Russia Offering $111,000 for Tor De-anonymization Know-how

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Bullwinkle J Moose

I wonder if the Russians will figure out how easy it is to virtualize all the nodes (entry and exit points) on a single server using virtual GUID's and randomized hardware profiles

It's not hard to see where the queries are coming from and where they are going when you control all the nodes from a single server or what data is being encrypted

DOH

Faking GUID's and hardware profiles is easy enough in a Virtual World but since all the hardware sold has unique ID's and serial numbers, fake ID's for entry points should be made from real hardware that has been decommissioned or destroyed

The actual server that contains the virtual machines has a real IP address, but simply routes the TOR data to virtual addresses on the server

Since the entry point and final exit point are in the clear (unencrypted), and all the nodes are in virtual machines on a single "real" server at virtual Internet addresses, the problem is no longer a problem is it?

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John Pombrio

add this to Russia's announcement of fingerprinting and photographing every single foreign visitor to their country "for their protection" and the limiting of internet access to Russian college students "for their protection from sites like porn". Slowly shrinking the Russian view of the world day by day.

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MrHasselblad

Every single adult entering or leaving the united states is also photographed. The fingerprint, america can do better than that.

It's called the RFID device in ones passport, very soon to be added into each and every state drivers license.

Also when entering leaving the country... Ones smartphone (several) unique identifiers are also logged in - even if the phone is not on. The same with most any mobile computing device made sine 1999, also even if not on.

Not to worry though.

That's the same united states government that could not protect it's citizens on 9/11, or in Boston, or in many other instances. But it's for your protection though. Slowly shrinking each and every single one of the freedoms that americans now have, day by day.

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vrmlbasic

Yep. The Russians even did us a solid with the Boston incident, giving us a heads up on those nuts, and we still couldn't stop it :(

Before people trade their, and my, liberty for security they ought to demand proof that they'll actually get security in response for liberty as it has been a one sided exchange :(

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MaximumMike

>>Before people trade their, and my, liberty for security they ought to demand proof that they'll actually get security in response for liberty as it has been a one sided exchange

It has ALWAYS been a one sided exchange. The men who founded this country fought for freedom and they understood it better than we do today. They warned us about this very thing. But there are a plenty here and throughout most of the rest of the country who have no problem disregarding the lessons of history because they are too cowardly to live free.

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LatiosXT

I'm going to argue on 9/11. The thing is, while airplane hijacking was nothing new, nobody was expecting them to use the planes as missiles as most hijacking attempts ended with the plane landing safely somewhere.

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vrmlbasic

Except for that first episode of the X-Files spinoff The Lone Gunmen. :)

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shotgun-eddie

I guess microwaving your driver’s license will become common place then.

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EKRboi

"I guess microwaving your driver’s license will become common place then."

I'm going out on a limb here and saying that it will be illegal to do so. I'm pretty sure that your license is conisdered government property. If I am wrong, it will only be a matter of time before it is made illegal. At the very least the ID will be considered invalid if the chip is not working.

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AFDozerman

Does the US military still use TOR? If so, this could be a bigger issue than just Russian pedos needing a new network.