Seagate Goes Big, Ships Industry's First 8TB Hard Drive

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vonhulio

My first hard drive was 10MB. I used a DOS program called "doublespace" to take it to a whopping 20MB. My mind was blown. It then took twice as long to read/write to/from the drive. That was the tradeoff apparently. It was still faster than playing Kings Quest from the floppy disks though.... And all of this was only 25 years ago. crazy

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Rebel_X

1995 - Sci-Fy movie Johnny Mnemonic's brain capacity :p
"80 gigabytes
Johnny Mnemonic doubles his capacity from 80 gigabytes to a whopping 160 gigabytes! Stream. slipknot2k4. I would install 4TB in my brain with Tropico 4 installed and apply to become president and fix the economy right away not years."

LOL. I remember at that time I was installing Windows 95 using floppy disks, and the setup asking me to insert floppy #3. XD

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aarcane

I'd like to get a half dozen of these into my ZFS box!

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Volleynova

The problem is as soon as one gets close to filling up that 8TB hard drive, the drive will probably die, as do most Seagates (good old Maxtor technology) after a bit of use.

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John Pombrio

Knock on wood but so far my 6 3TB Seagate drives are doing fine. I was a Hitachi fanatic for years so I still back up my Seagates religiously.

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Hey.That_Dude

Failure rates generally go up with capacity. Most people in the market for this drive right now will be able to fill it quickly and protect the data with some form of raid.
But yeah, I'd love for the failure rates to be lower, for everyone.

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LatiosXT

That sounds dubious. Need a citation.

I guess the only thing I can think of where this would make sense is that higher capacity means smaller magnetic domains that can fade away faster over time... but still, I'd rather see some study on that.

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John Pombrio

Much simpler. The more disks you squeeze into a given form factor, the more heat is generated spinning them. Heat kills.

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Hey.That_Dude

Wonder if these are going to be He drives or if the density's just higher so that there's fewer platters and less heat.

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jtrpop

What Seagate really needs is a drastic improvement in their reliability and to increase their warranties. Seagate drives have been so unreliable in the last few years I cannot recommend them.

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John Pombrio

I just buy a bunch of them cheaply and expect one or two to fail. Dammit tho, the Seagates are ALL working just fine so now I have 3TB disk drives just sitting in drawers.

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SliceAndDice

16 PB drives, 32-core CPUs, 16K Hi def video, 8 TB of Ram, Trillions of transistors per chip... This is the future. When we get there, we'll need the space and the speed these specs offer. Back in the late 90's Weird Al had a song called "All about the Pentiums." This was when the 3 GB hard drives were the standard. One of his statements was "I got me 100 GB of Ram." We all laughed. It's is 2 years from being standard.

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usmckozmo

"I can't even fathom a 300 TB drive...That is more space than any single person would ever need!" -Typo91 (2014)

"640K (of RAM) ought to be enough for anyone." - Bill Gates (1981)

8TB right now is almost fully filled by 320 uncompressed Blu-Ray rips. When 4K comes mainstream that will shrink drastically. That's just video. Don't underestimate the ability of our data-intensive world to quickly fill up any available storage: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130522085217.htm

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Volleynova

Bill Gates never said that, thank goodness. Anyone in the computer industry knows that -insert number here- will never be enough for anyone.

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LatiosXT

>uncompressed Blu-Ray rips
This makes me chuckle, because Blu-Ray movies are compressed. Uncompressing a Blu-Ray movie to me implies it's been stored as a raw video format.

In which case I think 8TB would be enough to store three videos.

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praetor_alpha

"640K (of RAM) ought to be enough for anyone." - not Bill Gates

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2534312/operating-systems/the--640k--quote-won-t-go-away----but-did-gates-really-say-it-.html

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Peanut Fox

I was just going to bring this up :P

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usmckozmo

"I can't even fathom a 300 TB drive...That is more space than any single person would ever need!" -Typo91 (2014)

"640K (of RAM) ought to be enough for anyone." - Bill Gates (1981)

8TB right now is almost fully filled by 320 uncompressed Blu-Ray rips. When 4K comes mainstream that will shrink drastically. That's just video. Don't underestimate the ability of our data-intensive world to quickly fill up any available storage: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130522085217.htm

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Typo91

It reminds me of when GB drives first came out... first there was the 1GB, then 2... then 4. (4gb quantum bigfoot anyone?)

Then came the 13gb... and before you knew it was the 32, the 64, and then poof 300.

I can't even fathom a 300 TB drive...

That is more space than any single person would ever need!

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wkwilley2

"That is more space than any single person would ever need!"

Someone has made that assumption before with a much lower capacity...let us not repeat history.

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DirtModeler

My first PC was a compaq XT 'suitcase computer' with a tiny green monochrome screen and a whopping 10mb hard drive..

The stuff we have today is beyond even what me and my friends would joke about what would be ridiculous.... Gigabytes of RAM? Terabytes of Storage?

It wasn't even fathomable when the computers we were using had 384k of ram, and 10mb of storage!

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Renegade Knight

Great computer in it's day. I preferred to do my homework on them in College before I could afford my own PC.

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John Pombrio

I worked on 7906B HP hard drives back in 1981. It was the size of a dishwasher, weighed more, cost $13K BACK THEN, and had 10MB removable platters- each about 15 inches in diameter. There was a 10MB fixed platter mounted under the removable platter. If I go to hell, I will be forced to rebuild that damn hard drive after a lower platter head crash. For eternity.

http://www.hpmuseum.net/upload_htmlFile/PrintAds/Ad1979_Feb_1000-F-Series_7906_MMS-31.jpg

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don2041

I still have my suitcase computer and it still works as it did when new. SLOW

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m35g35

I am just a few days older... My first computer was a North Star Horizon with dual floppies that had 360k each. Seagate had the ST506 standard for 5 and 10MB hard drives. And they where expensive, around a few thousand. The North Star was 8-bit CPU Z80A 4 Megahertz and addressed 64K RAM that was static.

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praetor_alpha

The unfortunate thing is that we aren't even using what we have to its fullest potential.

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dgrmouse

praetor_alpha said, "The unfortunate thing is that we aren't even using what we have to its fullest potential."

Or maybe the fortunate thing is that we don't have to scrutinize every program one instruction at a time, optimizing for every last ounce of efficiency in order to get a good experience. There's something to be said of a computer so fast that it can well with badly written code.

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DirtModeler

I personally feel like they bloat the software on purpose.. i look at my productivity and compare it to what it was on my 486 DX2/66

It really isn't much different today then it was back then.. Though my computer is many times more power then it was back then.

They could make the current code much more efficient, and computers could REALLY sing.. but they don't.. they just add bloat so you net the same amount of speed.

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John Pombrio

Except for games and video encoding, the computer spends exactly 99.97% of its time waiting for you to push a key or move the mouse. If there is a true speed sucker upper, it is sitting in the chair in front of your screen.