MakerBot 3D Printers Infiltrate a Dozen Home Depot Stores in Three States

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wolfing

3d printing is something that once in a while I consider doing, normally when some kickstarter or an article like this pops up. But so far I've resisted the temptation for several reasons... Technology is still too early, which means higher rate of failure, high maintenance, still too pricey, but beyond all, I doubt I'll be using it that much after the initial 'I got a 3D printer!' period (which will probably about last about 2-4 weeks).

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firefox91

Agreed. I love tech, but I always wait on it. I wait until the major bugs have been resolved and for it to get cheaper.

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John Pombrio

Good Choice. Unless you can actually see a need for it, you do not really need one. I wish I followed THAT rule with my woodworking machines, heh. go online and do an image search on 3D printers projects.

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tekknyne

3D Printers are all the craze because websites say they're all the craze.

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John Pombrio

Cheaper is NOT better in the case of plastic extruding 3D printers. Alignment, consistent flow, and accuracy is essential for making anything larger than a salt shaker. You would be hard put to make a coffee cup for instance as the accuracy on the inexpensive machines would allow too much play in the heads.

When a $2-3,000 metal sintering machine comes out, then it will be time to look at 3D printers. These cheap plastic ones are just toys.

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NavarWynn

The patents are expiring this year, so we'll see what comes out in the soon thereafter. I'm with you though!

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tekknyne

Agree 100%. DBTFH. Dont Believe The F****** Hype.

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Hey.That_Dude

So I've made this comment before, but I guess now is a good time to make it again: "Given how important his technology is and now given how far it's come (all the way to stores!), would you be willing to do an article reviewing all of the currently available technologies behind 3D printing?"

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John Pombrio

Just go to a Maker Faire. You will see DOZENS of 3D printer manufacturers. Or check out the Maker magazine web page for some reviews.

My take from reading reviews? they are fussy machines requiring a great deal of hassle to properly align. They also make nothing that I had said to myself "that is a great use for a plastic printer!"

Finally, so many, many people who own the machines sell every conceivable thing you can think of. No reason at all to buy one and fuss over it for weeks while learning its foibles.

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Hey.That_Dude

Custom cases for my electronic packages. Some amount of creativity and professionalism is nice. There are a few public pay-to-print services in my area (I'm lucky), but it comes down to how much I'll use it in the end. After about 10 prints I might as well have bought my own printer. Also, if they can custom make plastics for the printer, I'd also like to do "Lost wax" casting for my mother's small jewelry business, using "clean burn" out plastic (i.e. no char residue).

Thanks for the point to Makerzine.com

On a side note:
The only thing that I can think I would send out for would be if I wanted aluminum facing on one side, as I have no metal working skills.

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b_c_pc

FYI, the second listed link ("website") in the article appears to be currently broken.

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Paul_Lilly

Fixed -- thanks for the heads up!

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Eoraptor

I'm still waiting for the other shoe to drop on this... for some organization akin to RIAA to start suing little old ladies and kicking down the doors of eight year olds for illegally downloading paperclips and pokemon mold files. this is far too disruptive a technology for the entrenched interests to let it stand.

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John Pombrio

Plastic? No. Metal sintering? Now that will be a disruptive technology.