NSA Uses Radio Waves to Spy on Offline PCs

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Fional

Micro Keylogger is an invisible keylogger for Windows computer. Running secretly in the background, it keeps record of keystrokes typed, passwords entered, websites history and so on. With Micro Keylogger, you will know everything that is happening to the computer. http://www.remotespy.co/pc-keylogger.html

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legionera

Now that we all know that NSA has pics of us naked can't we just undress and fuck each other like normal animals?

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LatiosXT

Easy solution to this problem if you're paranoid - Wrap foil around your cables.

Your case should act as a decent Faraday cage assuming it's made of metal and doesn't have a window.

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philipa25

Even if I put a tin foil hat on my computer?

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Auguste Dupin

NSA is behind all this FUD... Don't try and encrypt we can break it; don't disconnect, we will connect anyway... In fact, it's what they fear the most. It's like the uber Quantum Computer they are building, supposedly. They're proclaiming it will be able to brute force every possibility all at once... Guess what, developers and cryptographers will come with a new way to get around that, and this, is also what they fear the most. FUD again.

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jwcard

This is fairly old news and is related to TEMPEST and EMI.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_%28codename%29

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MantaBase

Anyone who has or had physical access to your system can plant what is essentially a "bug" - and USB is a great option. However, like Teknishun, I am skeptical this (technique) is wide spread because it would be replete with problems (simple interference alone for one) unless it was very short range and thus specifically targeted. SO, simple solution, build your own system - and open it up regularly to clean it. Unless the NSA is in bed with MB companies, this technique would require the addition of hardware that for radio output should be obvious in your case. On the other hand, tapping your AC line and adding a little piece of hardware to the interior of your PSU can also work. Still targeted but much harder to see.

For those of us that are paranoid, we use Faraday cages and power conditioners with white noise generators and a faux system with true data storage being done to a NAS drive hidden in the wall behind what looks like a normal CAT receptacle. No way NSA is getting my cookie recipes.

Wait, did I say that out loud?

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Joji

So Snowden currently lives in Russia, right? I wonder what other information he has with him. For example, does he have anything that would compromise US security, military and etc?

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John Pombrio

The dud took hundreds of thousands of documents, which currently reside at the NY Times, The Guardian Register, Wikileaks, and perhaps Der Speigal. They are going to be releasing NSA dirt for a long, long time.

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hornfire3

Where's Bullwinkle? I wanna hear his response.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

but the NSA also utilizes a secret technology that allows the organization to "alter data" in computers even when they're not connected to the internet.

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If you can alter data on an offline computer, then you can alter data on an online computer

When they compromise an online computer this way to see the browsing habits, it is sometimes referred to as Gaydar....

and that's not a codename, so.....

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Teknishun

I'm a bit skeptical. As a seasoned RF technician I believe that the level of RF emitted from a PC would be so incredibly low the receiving antenna would need to be in very close proximity.

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theferndog

All computers put off some form of radiation, which used to be one way to track what a person was doing before the internet allowed us to see traffic and history of websites visited. . So you don't necessarily need an antenna, you do need a way to identify the signal to filter out other radiation which might be what the software installation that they claim is used does. Sort of like when someone transmits through an omnidirectional antenna.

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Teknishun

A computer this noisy would not pass FCC Part 15 guidelines.

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ChangingWinds

what is funny to me is that people think the government follows fcc regs. Like no flying drones out of line of site yet in New Mexico they fly the drones in Afgan. Or the air force that puts out jamming around the bases that actually stops people garage doors from opening with the remote. Or how about more common laws like right to a lawer. Talk to the people the FBI took and denied them a lawer. Or the probably cause.. yet the nsa datamines and gets all our info with no probable cause. This is why big government gives so many problems. Also why our founders favored small government but not no government. I still think as citizen we should sue anytime our rights are violated just so we can use the balance of powers and keep what rights we have. Yet still funny to think someone actually believes the government follows fcc laws.. even when they say this happened outside the usa

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The Mac

In general, government regulations are only applicable to the "public" not the government itself.

Im not sure why this is a surprise.

