have to sudo the crap out of everything.

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SuperSATA

I'm glad you said that.

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John Pombrio

I am on the side of "bah, humbug" on Steam Machines too. The COMPUTERS look fine, it is the SteamOS that get me riled. Take a perfectly good copy of Linux and REMOVE most of the features. Now Valve has to develop new drivers for all the hundreds of graphics cards out there, write drivers and map out the proprietary controller, write new software including a browser JUST to run a Steam computer of all shapes, sizes, and configurations.
So is SteamOS proprietary or not? If not, then why not just run Ubuntu and ADD the "special sauce" that makes up SteamOS? If proprietary, then Valve is taking on a MASSIVE project to independently write all the drivers themselves or STEAL the drivers from Linux.
Is SteamOS faster to run a game, simpler to install, and use with ALL of the drivers and software included? Now THIS might be its ONLY saving grace. However, SteamOS would constantly require new builds to include ALL of the new hardware that is being released. Expect 2-3 "builds" a year and constant updates for the controller mapping schemes as games are added. "Simple" is not a word that I would use for constantly shifting hardware and software that needs to be addressed.
Consoles are FIXED in hardware configurations and requires very few updates a year. SteamOS will certainly be not even close to this transparent operation.
Finally, there is the throwaway of "dual boot". If it turns out that Windows runs the games less than 10% slower than SteamOS, can use the new controller, and Steam is already used by so many and plays ALL of the games, where does that leave SteamOS? Nowhere in a good place is where.

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The Mac

The reality is, it needs to be locked down in order to adhere to publisher DRM demands.

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Scatter

The Steam app does but would the OS need to be?

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The Mac

to some extent, they would need to control the OS to inhbit hacking tools.

Also there is the issue of standardization.

Because linux is so open, theere are a bazzilion configurations out there.

If everyone didnt start from the same base configuration, it would be a support nightmare trying to get everything working correctly.

also, most console users (i say most, not all) are noobs when it comes to advance oses like linux. We cant have the kiddies flailing about uselessly when presented whith an unintended console screen and a flashing cursor.

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Scatter

Why would a Steam Box need to be locked down any more so than a normal PC running the Steam client?

And as for updates, how difficult would it really be for the Steam client to have an auto updating tool build in for video and sound drivers? Basically they'd just be bundling something like the Geforce Experience into the SteamOS

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John Pombrio

Mac, you got it! Consoles are locked up tight, both hardware and software. They present the users with a unified experience and are truly plug and play. Look at all the grief MS and SONY got for requiring ONE update at launch.
Now these consolers have a Unix box attached to their TV. Valve can try to simplify the experience as much as possible, but it will never be plug and play. Linux is always having to update graphics drivers as there are invariably bugs when new games come out. Is Valve responsible to push these updates out or does the poor consoler have to navigate Linux to upgrade? Then something breaks and the user is dumped out to the Linux shell. They have never SEEN Linux let alone know what to do to fix a trivial problem (like a down wireless network). They call the manufacturer for help and are told its a Valve problem. Valve sends them a Linux operating manual. I can see lots of returns in their future!

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The Mac

Fixing a busted wireless network in linux isnt exactly what id call trivial.

lol

perhaps its easier in Ubantu, but it was a giant pain in the ass in gentoo.

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Ninjawithagun

No one has yet to make any kind of logical agrument as to why would one want a Steam machine just to run SteamOS? For one, SteamOS is only capable of running a handful of games. All games are in OpenGL coding and do not support any enhanced graphics features such as DirectX, hardware tessellation, or PhysX. A vast majority of the newest games and almost all future games will have most if not all of these enhanced coding built into them. One would make the argument that you can make a dual-boot system out of a Steam machine. Really? Why the hell would I want to do that? It's a complete waste of money!! If I wanted to play Steam games on my TV, I would just build my own m-ATX PC and run Steam through Windows 8.1 Pro. I've been playing games through Steam on Windows for over 7 years and have had zero issues. Now Valve wants to push this crap onto the masses just so they can make a few extra bucks? Their marketing is horrible at best and has not provided one solid reason why anyone should waste their money on this pure BS marketing crap. To you suckers that are buying into this, don't be fooled. You will have buyer's remorse, trust me. I can already 'see' the waves of used Steam machines for sale on Craigslist...NUFF SAID!

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JlzMT

"For one, SteamOS is only capable of running a handful of games."
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A similar argument could be made for any video game console when it launches. My answer is, 'So What?'

This is in no way a bad thing.

More games will be made, and it will encourage the big developers to make games that will work out of the box on Linux distros.

