Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Review

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Rift2

I sub to max PC for Katherine Alone =)

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gamewizard

Hey some of us nerds love the look of the thinkpad series I know I love mine!!!!

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Danthrax66

WHY DIDN'T YOU REVIEW THE TOUCH SCREEN ONE?

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katherine

I wrote this review for our December 2012 issue, which we were working on in October--long before the X1 with touchscreen, or any other touchscreen Ultrabooks were available. I hope to review the touchscreen version in the future.

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stradric

Good write-up, except I would have liked to have seen how the price compares against the zero-point machine. i.e. For all that drop in performance, is it at least significantly cheaper?

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katherine

The zero-point machine is a reference Ultrabook from Intel, not something that is available for retail.

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HiGHRoLLeR038

These things are a nightmare to support from an enterprise standpoint. If this is your company's first go at ultrabooks, you'll have no spare parts to use to repair these things. Not even Lenovo has parts! We had to get a few RMAd and repaired... took 2 months!!!!!! And this is a common thing with ultrabooks, but no ethernet port! Only two USB ports, and the port replicator you can buy for it is pretty shady.

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vrmlbasic

Only Intel HD 4000 graphics, coupled with a mere 1600*900 screen? It's been said that this resolution is suitable for this screen size, and that the HD 4000 "GPU" doesn't blow. I have a Lenovo Yoga, which sports a screen of same resolution and "GPU", and I can now say that this resolution and GPU are wholly inadequate.

If this is what Intel is bringing to the Ultrabook party, at 1300 bucks to boot, then AMD's "sleekbook" could effortlessly claim the segment. I'm not sure how this ultrabook costs so much; the price must be for the carbon fiber as it can't be for the solidly "meh" components.

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And3rs0nTX

Ultrabooks are a joke. Overpriced and under powered.

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Cregan89

Overpriced? Yes.
Under powered? Not at all.

The majority of Ultrabooks are far more than capable of everything short of graphically intense games and realtime HD video editing (and even then there are Ultrabook models with discreet GPUs that can handle these tasks to a certain degree).

We use solely Ultrabooks at my company and we run massive databases and development environments on them and they handle it without a hiccup, and at under 3 lbs.

I'd like to see you whip out your desktop PC or even your 17" Alienware whatever at a conference meeting, on a plane, or to do some remote debugging on site...

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livebriand

This looks great, but the main thing that makes it a non-seller for me is the proprietary SSD, and to a lesser extent, the non-upgradable RAM. SSDs are bound to get cheaper in the next few years, and considering that they're probably the most failure prone part of a laptop (aside from the battery), I'd rather not have one that'll be hard to find replacements for.

(in case you hadn't guessed it from this post, the MBA also doesn't appeal to me for the same reasons)

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knurly

Been using an X1 Carbon as my daily biz machine for about 5 months - got it right when released. I can vouch for all the points made in the review.

I would never consider this a gaming rig, but performance is fine for business and programming tasks. That fast recharge ability has saved me several times between hopping flights.

Only quirk not mentioned is the funny little "clunk" feeling of the track pad when making tapping gestures. Tracking is great, but it feels like the glass surface is a little loose. I've read a few other comments about this so I know its not just my unit.

Overall a super nice machine.

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Strangelove_424

"An Ultrabook that makes no Mac pretenses" except for the price, which at 1300 head-spinning dollars, you forgot to mention.

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DeltaFIVEengineer

Yea.... I'll stick with the MBA, thanks.

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big_montana

$1300 is for the Carbon with touch screen, as it is $1100 without a touchscreen. Still on the high side no matter how you cut it, but this is an enterprise laptop hence the Thinkpad nomenclature. If it was being marketed at consumer sit would not be all high end and be an Ideapad instead.