Microsoft May Ditch the Charms Bar in Windows 9

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Dethstar

Witnessing our IT guys testing windows 8 on a small but brave trial group of unsuspecting lawyers was genuinely hysterical until they started calling and emailing me to ask IT to put them back urgently and therefore degrading my own productivity as well as there own.

I have never seen such sheer fury and raw emotion (pity it was so negative) from usually very calm and extremely measured colleagues some of which I had not realised even had normal human emotions before. Just kidding, they are all a lovely bunch but it has to be said, stone faced professional in all but these circumstances.

But, perhaps this is it and windows 9 will show some learning has been done during Vista and Windows 8. Those people that simply suck down the corporate kool aid afraid to do their job and actually create products people want rather than products their boss wants them to try and peddle would be a major step forward.

But please. Sort out the awful issues and processes surrounding activation. Much of my own anti MS sentiment (post snowden revelations aside but never ignored) stem from the ridiculous attempt to bind OS to hardware and doing it badly. Windows 7 was actually a great product in my book other than being crippled by intrusive and inappropriate activation technologies. I know in my own company this lead to servers being migrated off MS product and opened the door to competitors simply because MS are no longer trusted by default.

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Rift2

Windows 8.1 is soooo bad Microsoft make it better like it wuz =)
Core audience for Windows are people who don't leave the house and complain about the awesome charms bar =)

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axiomatic

What charms bar? I'm running Windows 8.1 I've never used a charms bar. (evil grin)

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donut

How do you get the blue Windows icon on the charms bar?

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tekknyne

windows key + r, "control", oh there's the control panel.

That's about my strategy as the IT guy/power user at my company :)

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Blues22475

I didn't find the Charms bar particularly useful and it was just confusing to some users who wanted to do a simple thing like shut their computer down. Granted, they fixed it in 8.1 where it's not even needed to shut the system down.

If they claim they're "listening" to the customers then they know there's a hell of alot more they need to do to fix the OS for the desktop version at least.

Like someone else said, seems like they tried a "One size fits all" UI and expected people to flock and use it like every other OS MS has released.

Some folks are cool with Windows 8: good for you. Seems like 3/4 of the people I spoke to always seem to utter, "I don't like Windows 8; it's too confusing."

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WarpathPS

Windows 8.1 works great and is simple to use. Anyone advocating anything different has spent zero time with the OS or is retarded towards all things technology.

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Gonga

Win 8 contains significant improvements under the hood, and even above the hood. The real problem came when the decision-makers decided to remove the Start button. They thought maybe they could force a sea-change to a tablet-style interface. The Apple-esque notion that "people don't know what they want until you give it to them" seemed to have taken root among MS executives. But unlike Mac users, WinTell users want choices and like to design their own hardware and make big usability mods to the GUI. If, on the other hand, they had created the Start Menu, Charm Bar, etc., as a second screen which did not interfere with the desktop, Win 8 would today be not only the best OS but also the most popular. If MS is smart (and I see no signs of this as the CEO is talking about nothing but "big data" (= big brother), they will stop shoving stuff down the throats of their users vis-a-vis Apple and just give us tech improvements with choices.

In any case, Windows users still have a powerful, and above all, supremely flexible OS and can modify their hardware and GUI interface as before. All the flap is a bit overblown.

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tekknyne

supply-side economics at its finest. thanks apple, fuu****uuuuck u

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Chad727

"According to Winbeta.org, Windows 9 will be very different from Windows 8/8.1 with the desktop taking center stage once again." That really says it all, doesn't it? Now back it up Windows!

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maxeeemum

Microsoft will have to do a lot lot lot more than getting rid of the Charms Bar and bringing back the Start Menu (w/Metro). So far I don't see a real attempt by M$ to get back to a real Desktop OS. Just smoke and mirrors to fool the uninformed! Windows 7, Vista and XP still are better than 8 or what I see coming in 9.

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surfinsam

What about keeping the charms bar just when your using a Modern UI app or are on the start menu, but when running desktop apps its diabled

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donut

It's GREAT for tablets, but terrible for desktop users.

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WarpathPS

I use it on my desktop and my tablet, works great for both. Did you suck at DOS, 3.11, 95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, and Windows 7 as well?

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

"It's only a matter of time before we see how much Microsoft learned fom Windows 8/8.1 and the feedback it received from users."

Don't understand what you're getting at, because Microsoft doesn't consider feedback from users. For the past three years, it's been "They're holding it wrong" on steroids. No company on the planet is more tone deaf.

