Over Half of Android Devices Have Jelly Bean Installed

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vrmlbasic

My device was just barely given Jelly Bean, an early version, and it is scarcely 2 years old. Tragically I'm already seeing apps that have just recently cut support for it, their logic being that my phone has physical buttons and Google is pushing for software-only, displayed-on-the-screen buttons.

In some cases I wish that I could go back to the older versions as Google really screws some things up when they upgrade. No sleep mode, no "charge only" connect option for USB...

My stock Google apps blow (since Google bought my phone maker). It takes over a minute for a full panorama shot to be saved by my camera app and the camera app will not take another picture until that operation is complete. I would have thought that by now they'd have realized what _multi-core_ processors can do.

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MaximumMike

>> my phone has physical buttons and Google is pushing for software-only, displayed-on-the-screen buttons.

Could you elaborate on that one? I wasn't aware that having physical buttons prevented soft buttons from working. Could you cite the specific app or functionality you had this problem with? Also, what device did this happen with, and on what version of Android? Sorry for being so nosy, but this issue has piqued my interest and I'd like to read up on it.

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pastorbob

Fragmentation is a non-issue.

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Gikero

I've noticed a lot of prepaid Android smartphones that still have 2.3 or 4.0 on them. The way I see it, most of those devices are so underpowered that fragmentation isn't that much of a issue. I've personally only run into the issue once, but I don't download apps too often.

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MaximumMike

What's the big deal? Windows fragmentation is probably worse than this. I'd like to see the numbers on Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, WIndows XP, and the various versions of Windows Server that are in the wild.

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vrmlbasic

I think that Windows fragmentation is better than this as this chart does not take into account the different versions of each Google OS. For instance, I'm at an earlier version of Jelly Bean and it is markedly different from the latest version.

I'm thinking that most of the people running XP are up-to-date with hotfixes and service packs, that there's very little "same version stratification" going on in Windows. There's a fair bit of it in Android.

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MaximumMike

>>I'm thinking that most of the people running XP are up-to-date with hotfixes and service packs, that there's very little "same version stratification" going on in Windows.

Well, that's what you're assuming. But from years of experience doing computer repair, I know that to be false. Most people don't install patches and security updates unless they were turned on by default (as evidenced by all the malware and bot nets in the wild). Also, in the business world most IT departments turn off the updates and only install the ones they want, creating yet another type of fragmentation.

Additionally, Windows XP service packs 1, 2, and 3 are markedly different; Windows Vistas SP1 is markedly different; and the latest version of Windows 8 is markedly different.

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PCLinuxguy

Agreed, however that won't happen. As much as I can see the Pros and Cons to each OS, fragmentation does affects all of them to some degree. The only time it's ever mentioned though, is when used to bash anything that isn't a Microsoft or Apple product (i.e. Android and Linux devices).