Quantcast

Maximum PC

It is currently Thu Apr 17, 2014 9:24 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Beginner Slackware 10 user with questions
PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2004 4:40 am 
Million Club
Million Club
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 9:58 pm
Posts: 2007
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada
With last night's success of my first kernel compile (2.6.9) I moreorless got my Linux box working for the first time after trying on and off for many months to familliarize myself with a non-Microsoft operating system. I slowly want to learn and get very familliar with it before I install and use it on my regular system - dual-bootable with Windows XP, ofcourse.

I chose Slackware because apparently it is the most UNIX-like distro of Linux available, which appealed to me as it's completely different as oppposed to Windows/DOS and I'm eager to learn about it.

As it stands right now, for referential purposes, here are my Linux box stats:

  • Intel Pentium Pro 200MHz processor 256K cache
  • 64MB EDO RAM
  • Western Digital 4GB hard drive
  • ATi Rage II 3D 2MB video card
  • 3COM 3C509B-TPO EISA NIC
  • ESS 1868 sound card

For the first of my many questions, I was wondering if it was possible to make a copy of my entire Linux partition to keep incase I mess up anything while messing and learning hands-on with it? The PC-equivalent term is 'ghosting', so I don't know if there is a Linux-specific term for this. I basically want to make a copy and store it on a seperate hard drive so that way I can copy it back to my Linux partition; a backup of a fresh installation.

I am also in need of more hard drive space yet can't afford any hard drives. As it is now I have a 4GB installed (256MB swap, rest main partition) and plan on shoving a 3GB in (for backup purposes). I have smaller 1.6GB and 850MB drives and was wondering if there is a way to stripe the drives, using software, I want together to make one larger virtual drive ala. Windows 2000 style?

I have a monitor which -I know- can go up to a resolution of 1024x768, yet within KDE I am always limited to 800x600. I've tried editing my 'xorg.conf' file to force it into 1024x768 but it still only goes to 800x600. Any tips or advice?

Is there a way to edit LILO to automatically boot up with a Linux kernel/version instead of always booting up to the LILO selection menu? If so how is this accomplished?

My sound card doesn't seem to work, saying it doesn't have the proper drivers installed when I go into KDE. While I'm sure I can find the driver files needed, how do I go about installing them?

I may have more questions later, as I wrote down all my questions and concerns on a piece of paper while working on my linux box, but I lost it. :shock:


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Beginner Slackware 10 user with questions
PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2004 8:57 am 
Java Junkie
Java Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 10:23 am
Posts: 24218
Location: Granite Heaven
X_ArchAngel wrote:
I am also in need of more hard drive space yet can't afford any hard drives. As it is now I have a 4GB installed (256MB swap, rest main partition) and plan on shoving a 3GB in (for backup purposes).


You *can*, but to be honest, I don't think that you should. Installing linux is one of the most thorough ways of learning how it works ... so if you bork your OS, consider it an opportunity to learn more about linux! Seriously ... this is a really good way to figure out how everything works.

Once you have the Slack install process down, try a different distro ... by comparing the differences, you'll learn even more about linux and about your PC in general.

Once you have generic linux install 'skillz', consider a different style of OS such as BeOS or one of the BSDs ... again, you'll learn more than you thought possible.

X_ArchAngel wrote:
I have smaller 1.6GB and 850MB drives and was wondering if there is a way to stripe the drives, using software, I want together to make one larger virtual drive ala. Windows 2000 style?


IF I understand your question correctly, the answer is yes ... and the solution is native to the way that linux handles drives. At the device level, your hard drives will be labelled hda, hdb, hdc, and so on. Each partition on those drives will be labelled hda1, hda2, hdb1, hdb2, etc etc. This is the (very) rough equivalent of drive letters in Windows.

However, when you mount a drive, you choose where you want to mount it. So, for the sake of explanation, let's name your drives hda (4GB), hdb (3GB), hdc (1.6GB), and hde(850MB).

hda will be your primary drive ... so you'll mount your /root and /boot partitions here. /root is the location of the 'base' (or root, obviously) of your filesystem ... the '/' in linux speak. /boot is the partition that holds your boot information (the kernel, boot information, etc. etc..)

Your directory structure will be similar to this:

/ <-- the root directory ... it holds the following:

/home <-- the home directory ... this is where user accounts are stored:

/home/root <-- this is the root (superuser) account's home directory
/home/XAngel <-- this is your user account's home directory ... your preferences, files, etc. will be stored here by default

these are all important directories, whose importance you should learn, but I'll gloss over them for now:
/etc
/bin
/sbin
/usr
/tmp

So .. by default, all of these directories will be located on your /root drive, which is the 4GB drive we've named hda.

Now, let's mount the 3GB drive we've named hdb ... you've mentioned that this is going to be a backup drive, to which you want to image your system. We can mount it anywhere on the /root drive ... to a Windows user, this sounds odd, but bear with me. :) When you mount a drive, you specify a location for it ... we'll call it backup, and we'll put it at the root of the root drive, like so:

/backup

Now, if you list the contents of the root directory, it will look something like this:

/etc
/bin
/backup
/sbin
/usr
/tmp
/home

Although hdb is a different physical drive, it appears in the same directory structure as the root drive. The file system knows that /backup exists on hdb and that the rest of the directories listed here exist on hda, but the physical location is irrelevant to the user.

You could also mount the drive further in .. say, at /home/root/backup .. it doesn't matter where you put it. The file system will handle the physical details.