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WarpathPS

Microsoft knows as well as I do that the "feedback" is from people who do not own the OS. Why on Earth would you not like Windows 8.1 when it has a windows 7 desktop and can be used for a touchscreen device? Lets just make 6 different OS's for you guys who apparently can't use Windows 7 with an added Start Screen.....

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spacemonkiee

I for one will miss charms, while I do agree that learning to use them with a non-touchscreen is cumbersome and certainly could of been better implemented, the functionality they introduced was fantastic. A few callouts would be the easy to use push capabilities of the devices charm (miracast), the quick thumb friendly dashboard of the settings charm ie; screen brightness, wifi-settings, and the three click sharing to social networks and email.

People claim to want innovation, but it seems what people really want is slightly updated revisions of the same old, just look at call of duty 42 or the never ending streams of remakes coming out of Hollywood for proof.

I for one salute Microsoft for trying something different.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Isn't that just special....

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DoctorX

good riddance... but i honestly could care less at this point... i have moved to linux mint 17 mate... and could not be happier... testing my games in crossover and native. out of 540 steam games (yea i have been at this a while), 120 are linux native... the rest i am testing in crossover. My results floored me... so far about 1/5th through and 112/136 work with no issues... or about %82.35 success rate. The ones that do not work ... i dont play anyways. We shall see what it looks like in a month... but so far the ones i have been playing work just fine... including nascar 2013.

At one point i would have been thrilled about the next windows and would have jumped on it... but win 8.x isnt another vista... it is worse....

MS only did this to themselves... when they told us testers to go pound sand when we warned them this would happen.

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JosephColt

Window 8 isn't worse than Vista. With Start8 or Classic Shell it is better than 7. This is just their cycle, good, bad, good, bad. good. Although we shouldn't have to resort to third party software to make it comfortable and usable for people, but my point still stands.

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fung0

Good grief I'm tired of this glib good-bad myth, which persists in defiance of the historical facts.

Windows 1.0 - stupid tiled UI
Windows 286/386 - not bad
Windows 3.0 - breakthrough!
Windows 3.1 - even better
Windows 3.11 - even betterer
Windows 95 - excellent
Windows NT - brilliant, but different
Windows 98 - excellenter
Windows Me - buggy mess
Windows 2000 - even better than NT
Windows XP - nirvana
Windows Vista - bomb
Windows 7 - mostly great
Windows 8 - stupid tiled UI

If there's a pattern there, I sure don't see it.

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core

Actually, it holds true for the consumer line of Windows OS since Windows 95. Windows NT and Windows 2000 used the NT kernel effectively making it a different OS than the MS-DOS based Windows such as Windows 3, 95, 98, and ME. The NT kernel based OS is more stable and aimed at the business market. Windows XP which is an NT Kernel OS marks the point where the consumer version of Windows and the business version of Windows became the same. Following the consumer line of the Windows operating system exposes the good/bad pattern since Windows 95.

Windows 95 – Good
Windows 98 – Buggy
Windows 98 SE – Good
Windows ME – Horrible
Windows XP – Marvelous
Windows Vista – Buggy (Vista was better after a couple of Service Packs. I think it’s underappreciated.... for gaming not so much)
Windows 7 – Outstanding
Windows 8 – (Microsoft panics over tablets and the cloud = Bad)

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JosephColt

Matter of perspective. Their cycle of good and bad is fairly recent. Windows 9 is supposed to have the Start Menu back, no charms, and should be a success I am estimating which would further contribute to the cycle. Windows 10 will be much more cloud based which will upset a lot of people I am sure, which means a bad release.

Windows 98 - Succeeded
Windows Me - Failed
Windows 2000 - Succeeded
Windows XP - Succeeded
Windows Vista - Failed
Windows 7 - Succeeded
Windows 8 - Failed

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spacemonkiee

Don't bother feeding the trolls bud, some people have their mind made up the minute their expectations don't match the reality of something.

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JosephColt

You obviously have no idea what the definition of a troll is if you think someone with a different option in a troll.

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dbqfan

It was a major mistake to try and build a do it all OS. Desktop users do not want Metro or Charms Bars or anything that is associated with tablet or phone users. MS should have developed a separate OS for tablets and phones. I got so mad with Office 10 and MS trying to force me into monthly or annual subscriptions that I dumped and switched to Kingsoft Office Suite. I have had no problems and actually I really prefer it to MS Office.