"If I wanted to play Steam games on my TV, I would just build my own m-ATX PC and run Steam through Windows 8.1 Pro."
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Not everyone is competent enough to operate a PC, let alone build one. Some people (like Mac owners) just want to turn it on and use it.

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Random

Any step away from Microsoft products is a step in the right direction. If you hate the idea of a steam machine then don't buy it. 'NUFF SAID.

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stradric

I support what Valve is doing and find it sad that you are so short-sighted in your preemptive dismissal of the noble goal of creating an open gaming platform free of license fees and closed APIs.

SteamOS is a long term project. The fact that you are dismissing it even before it gets a chance to catch its stride is contemptible. Your bloviating rant says more about your own ignorance and lack of character than anything.

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Obsidian

That was really well written. I would have replied to the initial drivel but you, PCLinuxguy and others have already nailed why the initial message is so flawed.

The importance of Steam OS, Steam Machine etc isn't just this initial round of hardware; it has a lot more to do with the long term outlook for gaming, OS diversity and increased competition. That weight of importance is almost unfair to Valve, but this kind of movement has a lot of cascading implications for computing.

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stradric

Thanks. The anger that these Steamboxes generate is perplexing. At the core, all Valve is doing is inviting more people to use Steam in the way that they like best. Don't want to use SteamOS? Fine. Don't want to game on the couch? Fine. Don't want to use a Steam Controller or Occulus Rift? Fine. The status quo is alive and well, and thriving.

I personally would love to see SteamOS succeed. With the Steam Controller and Occulus Rift on the horizon, the PC gaming sphere seems to be the one to watch over the relatively boring console gaming world. So, unless one simply hates progress, I don't understand why anyone would not support Valve's initiative.

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PCLinuxguy

Some people just have nothing better to do than to bash things that they don't like or can't understand.

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Sir Hobbes3

You obviously don't see the long term picture here. The basic idea here is to start breaking away from Microsoft as the go to OS maker for PC gaming as Windows 8 is s*** and it has been rumored that Windows will soon be cloud based like Office 365. Also OpenGL actually has many advantages over DirectX (which is an API btw tard). PhysX is an nVidia only feature that isn't used in too many games (the only big recent game i can recall using PhysX is Borderlands 2). This also is more marketed towards people who have a console or are considering buying one that would potentially buy a PC but don't have the time or knowledge to build their own. And your hate towards this is really uncalled for as it's not really saying "BUY ONE NOW OR ELSE!" Go troll somewhere else.

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John Pombrio

So run OpenGL on Windows.

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PCLinuxguy

So, just because it doesn't appeal to you it's automatically a pile of shit that no one else would even want? Nice to know that the universe revolves around you. Also, nice to see you're being a troll by posting all over the comments to this article with your "my opinion is the only opinion and that opinion is that this product is shit and anyone that disagrees is a fucking moron" attitude. We get it, you don't like the concept as it does not suit any of your needs. However you're not the only person in the world, therefore bashing it in such a narrow minded fashion is asinine.

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tetris42

I'm kind of amazed at your hate towards this, no one's telling you to buy one!

This is a long-haul strategy. Of course Linux isn't as good as Windows gaming right now. So we should just accept whatever Microsoft hands us, even though it's been rumored (here on this site) that Windows 10 will be cloud based? Unless you TOTALLY trust Microsoft to NEVER do anything to screw up PC gaming, I don't see how this is a negative thing. I personally see MS and consoles as having been the biggest potential danger to PC gaming more than anyone, and this is a long term exit strategy from both of those. If PC gaming ever seriously makes its way to Linux, the genie is out of the bottle and no one company will ever have the level of control over gaming as some companies do now (even Valve!)

This is the start of what is hopefully a long encroachment upon consoles and Microsoft against having things locked down. It's not going to overthrow anything in the short term.

Here's who this product is marketed at: Someone who's considering buying a console, doesn't know a lot about PC gaming, but maybe has heard how cheap Steam games can, so bam, here's a machine for the price of an xbox one that can do more things.

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AFDozerman

You're shitting me, right? " All games are in OpenGL coding and do not support any enhanced graphics features such as DirectX, hardware tessellation, or PhysX".

DirectX is an API, not a feature, and OpenGL's hardware tesselation is better implemented than DirectX's. PhysX is based on CUDA, which means that it's just a port away. Actually, come to think of it, I think it's been ported already. OpenGL has nothing to do with it, but in the end, nobody wants PhysX anymore, so don't talk like it's something people are actively turning down games for not having.

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Sir Hobbes3

@AFDozerman
+1

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donttasemebro

I just see the whole "Steam Machine" as pc companies trying to be more like consoles just like consoles trying to be more like pc... with components overlapping and in the end I just don't see this surviving.