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 Post subject: How do you install a program in Kubuntu?
PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 5:33 pm 
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I have installed the most recent edition of Kubuntu for for 64bit. I downloaded Firefox 3.5 to a Documents folder. When I extracted the files nothing happened. Can't find anything that resembles a "setup" file. How do you install a program without the setup executable file?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:42 pm 
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000
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Typically you'd install software through synaptics.

Most software is installed manually though (i.e. you build it yourself). There's really no setup exe like you're used to seeing in windows.

Firefox should be available in synaptics. If you downloaded something from mozilla's site, then you probably just downloaded a binary, so it's just a matter of finding where you extracted to and running the executable file. Perhaps extracting again will give you a clue as to where it all went :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:31 am 
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Well, that all seems pretty reasonable except there is no file with an exe file extension in the folder it extracted to. Lots of files with .ini attached but no .exe anywhere. ????? Is there anyone in here that can give me a step by step how to? I am not even a novice here. You must assume that I know absolutely nothing about Linux programs because I actually know nothing about Linux at all.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 3:49 am 
TravBv2.0
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Ok, that file you downloaded? Delete it. All of it.

Windows and Linux handle getting your apps differently. For Windows, we're very used to hunting down the apps we want on the web, downloading them, and installing them one by one, right? I know I do this. VLC, Winamp, Chrome, Opera, PalmInfoCenter (for my phone), Firefox..... You get my drift.

For Linux, instead of going here and there for your apps, we download our applications and install them automatically from software repositories managed by the OS vendor. I'm not a KDE user, so I can't tell you exactly how to get to Synaptic, or Add/Remove (both of which largely do the same thing). If you open up a terminal or shell, doing it via command line isn't hard.
In this case, you want firefox. at a shell prompt (which should look like

username@hostname:~$

you'd type this

sudo apt-get install firefox

You'll be prompted for the root password (the main system password that you setup at install time). Kubuntu would then look to it's own software repo for Firefox, download the file, install it automatically, and then you're done. You should then see Firefox as one of your installed applications. Once you start it up, it won't be the latest version I'd bet. From Firefox, you can download and install (automatically once again) the latest version.

Hope this has helped.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:41 am 
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The file I downloaded was from the Firefox website, specifically for 64bit machines running the Linux platform. How do you find the command line?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:57 am 
Northwood
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In the top menu bar where you see Applications, Places and System select System, then Administration, then Synaptic Package Manager. Enter your root password. Select Search and enter Firefox. You will see several choices so select the tickmark next to Firefox by right clicking it and selecting mark for installation. This will select Firefox and all its dependent files. Select apply and the package manager will download all the necessary files and install Firefox. Bam, you're done and Firefox is installed and ready to use.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 5:52 am 
TravBv2.0
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TheSimulatorGuy wrote:
In the top menu bar where you see Applications, Places and System select System, then Administration, then Synaptic Package Manager.


Is there a top bar in KDE? I could've sworn it was much more Windows-ish. Clicking the K on the bottom left-hand corner is akin to a Windows start menu.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 6:01 am 
TravBv2.0
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RavenStandsAlone wrote:
The file I downloaded was from the Firefox website, specifically for 64bit machines running the Linux platform. How do you find the command line?


To just downlaod an app from the wild web for any *buntu (or any Linux based on Debian), the file would have to be in a .deb form. This is the .exe eqivalent to Windows, in a way. For Red Hat type systems, you'd be looking for .rpm. Linux files like this are often referred to as packages.

To find the command line, look through your installed applications. After pressing the "K" button on the bottom, You'll probably see application sub-categories like "System", "Internet", and "Audio/Video." Look through these until you find Konsole.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:32 pm 
Million Club - 5 Plus*
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Simpler:

Alt-F2, type konsole, hit enter.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:45 pm 
Monkey Fed [PC]
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cat wins.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 5:13 pm 
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Got it from the command line. Thanks guys, that was fun.

Raven


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:34 pm 
Klamath
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RavenStandsAlone wrote:
Got it from the command line. Thanks guys, that was fun.

Raven


learning linux is an adventure.
It made me love computers all over again...as my goal was to discover how I could do everything in linux...the way I do in Windows.
The only snag you will hit is playing games....although there are some programs for linux that allow you to run a limited number of windows games....not all games will work (unless you use a virtual manager like VMWare or Virtualbox)
Ubuntu is a easy enough distro to learn/grow with.
I myself started with another Debian based distro called Xandros.
For sheer friendliness and ease of use...Ubuntu wins hands down.
If you ever hit a snag somewhere...google it. Lots of other users will have had the same problems...and you can learn how to solve your problem.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 9:04 am 
Northwood
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that Linux guy wrote:
TheSimulatorGuy wrote:
In the top menu bar where you see Applications, Places and System select System, then Administration, then Synaptic Package Manager.


Is there a top bar in KDE? I could've sworn it was much more Windows-ish. Clicking the K on the bottom left-hand corner is akin to a Windows start menu.


That post was made on a ubuntu machine.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 2:17 pm 
Spam Overload
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just for fun clarification file extensions really don't mean as much on linux as they do in windows... obviously we have the convention that an mp3 is an audio file and mpeg is a movie and so on but .bat, .exe, .com and .dll are pretty much all Microsoft conventions. With linux you "can" try to run any file you want at the terminal by typing ./somefile.extension

Linux might say, warning this is a binary file are you sure you want to run this? This is because the ./ command is typically used more with shell scripts and works regardless of the file extension or whether or not a file even has an extension.

FYI...


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