Partial Steam Machine Tear Down Video Shows Off Excellent Cable Management

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LatiosXT

A little on the "old news" side of things, but iFixit did a tear down. None of the components except for the chassis are proprietary. ( http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Steam+Machine+Teardown/20473 ) In particular the PSU is a SFX Silverstone unit (SFX is a standard size) and the PCI Express riser is also from Silverstone.

So yeah, the open nay sayers can go eat it.

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BeVar

@Paul_Lilly> The price has been thrown around on a few sites. I've seen $1200.00; that's with the GTX 780 or 780 Ti (about $700), which eats up most of the cost.

The build looked very neat to me, well done. The plastic shrouding is reminiscent of some ASUS mainboards. Nice touch.

In my build, I plan to use a Samsung EVO drive and apparently it has to be at least 1 Terabyte from the install instructions. Expensive, from $569.99 on Newegg.

As you can see with the cost of the video and SSD alone my price is already at $1270.00 before tax.

I saw last month iBuyPower is doing a machine for around $500.

Ya know there are allot of people out there that don't care about super duper graphics and blazing speed.
I see it everyday in my business. They just want the cheapest thing out there.

The general public just wants it to look good, even though they always say they don't care what it looks like.

For the general public the Steam Machine would have to be $300.00 and you know from what I see the cost's are for Laptops in WalMart I bet they could do it. Also, Manufacturer's will save money on Licensing any software.

This is going to be a big thing I bet.

Microsoft will wish they never put Windows 8 out and pissed Gabe Newell off.

LOL

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LatiosXT

I seriously doubt that Valve will abandon Windows outright. There's plenty of reason to develop for Windows (considering the Xbox One runs a stripped down version of it... it's easy to "port" games over) and there's plenty of reason to use Steam as the launch platform (given its near-universal love).

Plus I use my computer for things other things *gasp!* than gaming. Having a specialized OS will mean it'll just be on the back burner if I ever decide to dual boot.

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PCLinuxguy

That's the main thing I see from the naysayers and trolls is the whole "ZOMG, Valve iz going to abandon Windoze from now on with their shitty alternate OS that is a DOS knock-off. I'm going to go console 4evr now" bullcrap. You'll never be able to convince them of the truth because they are deaf to anything other than their ramblings.

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michaeladcock

"And speaking of cables, check out that cluster next to the power supply -- props to Valve on a job well done."

Most, if not all of the Steam Machines being shipped currently were built by Origin PC, and they've always been known for their clean wiring. Sure, it doesn't take away from the fact that it is extremely clean, but Origin needs to get their share of the credit. ;)

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maleficarus™

What I love about the steam machine is they are making the console more PC upgrade friendly. You can't take apart a PS4 and plop in a GTX series card. But, by the looks of this machine you can. I really hope the Steam Machine is a big success for Valve. It is truly bridging the gap between PC and console. Another thing I don't think most have realized is by buying this Steam Machine, you more or less bought 100% support for every single game in your steam library.

If I was not a PC gamer this would be the machine I would invest into. You would never see my living room with a PlayStation of Xbox. But one day there might be a Steam Machine!

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satrain18

It has to run Windows games from a Windows machine.

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satrain18

Why are we're still saying Steam Box? It's Steam Machine!

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John Pombrio

A riser board to fit the graphics card. A custom power supply. Goodie, we are back to the bad old days of proprietary computer builds with little room to expand and few things that we would be able to repair/replace/upgrade. I bet the CPU is a BGA on the mobo too.

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Obsidian

This one particular Steam Box sacrifices flexibility for space-saving. No secret anyone can build one of these things. A Steam Box can be put into a 7-cubic-foot monster enclosure if one really needs that much area to work with.

The CPU doesn't need to be some server-class unit. It's running Linux and Steam Games at 1080p, not exactly in need of the very high end parts.

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PCLinuxguy

The guy is an obvious troll. Just try to ignore him.

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LatiosXT

You do realize SteamBoxes aren't trying to cater to the DIY market? They're catering to the console gamer who wants to join the "PC gaming master race" via SteamOS without building a computer or installing the OS (which at the moment is a bit WTF, at least on a VM).

Also PCI Express risers aren't hard to find: http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/300949243071?lpid=82

EDIT: If you're upset about this, build your own Steam Box. It's open for a reason.

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Innomasta

The CPU is likely a decent one, and i'm sure you know a good CPU ages like fine wine. They made upgradeable the things that matter most. Sure it's got some proprietary in it, but when you cram that much hardware into such a small space, you gotta go do a little fabrication.

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LatiosXT

Every time I see one of these SFF cases, I think to myself... how come no DIY mini-ITX case manufacturers give builders a PCIe riser so they can orient the video card as shown here? It doesn't have to be a card either (I've seen ribbon cable versions).

Also a note about the laptop drive comment down there, I'm willing to bet that laptop drives are actually more efficient in this manner: since the platter sizes are smaller, the head needs to travel less to get to its destination. Plus since hard drives use CAV, it's wasting less time on the outer edges. Hence why all the last 10K RPM drives went to 2.5" formafactor platters.

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Innomasta

i'm not an engineer, but the benchmarks don't lie. Desktop HDD's are much faster at the same RPM's.

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LatiosXT

Because desktop HDDs have more heads. The other two factors in HDD speeds are response time and density. Laptop drives have those two, but have less heads (I think the most you can fit is 2, versus 5 on a HDD).

There was a experiment done somewhere back when 2.5" platter 10K drives were around to prevent a 3.5" 1TB drive from accessing data on the outer third or half of the drive and it came pretty damn close to matching the 2.5" 10K drive's performance

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Obsidian

I like it. Not much to it really. It's clearly meant for that exact graphics card due to the plastic shroud under it. Can't really get much more compact with standard PC parts. With everything so close I wonder if the power supply cables were custom lengths. No real need for them to be all that flexible since configuration changes aren't likely.

It looked like to add another hard drive the top tension housing around the existing hard drive may have to be removed? There's a ramp thing there that is odd, and by the look of the connectors a second hard drive would have to sit on top of the existing one, making for some interesting bending of that part. Maybe there was space underneath that can't be seen in the video.

That's a lot of hardware crammed into a small space. Excellent.

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Innomasta

i like. I was rather surprised to see the laptop HDD in there... but let's face it once the game's done loading it's mostly RAM anyway so who cares!

Any word on pricing, Paul?

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stradric

It depends on the game. XCOM, for example, performs poorly on a drive with high access times. There is a very noticeable delay when ending turns.

The good thing is that if we have these SteamOS reference units, developers will be able to ensure their game plays on such a system in order to provide a more consistent experience all around.

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Paul_Lilly

I haven't heard anything on Valve's pricing, no.