Google Now Reportedly Requires ‘Powered by Android’ Logo on Boot-up

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SilverAura

I honestly don't get the issue here. How is this a move in the wrong direction or an issue at all on Googles' part? Working in the electronics department, you'd be surprised how many people don't realize that their phone is running on Android and/or that Android is actually a Google product.

Sure, you can't constantly be trying to compensate for peoples' stupidity, but you can't blame Google for wanting a little brand recognition connected to such a large product of theirs.

Especially when the difference between a Nexus 5, a Galaxy S4, and an HTC One is enough to throw some people off into thinking they were completely different operating systems.

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lunchbox73

My HTC One M8 doesn't say it's powered by anything when it starts up. I get the HTC logo, then the One logo, then Verizon splash screen.

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vrmlbasic

Another step in the wrong direction by Google.

I guess this flareup of petty pride is indicative of the head-up-posterior attitude that exists at Google. Today I just saw that Google has created a "theme" for Gmail ("Shelfies") where you can use pictures of yourself as themes and send them to others. Apparently Google is so narcissistic these days that they expect that all their users are too.

I just wish they'd roll back the Gmail & Google Maps websites, modernize the Gmail app and remove all of their "soft extortion" with Google+. I shouldn't have to join a social network to place an app review :(

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Eoraptor

I don't see a problem. As it stands now, Google is stuck. Makers like HTC and Samsung take android, and then can wrap their own skin on top of it. Often to the point that the end user doesn't realize that HTC Sense is in fact Operating System that powers Cyanogen Mod or Samsung Galaxy or Migui or so on.

Right now Google runs a risk of others basically claiming all the hard work on the Android Platform done by both it engineers and the open source community going unknown and losing mind-share if it doesn't enforce a little branding. A lot of people think that HTC or Samsung made their device, and forget that the software running it actually comes from someone (or several someones) else.

as to "the whole android experience" plenty of people seem to do just fine on Kindles and other "not-powered-by-Goggle" android experiences; Plus CyanogenMod is GMS certified on at least one device, so obviously it's not the insurmountable barrier some paint it as.

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MaximumMike

>> Often to the point that the end user doesn't realize that HTC Sense is in fact Operating System that powers Cyanogen Mod or Samsung Galaxy or Migui or so on.

Wait... I was honestly trying to follow you, but I'm a little confused by this sentence. Did you mean to say, "Android," instead of, "HTC Sense?"
If so, I think I follow your meaning. If not, I'm at a loss.

>>Right now Google runs a risk of others basically claiming all the hard work on the Android Platform done by both it engineers and the open source community going unknown and losing mind-share if it doesn't enforce a little branding. A lot of people think that HTC or Samsung made their device, and forget that the software running it actually comes from someone (or several someones) else.

I think at this point that anyone who doesn't know that Google developed Android doesn't care, and probably never will. Also, it's plainly stated on all the device specs that they run Android. I think it's a stretch of the imagination that Google is somehow losing name recognition on Android devices. And to the thought that HTC or Samsung made their device... well they did. They designed the hardware, customized Android to provide a unique experience on their device, introduced apps for the device (some good some bad), and did all the product testing before sending it to market. It is as much their device as possibly can be. To call a device like that a Google device would be untrue.

>>as to "the whole android experience" plenty of people seem to do just fine on Kindles and other "not-powered-by-Goggle" android experiences;

That is true, but those devices also have a strong ecosystem of their own. Not everyone who wants to bring a third party Android device to market has Amazon's budget to develop their own ecosystem with. Also, a lot of people who would have otherwise bought a Kindle opted not to because it didn't have GMS.

>>Plus CyanogenMod is GMS certified on at least one device, so obviously it's not the insurmountable barrier some paint it as.

I'm thinking that statement was particularly targeted at me. So, let me clarify that I never said it was impossible to get GMS certified, just that it was difficult and expensive. I also said that I believe Google will make it more difficult as they move forward. And we have every indication that they will. Here's a good article that summarizes the basics of how Google is using GMS to make Android less open. I'd be curious to hear your thoughts after you've read it.

http://www.infoq.com/news/2014/01/android-closed-source-model

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MaximumMike

double post

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AFDozerman

Not really a big deal, but it signals a move in the wrong direction.

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LatiosXT

For what?

Google doesn't care what you do with Android itself. But they do care if you want to bundle their apps as part of stock features. Cyanogenmod, much to my "herp derp" surprise doesn't ship with Google apps (which includes the app store), you have to side load it. You could get away with not having the Google ecosystem on your phone, but the problem is that Android and Google go hand in hand so much that not including them is kind of odd to the average user.

At least it's just "Powered by Android" and not "Powered by Google".

How else could I put it?... It's like Linux and the desktop distros. Stallman is so insistent on calling it GNU/Linux because he believes GNU licensed apps are what makes Linux what it is, at least on the desktop. Google wants device makers to acknowledge "hey, our apps made Android what it is".

Though I guess Google "enforcing" it is sort of different.

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MaximumMike

Cyanogenmod doesn't distribute GMS (Google Maps and Services) because they are not allowed to. GMS is the tool Google is using to make Android closed while claiming it is open. Most of the functionality developers want access to are being moved out of Android and into GMS. So, while Android is open, GMS is proprietary, and though technically free to use, expensive to get certified. And it is through these expensive certifications that Google is weaseling out smaller independent developers like the guys over at Cyanogenmod. Unless Google changes their practices with GMS, you will find it becomes increasingly more difficult to do anything outside of what Google allows the big vendors like Samsung and HTC to do with it.

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LatiosXT

What functionality? The services that Google provides on commercial phones? What's stopping someone else from making their own service?

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MaximumMike

The same thing that's stopping them from writing their own operating system... nothing. But what has that to do with how open Android is?