Google Unveils HP Chromebook 11 with IPS Display, Exynos Processor for $279

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AGVirt

(Hit submit twice by mistake)

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AGVirt

Give Google and their hardware partners credit for sticking with the Chromebook, despite a lot of resistance. The more improvements they make, the more the Chromebook becomes attractive to more users.

But what about Chromebook users that need to access Windows applications like Microsoft Office, or that want to connect to work applications like CRM and ERP from home? They can try products like Ericom AccessNow, an HTML5 RDP solution that enables Chromebook users to connect to Terminal Servers and/or VDI virtual desktops, and run Windows applications or desktops in a browser tab.

There's nothing to install on the Chromebook, so AccessNow is easy to deploy and manage.

For an online, interactive demo, open your Chrome browser and visit:
http://www.ericom.com/demo_AccessNow.asp?URL_ID=708

Please note that I work for Ericom

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vrmlbasic

Wow, this is on par with my 3 year old netbook (maybe this "exynos" beats the atom but that wouldn't say much). Only my 3 year old netbook is capable of functioning as a stand alone machine.

I don't believe that it is possible for a display to be both "high quality" and only 1368*768.

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Innomasta

chromebooks are flopping just as much as the RT platforms, but here's the thing: UNLIKE RT/WIN8, They weren't forced on the masses as a replacement to 7, and as such nobody is bitching about them. They occupy their own little 1% of the market and everyone is happy.

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Cregan89

I think you missed the part in the article about how the Samsung Chromebook has been the number 1 selling notebook on Amazon for a good part of a year and has a 4/5 rating...

ChromeOS is also currently the fastest growing segment in the PC market.

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Engelsstaub

My daughter's high school issues them to all the students now so perhaps it's making inroads into education too.

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legionera

Isn't it odd??

iOS, ChromeOS and RT have so much in common - they all suck so much because they can't run Legacy and desktop software, but the people somehow find a logical reason to prefer ChromeOS and iOS instead of RT (that at least has Microsoft Office).

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Paper Jam

But here's the thing. If you sat down the average consumer and placed RT and Pro tablets/devices in front of him/her, would they be able to tell the difference? RT looks just like Windows 8 on the surface (pun intended), but doesn't run legacy apps like Win8. ChromeOS looks like ChromeOS, iOS looks like iOS. There is no confusion. If MS had merged WP8 and RT, and made that their unified mobile platform, I don't think they would get so much bad press because people get that mobile is mobile, and desktop is desktop. What they don't get is that mobile is desktop, except when it's RT and isn't.

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legionera

I doubt that the interface is actually such a big problem. While I had an RT I stayed 9/10 of my time in the MetroUI, because there was not much to do in the desktop part anyway (except documents). What I noticed, is that there are 2 OneNote apps - one for the MetroUI and one for the desktop. I suspect that they plan to move to the Metro UI completely at some point, but it would be also a shame to ditch such a convenient file explorer such as the desktop UI.

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MiGreen

There is one explanation, people are motivated by things that aren't necessarily logical or fair. Their Ego can easily say, "If I like it, it's better, no matter those facts."

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legionera

Where does that ego get its inspiration then?