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 Post subject: what OS to learn for MCSE
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:38 am 
Sharptooth
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probably bad i even haveta ask lol. just wanted to get feedback from career IT pro's on:

what OS to learn like the back of my hand in the next 6 months.

what terms are mostly commonly used/employed.

what software plugins/tools to make yourself an over night network admin?

what must i learn how to deploy to be a pro? software apps, security apps, etc?


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 Post subject: Re: what OS to learn for MCSE
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:13 am 
TravBv2.0
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rayatwork05 wrote:
probably bad i even haveta ask lol. just wanted to get feedback from career IT pro's on:


Nothing wrong with asking a question. But do remember that people are generally much more willing to help someone who help's themselves. No sense starting a new thread for something that's an easy search via Google.

rayatwork05 wrote:
what OS to learn like the back of my hand in the next 6 months.


Well, for your MSCE, it depends. There are different MCSE certifications as each version of Windows server comes out. If you're planning on getting the cert soon, an MCSE 2003 is still a very valid certification, as I'm sure plenty of shops are using Windows Server 2003 (Hint, that's the OS you should use). If you're going to the latest MCSE, then get Windows Server 2008. No matter which one you get, set up a private server at home. It runs fine on standard hardware, so don't go plunk down serious cash for a real "server" when your old P4 will work just fine. You'd be hard pressed to learn all the ins and outs of a complex server OS, in addition to the installation, configuration, and administration of all the major network services (I'm thinking SQL, Exchange, ActiveDirectory, IIS, etc.)

rayatwork05 wrote:
what terms are mostly commonly used/employed.


I'm sure it's probably the same tech jargon we use here on teh forumz. (not those last couple words though.) I don't really get this question.

rayatwork05 wrote:
what software plugins/tools to make yourself an over night network admin?


If you're just starting out, being a network administrator takes trust from your company. Being the FNG, you'll most likely be delagated tedious and remedial tasks. If something unimportant needs fixing, your pager will go off. If something major is happening, you'll probably be the gopher (go for). As far as software goes, it will probably be a while before you're in a position to choose. You might not like Norton AV, but if your boss or supervisor tells you install it, shut up and start clicking.

There's really nothing you can do to become as good as a seasoned admin overnight. You've gotta do it. You can read about it, thinking about, even eat, sleep, and breath network administration, but until you land a job actually doing it, you won't be very good. This is pretty common with any job. I work on the night crew at a grocery store. I stock the shelves and such. Despite being a fairly easy job, it takes some getting used to. You aren't truly effective at that job until you've learned what to do, what not to do, and when on both counts. Same logic stands for any job.

rayatwork05 wrote:
what must i learn how to deploy to be a pro? software apps, security apps, etc?


Same as above. For your first while on the job as an admin, don't try to improve anything. Just do your job their way to the best of your abilities, and when you've already proven to them that you know what the hell you're talking about, then propose a change, or an idea.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:33 am 
Sharptooth
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thanks for the reply.

the reason is because:
a) im going to land networking contracts. not remedial 10/hr jobs.
b) i need to know more in order to sound/sell better
c) in the event i do the work myself instead of my network guru on hand, i want to be top notch.

so yes, i do need some more details. mcse isnt as important as what i need to know for real world experience. i can bypass the need for an MCSE by landing contracts. ive taken classes for networking and they've listed sites for free tools that scan and assess network needs based on particular crtieria/goals. i just dont recall the sites or search terms to find what i need. and i need whats most widely known to be the best free/low cost software to do a good job.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:44 am 
TravBv2.0
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It sounds like you're going for more of a contracted consluting or tech gig, rather than a full-time administrator.

Don't just focus on sounding better. Focus on learning as much as you can.

The MCSE certification will probably teach you about %20 of what you really need to know. Having a good working knowledge of VMWare products will also help, as more and more companies are going the server consolidation route. Most companies want to use big-name software, from software companies that have 24/7 tech support, and such. You shouldn't have to worry about bringing your own software to work. They'll provide that, and if they don't, they'll ask you about it. That's why learning this stuff takes time, and going to school really helps too.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 8:14 am 
Sharptooth
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or having people provide the answers to save the time of learning. isnt that what IT is all about. sharing information :-D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 8:24 am 
TravBv2.0
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rayatwork05 wrote:
or having people provide the answers to save the time of learning. isnt that what IT is all about. sharing information :-D


Well in that case, start putting in for those contracts. When you have an issue, start posting.

And IT is not about sharing information. Information Technology is exactly what it sounds like: the use of computers and software to manage information.

You've confused the IT for the internet.


