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 Post subject: I am stuck with what to do, please direct me.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 11:39 pm 
Coppermine
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I have taken Web Dev, C++, Graphics Design, Flash, and Networking Essentials. I like them all but I don't really connect.

I always wanted to make web pages...but always wanted to learn to program but with C++ it just dropped it down. I like making computers, am interested in hardware as well.

When I started college I knew I wanted to be in something with computers..but the line is getting shorter.

I don't know what else to say right now, sorry. It's late and I'm just burnt after "trying" to finish a Flash Assignment....and the best thing about this is that since I failed C++ I need to get a 3.33 GPA or I will go on academic probation for a year.

One last thing-was it hard to learn Flash for anyone? I am just going on a roll, then hit a wall. Then I have to squeeze through a straw in a crack in the wall to get past. Over and over again. I am using Flash CS4.

I will definitely have more to say as people add to this.....



What should I get into. Right now I am pretty sure I am screwed because the teacher seems to have graded everyone else except me.


Last edited by maniacm0nk3y on Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 5:12 am 
Java Junkie
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Is there a question buried in there somewhere?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 1:37 pm 
Coppermine
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What field should I go into. Like something with computers. Close to what I describe? I don't know.

I explained so much and didn't put the simplest thing down.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:56 am 
TravBv2.0
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I can't really comment on the programming. The closest I've come to programming was 1995-esque HTML pages (Thank God Comcast wouldn't let me run a web-server now that I think of it) and a "hello world" BASH script.

On the very common "What career should I do?" question, I can offer some things.

I was much like you a few years ago. I knew I wanted to do something with computers. Unfortunately for the undecided, there are lots of avenues for a career in computers. I was already burnt out on the whole PC-Repair tech thing though. Glad I narrowed that one down.

First, try and decide which one you like more. I have no interest in programming, but networking and hardware is very interesting to me, in that exact order. If you got a degree in CS, you're very flexible in the IT job market. Should you change careers in the middle some where, I'd bet you're closer to going from a hardware engineer to a programmer than the other way.

Also, look at pro's and con's for each type of job. During my mid-teen years, I just wanted to be a tech. After actually doing it for a job, then as my own small business, I decided I wanted a bit more. I wanted more money, I didn't want to be my own boss, I wanted a standard 9-5 work week with the occasional night and weekend, and I wanted a variety of work. After doing my research, I've settled on going into UNIX/Linux system/network administration. Most SysAdmin type positions offer what I'm looking for in a job. I'm not trying to talk about lil ol' me the whole time. My point is that you need to think about what you want from your job too.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 4:37 am 
Java Junkie
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If he has trouble with mathematics and Flash, programming isn't something I recommend for him.

Get any job in the field and start working. Experience will tell you what you like and what you don't. I know that I can't tell you those things.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:50 am 
Coppermine
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I'm interested in building computers and fixing them, as well as the hardware itself.
Flash is just so troubling because of how clumsy it is, in my opinion. Photoshop is easy, just having trouble with a couple of things in it.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 5:00 am 
TravBv2.0
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If you just want to fix computers, it shouldn't be that hard to land a job at a local shop, on-site business, or the closest GeekSqaud (Sorry FireDog). I got my first PC tech gig at PC Club computers in Santa Rosa, California. I was working at Best Buy as a seasonal temp down the street, but I went in often, sometimes just to window shop, other times for repair advice, and yet others for small parts. I ended up buying all the parts to my last computer there. The manager offered me a job there when he had an opening. I ended up getting fired for calling in sick late (long story), but it was a cool job while I had it. I didn't get burned out on the whole tech thing until after I tried making a small business of doing local on-site work. I still think that IQ tests should be taken before you can do things like vote, get a driver's license, etc, and owning a computer is one of those things.

If you don't want to go into business for yourself, and you don't want to work in retail (who does?), then start scouting sites like indeed.com, dice.com, and computerjobs.com for jobs with titles like DST (Desktop Support Technician). Like most IT jobs, the titles vary, but a Support Tech, Field Tech, Service Tech, etc, etc, all equate to a glorified Computer Repair Technician. In a medium to large business setting, they end up handling the trouble tickets that Helpdesk couldn't fix over the phone, or just the less important stuff that the Admins don't have time for.

These type of positions aren't as popular as they once were. More and more medium to large companies buy their computer with warranties and extra manufacturer support, so they don't have to hire techs like you. And even if you do get to grace their offices, you'll void a machine's given warranty if you so much as open the case unless you're manufacturer certified. Also, the companies that do hire full-time techs are sure to keep you very, very busy. You'll probably have more than 300 machines that you'd be responsible for. Being on-call, rotating weekend and evening shifts, lots of headache for slightly above average pay (company and location pending)... these are all parts of a life in IT. However, if you're in IT, and you truly love what you do, the headaches aren't deal breakers.

For starters, just look into getting basic certifications like the A+ and Network+. Both certs are very underrated IMO. Certs are good, Education is much better, but experience is the golden ticket to Wonka land. Even non-professional experience is good. It's not nearly as good as on-the-job professional exprience, but it still shows you can do something instead of memorized some questions about it, or read a large chapter on it.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2009 10:06 pm 
Coppermine
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Good advice for anyone in similar situations.

/edit I forget how slowly these forums can move sometimes.
I was on the second page when I found this post near the top.
Didn't realize it was that old.


Last edited by endersshadow on Sat Nov 28, 2009 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2009 10:21 pm 
Java Junkie
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Please don't bump 7 month old threads.


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