Overclocking Site Solves Mystery Behind Higher Ivy Bridge Temperatures

Paul Lilly

Intel stepped up to the plate and seemingly hit a homerun with its Ivy Bridge architecture (which, by the way, is now showing up in retail). It's the first commercial processor to boast a 22nm manufacturing process and 3D transistors, a combination that ultimately leads to better performance with less power consumption than previous generation processors. At the same time, some have reported higher temps with Ivy Bridge compared to Sandy Bridge, and it could have to do with the way Intel attached the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS).

Overclockers.com set out to solve the mystery of why Ivy Bridge can run as much as 20C higher than Sandy Bridge. The two prevailing theories are that power density is greater on Ivy Bridge than Sandy Bridge, and that Intel is running into issues with the manufacturing process. But the real reason, according to Overclockers , has to do with Intel's decision to use TIM paste between the IHS and CPU die on Ivy Bridge instead of fluxless solder as found on Sandy Bridge.

"If you’ve been paying attention, we saw similar issues between the E6XXX and E4XXX processor lines," Overclockers explains. "The E6XXX used a solder attach under the IHS and were far easier to keep cool. The E4XXX used a TIM paste under the IHS and ran hot!"

Overclockers pried apart an Ivy Bridge processor to verify the existence of thermal paste, and according to the U.K.'s The Inquirer , Intel has already "admitted" that Ivy Bridge runs hotter than Sandy Bridge. Intel, however, isn't concerned.

"This is as designed and meets quality and reliability expectations for parts operating under specified conditions," Intel explained about the increased thermal density, according to The Inquirer .

Are you concerned that Ivy Bridge may run a little hotter than Sandy Bridge, or do you trust Intel's decision to use thermal paste?

Image Credit: Overclockers.com

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