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 Post subject: Re: what OS to learn for MCSE
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 10:19 am 
Java Junkie
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rayatwork05 wrote:
what software plugins/tools to make yourself an over night network admin?


No. There are no short cuts. TANSTAAFL.

You're at least a year away from being a qualified junior Network Admin who works under constant supervision. Your questions make it obvious that the only things that you know about this field are:

a) it pays decently;
b) some of the people here do it;
c) it involves PCs

Take the time to do some research (no, this absolutely does not count)

Quote:
the reason is because:
a) im going to land networking contracts. not remedial 10/hr jobs.
b) i need to know more in order to sound/sell better
c) in the event i do the work myself instead of my network guru on hand, i want to be top notch.


a) No, you aren't. You've no experience, education, or qualifications. Start at the bottom like everyone else.
b) Very true.
c) Why do you have a network guru on hand, then?

You aren't going to land any contracts until you've made a name for yourself in the industry. Be thankful .. it sounds as though you'd take the first contract offered to you and then tank it in the most awful way.


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 Post subject: Re: what OS to learn for MCSE
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 11:39 am 
Sharptooth
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thanks jip. luckily for me i have contracts already for network admin or i wouldnt have a network guru.

unfortunately the economy sucks atm, and i could use the extra cash doing the work myself seeing as how i have more time on my hands then i used to.

not everybody starts at the bottom. alot of sucesful people actually ask for insite to expedite their education. thats what im doing here.

i can learn myself all day, but i rather cut the time in half. instead of reading 2 network/certification books that are little to no help. why not read 1 well written book/guide that explains a good amount to get me on my way.

you will agree 1 good source is better then the 10 crappy sources i will discover on my own. through reference, guidance, and advice, i can improve the level of education, as well as the time required.

let me rephrase: does anyone have any good sources or recommendations for learning network admin on the fly?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:08 pm 
Java Junkie
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As has been said, you can only learn 20-30% of network administration in a book. It is a field that you learn by doing.

If you're looking for a job, the best way to choose your certs is to spend some time reviewing ads for jobs that appeal to you. Read the ads and determine what certs the employers value.

If you're looking to land contracts, you can do something similar: look for jobs whose description is similar to the contracts you're interested in and use those ads to determine the skillset and certs that are commonly associated with that position.

As for the actual texts / resources you are going to use, that will depend on the certs you want. It also depends on how you learn. Different people learn in different ways, so different training methods will apply. It is a tough question to answer for a stranger on the internet.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 4:59 am 
Sharptooth
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:-( well i know its not different then any other major.

ive read some hundred books split between psychology, computer science, and literature.

and some books are simply to the point, the end user experience simplified and explained, no nonsense. where as others are a complete waste of time. ive read 200 page dummy books that put my 1600 page neworking or hardware manuals to shame. givin enough time no google i may come across a good online source or two for feed back.

if on the job and practice is the way to go, ill load up a 2k3 server this weekend. moving on from that, what plugins do i need to learn, like acess, SQL? how do i go about playing with those? do i need vmware to act as a 3rd party connecting to my SQL server....

good practices like that are things i'd like to know. not too many sources/books/teachers at schools even, provide that kind of information.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 5:23 am 
Java Junkie
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rayatwork05 wrote:
:-( well i know its not different then any other major.

ive read some hundred books split between psychology, computer science, and literature.



It is, actually, very different from every other major. The field changes on a weekly basis and most 'best practices' are not recorded ... they are learned through trial and experience and tend to remain 'industry secrets' because many are afraid that their 'secrets' are what keep them employed.

Quote:
if on the job and practice is the way to go, ill load up a 2k3 server this weekend. moving on from that, what plugins do i need to learn, like acess, SQL? how do i go about playing with those? do i need vmware to act as a 3rd party connecting to my SQL server....

good practices like that are things i'd like to know. not too many sources/books/teachers at schools even, provide that kind of information.


Exactly. You learn them at work.

Installing an OS on your PC and learning to admin that way is like changing the oil in your car 20 times in order to learn how to be a mechanic.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 28, 2009 6:41 am 
TravBv2.0
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Ray, when you say "best practices", it makes me think you're asking about the non-technical side of being a sysadmin, which is a very large part of it. For that, I think the following titles will get you started.

http://www.amazon.com/Practice-System-N ... 702&sr=8-2

http://www.amazon.com/Management-System ... 965&sr=8-3

http://www.amazon.com/Network-Warrior-G ... 965&sr=8-6

http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Networ ... 965&sr=8-9

And plugins aren't applications. SQL and Access are databases. Exchange is an email server. AD is Active Directory (microsoft's version of LDAP).


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