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 Post subject: Life after Ubuntu
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:53 am 
Little Foot
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Location: Someplace between here and there... I think... I dont know anymore...
So I made the plunge a little over a year ago to Linux, starting with Ubuntu on my laptop, and then on my desktop. I got everything working great, and have even done 2 upgrades to the newest version when the time came. I am happy with how it runs, and am comfortable getting it working/fixed when the need arises.

But I want a new challenge... I want to learn something new... So to get myself started, what distribution would be the best way to go once I am bored with Ubuntu?

Thanks in advance.
Mobius


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 9:38 am 
Monkey Federation (Top 10)
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If you really want to 'dig into' linux, try Arch or Gentoo linux, but be prepared for a much steeper learning curve. Both of the above have robust communities that are willing to help and lots of information online for troubleshooting and how-to's.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 2:34 pm 
Million Club - 5 Plus*
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Arch or Gentoo.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 5:36 pm 
Java Junkie
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Gentoo. Do a full install from scratch and you'll learn more about linux during the process than you've learned so far. :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:02 pm 
Million Club - 5 Plus*
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I also recommend that everyone run through the Linux From Scratch book at least once. You don't have to keep the system or use it as a daily system as the book is the main part.


My only reason for going with Arch over Gentoo is the fact that Arch is a binary based distro instead of having to continually wait for rebuilds ;)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 5:52 am 
Java Junkie
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It is true that gentoo can try your patience as you wait for each stage to compile.

I can't wait to build a quadcore system and see how quickly I can build a full system, though. :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 5:20 pm 
Klamath
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I am kinda iffy on the Gentoo thing...it seems that what you 'learn' from Gentoo mostly applies to Gentoo...and not other distros. Maybe its just me. I HATE waiting 8 hours for my computer to compile 106 downloaded updates when my Sidux computer can download,install and upgrade in minutes.
Sidux is also a bit more technical than Ubuntu....you might look into downloading it...I highly recommend it.
Glenn


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 8:17 pm 
Million Club - 5 Plus*
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As for distros, to each their own.

But I do recommend trying several out. Don't limit yourself to purely Debian or Fedora respins. Try lots of different things out.

While Gentoo is a lot of gentoo specific things, it does help expose you to a lot more of the ideas of how things work. I often find the Gentoo wiki great for figuring out how to do things on Arch. Since I've used both, I know what the major differences are, and how to translate Gentoo specific things into Arch.

If you do go with Gentoo, I'd compile your own kernel. It may take a try or two to get everything 100% correct, but its a great learning experience.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:25 am 
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It's always fun to check out other distributions to see how they do things differently. It's always an eye-opening experience. I've been using Kubuntu for about the past two years.. haven't tried anything recently. I used to use slax quite a bit back in the day.

It doesn't really matter which distro you use, as long as you keep an open mind and are constantly looking for new things to learn. I've learned just as much from kubuntu as anyone could from a gentoo install, but it didn't come from using the Add/Remove software in gnome every day..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:16 pm 
TravBv2.0
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OP, I was in the same shoes as you were a about a year ago. I didn't have to move far as Debian offered a lot of what I was looking for. I'd waded in the shallow waters of Ubuntu pond, but I didn't want to jump into the Gentoo Ocean or Slackware Sea just yet. I found that Lake Debian was perfect for me. I was able to get my hands a bit dirty, and the system wasn't nearly as bloated. When I did use Ubuntu daily, it was 6.10. Now I've been using Etch and Lenny daily, in addition to XP for games of course :) I recently gave Ubuntu 8.04 a run and it was about as bloated as your average XP installation, AIM and Diner-Dash-knock-offs included. And thats on my E8400, 4Gb RAM, and a WD2500KS drive. Dapper drake ran better on my PIII system and Debian Etch ran amazing on my Athlon64 and 1Gb RAM.