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JosephColt

I disagree. Having it built in as a feature for Windows for X86 tablets is awesome, but it should be able to be disabled if the user wants it.

Metro interface befits the Surface Pro for example. Also having an integrated software center similar to in Linux would be great. They just need to get rid of charms, let software in the app store run in either the traditional view or the tablet mode, and give users the option to enable or disable it metro entirely.

Personally I think metro is an ugly mess at the moment, but it has a lot of potential.

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BlazePC

Speak for yourself dbqfan.
These edicts that "Desktop users... don't want - blah blah blah" come off like emo-tantrums. The Modern tiles and the Charms bar are handy items for many in the Win 8 desktop user pool. And Office 10 as a stand-alone application installation is just fine - what you going on about? On second thoughts, don't answer that.

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DoctorX

speak for yourself blazepc... it was just bad and no fanboyism is going to change that... even ms has acknowledged it. You can keep your crappy win8.x if you love it ... but the rest of us didnt ... so we wont.

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fung0

It's not that Metro has no benefits for anybody. Even the worst design will find at least a few random fans. What is indisputable, however, is that:

a) Metro adds no benefit for the vast majority of desktop users, who already had plenty of non-Metro options for doing all the same stuff); and

b) Metro adds needless confusion to the Windows UI and a needless split in the Windows API, again, while accomplishing nothing that couldn't be done perfectly well before.

The all-in-one OS is about as useful as a Swiss Army Knife. It's great in exactly the right circumstances - but very few people want to eat all their meals with a spork.

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BlazePC

The Start Screen (they stopped calling it Metro ages ago btw ...) is simply the full screen version of a start menu. If you don't see that, and instead cling to the slim minority of anti-anything-Win8-tards incessantly exuding butt hurt on the interwebs, have at it. And that bit about it adding some level of confusion ... LMAO. If you can be confused by something so simple I'd suggest going back to school.

iOS awaits you ...

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Gezzer

This whole "It's better/It stinks" debate was old a year ago.

Maybe Win8 was an improvement for some, maybe not for others. But it comes down to one thing and one thing only. Ballmer tried to leverage his desktop/Xbox user base to gain mobile user share in a move out of Apple's playbook, and seemed to forget all about the many XP users MS never moved to Vista. Which wasn't nearly the jarring move that moving to 8 was. This isn't anything new for Microsoft, they've tried it before in other areas and it almost always ends badly.
So if you love 8, good for you, (see that's how not to be a condescending jerk). But many, myself included, didn't because it was an unneeded release that served MS much more then it did desktop users.

Oh and BTW the new "Start Screen" is not the same as the start menu was, not by a long shot. It takes up too much desktop real estate, and there is no menu nesting, both making it much less efficient for M&KB users. Plus it forces users to adapt to it, which no good UI should.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again. If Ballmer hadn't been such a dickhead, and actually thought about what they were creating they would have made everything designed for mobile users optional for desktop users. Not changed the desktop too much and given us the ability to run Win8 apps in windows on the normal desktop.
Then all they would of needed to do was track app downloads/sales and how many were being run in window mode and they'd know everything they'd need for Win9. Move us further away from the start menu/desktop version or retain it for desktop users. But that would take brains over balls, and we all know where Ballmer's strengths lay.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

What a delight to see this flaccid little troll crawl out from under his little bridge. Does Judson give you a pat on the head for each of these posts?

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BlazePC

It's pretty handy once you get accustomed to it.

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Granite

I don't think they'll get rid of it...but if they do, I'll adapt.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

Oh, thank goodness. Everyone was wondering how it might affect you.

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nyjets011269

STFU.

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

LOL. Fanboi rage.

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SliceAndDice

I hope they keep it. I'm so used to it that I go for it to shut down Windows 7 machines. #QUITMESSINGWITHMYHEAD

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Random

Good riddance to the Charms bar. Although I'll believe MS will ditch it only when I actually see it. Hopefully they'll also ditch the Metro UI and the annoying "Ribbon" in MS Office products.

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Scatter

We don't need a Windows 9 yet.

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JosephColt

Windows 8 brand name is ruined, and now they will fix everything and release it properly in 9.

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Scatter

I really don't have a problem with Windows 8 or 8.1. I hate that they removed the Windows 7 Start menu but it was easily replaced by a 3rd party option and it can be easily returned by Microsoft in a Windows 8 update as well.

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Jeffredo

Good.