Google Transparency Report Reveals Dramatic Rise in User Data Requests

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karolus_Brasil

Dgrmouse, as you stated that it is not war and peace, but the power to corrupt, I am puzzled the level of corruption in American civil society. Here in Brazil , an ordinary citizen can not this level of access to a base station cell phone to intercept and eavesdrop the communications of others. Only the Federal and State police are capable to monitor several lines at the same time (with recording) . However, if the ideology of American State ( belligerent ) contaminated the civil society, then, American society is sick and is in urgent need of a change order to respect the rights of others (inside and outside) of the USA. In November 2013 , the 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK . A murder with diverse interests: for the successor declared war and the American war industry profited greatly. Statistically speaking, it would be impossible to die so many witnesses to the crime, in such a short time (in the months following the crime). It is unfortunate that a highly technological society has forgotten the human being; better to be human . As John Lennon said, if not mistaken: power to the people !!!

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legionera

that awkward moment when you could still see how high the bars are on the last graph.

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CanoeHead

This is troubling and bears vigilant scrutiny.

However, for every marathon bomber there have been even more thwarted plots. When the intelligence agencies discuss “chatter”, what did people think that they were referring to?

Seems like this is less like catching a pick-pocket in the act, and more like finding out that those “unauthorized” credit card charges were for that big bruiser that’s been following you around at the clubs.

Still, sleep with one eye open. ;)

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karolus_Brasil

Despite the modern concept of the right to privacy have been coined by the Americans Brandeis & Warren and American society have placed some limits on data collection in the 1970s of the twentieth century (the Cold War); currently, this same society can not demonstrate for its rulers, its real dissatisfaction with the growing collection of personal data by government agencies (despite the existence of laws peculiar to inhibit the collection). All this, in my mind, because of the belligerent attitude of the government of USA (say, government, not the people) who want to impose their vision capitalist (imperialist the world), as the old (medieval) Cross (Church) aim to convert crops to their way of distorted view of reality . Thus, to sustain a warfare state, it is necessary a constant state of war (especially after the fateful September 11). So before you complain, you must attack the causes. And the main reason is that the USA to be one belligerent State must impose on its citizens and its visitors, constraints on behalf of the defense of the State. Which I believe is not what the American people want. Because I doubt that the American people prefer to live in eternal war than peace.

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dgrmouse

It's not about war and peace, it's about greed, corruption, and power. For example, if I get a warrant to monitor cell phone conversations or track a particular device, I go down to Verizon and pay them an exorbitant amount of money (thousands of dollars per tower per 15 minutes) for each tower in range. This is just another way for the corrupt to funnel money from a large amount of people into the hands of a small number of people.

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Led Weappelin

I'm surprised the data is as low as it is for the U.S. Matter of fact I'd say they can't tell us the real numbers.

And this coming from a so called "Country Of Freedom".

We are not free. Not even close. We'll always be bound by for lack of a better term "the man".

Turning up the Creedence Clearwater Revival album I'm spinning NOW. :>)

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legionera

oh, you are free, don't worry! :) It is just that people have different perception what "free" and "freedom" actually mean.

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spectrex

Okay .. so we keep seeing all these stories, and it makes me wonder why no one has done a little digging and found out what are the best search engines out there for privacy. I did a search and there are all kinds of search engines that claim to be just that, but which ones can we trust? This is the kind of information I would like to see. How do we get around the all seeing eyes of the government. Is there a web based email service we can trust? What are the alternatives.

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dgrmouse

There was a recent article about Lavabit and their fight against this tyrannical action: http://www.dailytech.com/Owner+of+Lavabit+Faces+10K+Fine+For+Protecting+His+Users+From+Federal+Spying/article33743.htm

According to the article, they demanded decryption keys for /every/ account Lavabit hosted. When they were unable to deliver a subpena, they just installed a bunch of spyware on the servers. Given everything I read on the case, I would probably be inclined to trust Lavabit. Of course, now they've gone out of business to protect themselves from prosecution; a nasty paradox, but I don't see any other way.

Beyond all that, the most popular encryption systems rely on a chain of trust. If the root is compromised - and I have little faith that Verisign and co have refused cooperation - then even encryption may not offer much protection.

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karolus_Brasil

I agree, talking to a manager of a university network of computers (brazilian sourceforge link (UFPR) he reported that encryption software with source code owner always has a back door available for American spy agencies. Also reported that, currently, the GNUPgP for having open source code (to be inspected, whether or not the back door) is the most reliable software for cancellation of the meaning of a message.

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dgrmouse

It's not even just a matter of having source code available. I can absolutely assure you that as a rule open source software has /at least/ as many exploitable issues as its closed-source counterparts. When you factor in the advanced mathematics involved in most encryption schemes, it becomes very difficult for anyone to validate an encryption suite.

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Xenite

Anything US based is subject to the same laws that are forcing Google to disclose the information. Anything outside the US they just illegally intercept, your hosed either way.

Hell, they even compromised the anonymity of Tor. The NSA would make the Nazi's proud. They have infiltrated virtually every aspect of our private life.

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spectrex

Err.... Tor was developed by the US Naval Research Laboratory.

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sotoa

I don't know, but 22,000 requests per year doesn't sound THAT bad. How many various warrants are issued per year for regular stuff?
Considering all the online activity, it doesn't sound as bad. What bothers me is searches done without warrants. And how much $$$ are we spending to spy innocent people.

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DCantu1970

The first thing I thought about after reading your comment was the following quote by Benjamin Franklin:

“Those who surrender freedom for security will not have, nor do they deserve, either one.”

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vrmlbasic

So Google can legally compel Federal Employees (USCG) and state/local government employees, as well as any private-sector employees "in the know", to keep quiet about their mysterious barges yet the feds can keep them from releasing their own info. Guess Google isn't all-powerful after all.

It was all fun and games when Google was just publically aiding and abetting third-world governments and their evil schemes (cough China cough) :(

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Biceps

Thank you for finally reporting on the most important tech story of our lifetimes. Very much appreciated.

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ApathyCurve

Never trust a government, especially your own.

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Mungo

"assuming our dealings online were mostly kept private "

Did anyone really think that was how it is?

Networks are like the crooked card game in the American wild west.

All the players know the card game is fixed but it's the only game in town.