I vouch for Debian Etch here, but you'd be just as fine simply playing around with different distros. I don't mean, OpenSuSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, Mint, etc. Try using systems that are more different than just Gnome and KDE and package managers. Try things like LFS, Gentoo, Arch, Slackware, CentOS, etc, etc.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 6:18 am 
Little Foot
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Just do this instead: Virtual Machine


Run one of these and try out the distros before hand :D That is what I do and how i settle on new distros. I am currently using Linux Mint 4 but will going to 8.10 when it comes out


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 8:08 am 
Java Junkie
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Why?

If you are transitioning from on OS to another, I would consider suggesting a virtual installation to ensure that you can run all the tools and apps that you need. However, transitioning from one linux distribution to another doesn't require that kind of care. So long as your partitions are well-thought out, installing a new distro over your current one (or just beside it) is a trivial exercise.

I find that people who run an OS in a virtual or emulated environment use the 'new' OS almost as infrequently as those who dual-boot to a new OS. Given the choice, most people continue to use the tools with which they are most familiar.

If you want to try something new, do yourself a favour and jump in with both feet.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 8:22 am 
SON OF A GUN
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Jipstyle wrote:
Why?

If you are transitioning from on OS to another, I would consider suggesting a virtual installation to ensure that you can run all the tools and apps that you need. However, transitioning from one linux distribution to another doesn't require that kind of care. So long as your partitions are well-thought out, installing a new distro over your current one (or just beside it) is a trivial exercise.

I find that people who run an OS in a virtual or emulated environment use the 'new' OS almost as infrequently as those who dual-boot to a new OS. Given the choice, most people continue to use the tools with which they are most familiar.

If you want to try something new, do yourself a favour and jump in with both feet.


+1

I am dual booting with Vista and Server 2008.... I would use 2k8 exclusively, but skype doesn't work on 2k8 x64 =/


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 10:54 am 
Java Junkie
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/me kicks Crash out of the Alt.OS.Abode.





;)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 11:50 am 
SON OF A GUN
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Jipstyle wrote:
/me kicks Crash out of the Alt.OS.Abode.





;)


Hey now... lol. There is no equivalent to Visual Studio for .net stuff. If it makes you feel better we have a CentOS box, running MS Silverlight :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:04 pm 
Million Club - 5 Plus*
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CrashTECH wrote:
Jipstyle wrote:
/me kicks Crash out of the Alt.OS.Abode.





;)


Hey now... lol. There is no equivalent to Visual Studio for .net stuff. If it makes you feel better we have a CentOS box, running MS Silverlight :)


There's always the possibility of using a Windows VM in seamless mode via VirtualBox


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 2:06 pm 
SON OF A GUN
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smartcat99s wrote:
There's always the possibility of using a Windows VM in seamless mode via VirtualBox
True... but then I would have to reboot for games anyway. Most likely. I don't know how well COD4 would run emulated...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 5:23 pm 
Java Junkie
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CrashTECH wrote:
Jipstyle wrote:
/me kicks Crash out of the Alt.OS.Abode.





;)


Hey now... lol. There is no equivalent to Visual Studio for .net stuff. If it makes you feel better we have a CentOS box, running MS Silverlight :)



Hehehe .. I know .. and I'm the one always preaching 'use the best tool for the job" ... so I'm a hypocrite today. ;)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 4:44 am 
SON OF A GUN
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Jipstyle wrote:
Hehehe .. I know .. and I'm the one always preaching 'use the best tool for the job" ... so I'm a hypocrite today. ;)
There is plenty of things that *nix would work great for (at least as well as what I do in Windows) but there is enough stuff that Windows does better (mostly games, and .NET) that it doesn't make sense to not have it as my main OS.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 6:02 am 
Java Junkie
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Yeah, I hear that.

Ironically, I now work for an all-windows shop who produce tools for, among other things, managing Active Directory, Exchange, etc.. .. so I now use MS products more often than not. :lol: :cry:


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