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ChangingWinds

Actually the right to a lawer is in the us const. and so is the probable cause. meaning a right of the citizen the government can't take away. However it's a civil case because the government will not file on itself. Most people do not know they can file a case against the government. With the datamining you have to show they took your info so they hide behind classified access so you never know. In the USA the amendments to the const. is suppose to mean more than a bill or act. such as the patriot act which is why every time someone brings it to federal court all charges get dropped before any ruling can be made by the court. however you misunderstand the surprise.. I'm surprised someone thinks the government follows fcc regs, not that it thinks itself above us law.

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The Mac

i dont know what you are on about with lawyers, it has nothing to do with FCC regs.

as i stated, they only apply to the public.

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NVZBLT

Nope. even at 2.4mhz (which is a horrible bandwidth) low power devices can have a range of several miles. look up zigbee. at very low speeds yes but still an insane range. If you use a different frequency altogether you could probably send out a signal clean across the country. Now if you were paranoid and removed all wifi and ethernet and even usb, guess what? you forgot one wee little component capable of using almost any frequency.
THE AUDIO PORT. this little baby can and is used to create wireless signals. The NSA wouldn't need to physicly touch your device. with a small script you could use the audio port to send out signal on military frequencies which range is almost limitless on.
Heck even my shity sony phone uses my audio jack to recieve and interpret local fm radio.

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Teknishun

Your audio jack receives local FM? You'll have to explain that one to me. Sometime the antenna is combined with the audio port so the headphone cable acts as the receiving antenna. This is completely different than the actual audio hardware receiving or producing any RF. There is still a FM radio receiver inside your Sony Phone

Also, at frequencies this low, low enough to be generated in the audio hardware, how would you ever have an effective radiator? If we were to build a dipole for a 20,000 Hz (upper limit of audio hardware) signal each leg would be 11700FT long. The ridiculous size of low frequency radiators is precisely why transmission in these bands is not commonplace.

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kixofmyg0t

Let me guess, the NSA can tap into powerline routers anywhere in the world from any wall outlet too.

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Teknishun

Methinks you get it. RF is a complicated world. I'm calling this whole article mostly false.

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mchltang

Every time after I see an NSA leak post I think "how much worse can it get than this?" something else comes up about the NSA and the cycle starts all over again. Nobody is safe in this age.

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Scatter

I guess it depends on what you mean by safe. Honestly I don't think that the government really cares what websites I visit or what films I watch on Netflix. And if by some odd chance that do find me that interesting I'd personally find it both amusing and sad.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

I'm just grateful that our government steals a third of my income to fund this shit.

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jesse_n_sf

Damn, even our PC's need to be super shielded. Get out the tin foil covers.... And Pull out all wireless technology.

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r3dd4wg

I think a Faraday cage around the PC should be enough.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

I believe a grounded wire screen around the PC will prevent any sort of radio-frequency scanning. In the service, we called boxes outfitted with screen Tempest machines. Some machines would just use a fine wire mesh surrounding rubber seals along various joints and seams.

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Random

Well so much for just unplugging your PC from the network to prevent spying. Maybe tinfoil hats really ARE the solution!

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EKRboi

hahaha! I couldn't scroll down fast enough to pretty much say the same thing, only to find you beat me to it! =)

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maleficarus™

LOL

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Biceps

Time to build a Faraday Cage in your office!

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theferndog

I actually used the Faraday Cage and wifi absorbing paints as part of an idea for my degree in a way to develop a secure network. All you really need is chicken wire and you can build a working Faraday Cage.

http://www.lessemf.com/paint.html

http://www.ehow.com/how_6618709_build-faraday-cage.html

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Leo Scott

Maybe if you are a Mexican drug cartel. That's one use of the NSA that I fully approve of.

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vrmlbasic

Why do we need the NSA to spy on Mexican drug cartels? A little border security would go a long way towards stopping that. I'm still mystified as to how they keep digging these engineered tunnels into our country, tunnels that are only stopped after they've been used for a while.

The NSA stops nothing, at least nothing really worth stopping.

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The Mac

Time to make your office a Faraday Cage.