Your Tablet Benchmarks Suck

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vrmlbasic

I still don't quite understand why I should be interested in tablet benchmarks. I can't upgrade their components, I don't think that I can overclock them and I don't do any CPU/GPU-intensive real work on them; does anyone?

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tony2tonez

If you root your device, there are custom roms that will you to over/underclock and other various system tweeks. For better optimization.

I agree mostly, I dont care for benchmarks at this point and no intense real work.

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Keith E. Whisman

I like how you call something that happened 10 years ago "the early days of computers" I'm 41 and I've been playing around with computers since I was a wee tyke of 8 years. Ten years ago the Pentium 3 and 4 were top dogs. I remember playing games on 8088 and 8086 processors. I remember playing around with my Commodore 64, Atari 800 and TRS 80. I remember toying around with various Tandy computers. Even I didn't live in the early part of computers, and old friend of mine used to build his computers by soldering circuits together from plans and kits. He still has some of them where you entered commands via flip switches and recorded output via on and off lights. His advanced stuff used one inch paper tape with dots printed on it as output. Those were the early days of computers and really the very old days of computers go back to ancient china with the abacus.

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Scatter

The author probably means his early days of computers ;)

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vrmlbasic

The Pentium III was still around in 2003?! I remember it being pretty ancient by then as that was years after the Pentium 4 debuted. I remember the issues with the over-1 Ghz P3s; I still have a slew of 933 mhz socketed P3s here lol.

I think that you're giving the chinese too much credit. Reminds me of that "china invented the world" book that came out a few years ago, which stipulated that the chinese started the European renaissance (facepalm).

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JCGPZ9

The Tualatin Pentium 3 models were quite nice and still very competitive with the early Pentium 4 and you could pair those with SDRAM, DDR SDRAM and RAMBUS (ugh). It was also a time when AMD was extremely competitive.

At that time I built myself an nForce 2 Ultra w/ XP2800+ DDR400 and rockin' a Radeon 9700 Pro. Didn't feel like it was that long ago to be honest...

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MiGreen

Windows phone?

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AFDozerman

Very apple-like response. Our products aren't faulty. You're just using them wrong.

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Insula Gilliganis

Quoting AnandTech.. " With the exception of Apple and Motorola,.."

I only read this to see if Gordon would acknowledge that Apple wasn't doing this.. and, as expected, he didn't mention it.

Benchmarking cheating starts to occur only when it is harder and harder for companies to innovate and for products to distinguish themselves from each other.

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Hey.That_Dude

1) Apple doesn't need to do this. They control their entire product line with an Iron Curtain.
2) Apple does this anyways, they make their chips from the ground up to run iOS better than any other core on the market. BUT they can do that because of point #1. Therefore any code that is optimized for iOS will run quite well on an iPhone.

Honestly, why would anyone mention that? The Motorolla thing, however, that is interesting.

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dgrmouse

It's silly the way the article describes the practice of optimizing for certain benchmarks as a thing of the past for PCs. In fact, the major substance of pretty much every maintenance release of every graphics card driver is to optimize for the latest benchmarks (games). What's the difference?

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Hey.That_Dude

This was addressed in the article; or did you not read it?
Just for you, I'll give you a brief summation: Optimizing for a real workload is SMART. Optimizing for a synthetic workload is DUMB, and can sometimes hurt real world performance.

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Refuge88

"and well as Samsung."

Second to last paragraph, is that a typo?

"As well as Samsung." perhaps?

Interesting article, I have faith that mobile benchmarks will mature in time, and if not, they will all eventually be on x86 architectures anyhow and then we will have access to our real world benchmarks... Or am I wrong in my prediction of where mobile seems to be going?

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jimmthang

Nice catch. Fixed.