Now, let's say you want to use hdc (1.6GB) as your mp3 drive .. you could mount that at /home/XAngel/mp3 ... or as /mp3 ... anywhere you like.

Does this answer your question?


X_ArchAngel wrote:
I have a monitor which -I know- can go up to a resolution of 1024x768, yet within KDE I am always limited to 800x600. I've tried editing my 'xorg.conf' file to force it into 1024x768 but it still only goes to 800x600. Any tips or advice?


We'd have to see your .conf file to help you here .. :)

X_ArchAngel wrote:
Is there a way to edit LILO to automatically boot up with a Linux kernel/version instead of always booting up to the LILO selection menu? If so how is this accomplished?


Yep. Here is an example of a Gentoo lilo.conf file ... the differences should be trivial, but if not, post yours and we can help you edit it. This config should provide three options: Gentoo, Gentoo-2.4, and Windows. I like to have a 'known-good' kernel to boot when I'm playing with a new kernel, just in case I bork the kernel compile. As you can see, this config will default to 'gentoo' after 5 seconds if no other options are selected. If you want to boot to the same kernel every time, and don't want the selection screen to appear, simply remove all references to other kernels / boot options. :D

Code:

boot=/dev/hda             # Install LILO in the MBR
prompt                    # Give the user the chance to select another section
timeout=50                # Wait 5 (five) seconds before booting the default
default=gentoo            # When the timeout has passed, boot the "gentoo"

# Only if you use framebuffer. Otherwise remove the following line:
vga=788                   # Framebuffer setting. Adjust to your own will


image=/boot/kernel-2.4.26-gentoo-r6
  label=gentoo-2.4            # Name we give to this section
  read-only               # Start with a read-only root. Do not alter!
  root=/dev/hda3          # Location of the root filesystem

image=/boot/kernel-2.6.9 # Boot using the 2.6.9 kernel instead
  label=gentoo
  read-only
  root=/dev/hda3
  append="vga=788"

# The next two lines are only if you dualboot with a Windows system.
# In this case, Windows is hosted on /dev/hda6.
other=/dev/hda6
  label=windows


X_ArchAngel wrote:
My sound card doesn't seem to work, saying it doesn't have the proper drivers installed when I go into KDE. While I'm sure I can find the driver files needed, how do I go about installing them?


That depends on your sound card. Some, such as Creative Labs' cards, have pre-compiled drivers that are proprietary ... if you let us know what kind of card you are running, we can help you set that up as well. :)

X_ArchAngel wrote:
I may have more questions later, as I wrote down all my questions and concerns on a piece of paper while working on my linux box, but I lost it. :shock:


Sorry ... no more questions for you! ;) (kidding)


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Beginner Slackware 10 user with questions
PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2004 3:16 pm 
Team Member Top 10
Team Member Top 10
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:25 am
Posts: 5179
X_ArchAngel wrote:
For the first of my many questions, I was wondering if it was possible to make a copy of my entire Linux partition to keep incase I mess up anything while messing and learning hands-on with it? The PC-equivalent term is 'ghosting', so I don't know if there is a Linux-specific term for this. I basically want to make a copy and store it on a seperate hard drive so that way I can copy it back to my Linux partition; a backup of a fresh installation.


You sure can. Acronis True Image and even Symantec Ghost support backing up Linux partitions. However, Acronis doesn't install on linux, you'll have to install it on a Windows PC, then make a 'bootable recovery disc'. Then you boot to that and you can create or restore images.
As a matter of fact, Acronis' recovery disc looks to be based upon Linux. They have some splash screen to cover up the boot process.

Quote:
I have a monitor which -I know- can go up to a resolution of 1024x768, yet within KDE I am always limited to 800x600. I've tried editing my 'xorg.conf' file to force it into 1024x768 but it still only goes to 800x600. Any tips or advice?

I'm not sure what your linux skills are, so you may have already tried this. Just in case you haven't...
After editing the Xorg.conf, I *think* you have to restart the X system (usually by pressing CTRL+ALT+Backspace), then go into the display properties and select 1024x768. It's been a while since I've used KDE, so I don't recall how to get into the display properties. I think you might be able to do that similiar to WIndows... Right click on desktop and select Properties.

Also, you should also find out the exact specs of your monitor before editing the Xorg.conf file. Sometimes if you don't have the correct Sync/Refresh rates, it won't allow certain refresh rates or Screen resolutions. :(

Hope this helps.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2004 7:22 pm 
Million Club
Million Club
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 9:58 pm
Posts: 2007
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada
Sorry for the time inbetween my responses, I've been quite busy on my end with college work.

Well I've doodled around a bit more and have actually answered most of my questions on my own. It's just I wanted to ask them here to cut down on my research times.

I've decided not to "ghost" my main drive as was mentioned in here that the practice wouldn't go to waste. I infact like the practice, while it is a bit time consuming.

The sound problem seems to have spontaneously fixed itself when I reinstalled Slack and as for the monitor resolution it isn't that big of a concern of mine now. I'll tackle it later.

Thanks again for your responses. :)


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2004 7:56 pm 
Java Junkie
Java Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 10:23 am
Posts: 24218
Location: Granite Heaven
X_ArchAngel wrote:
Thanks again for your responses. :)


Always a pleasure. :) Let us know when you need more help.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2004 10:42 am 
Coppermine
Coppermine

Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 11:07 am
Posts: 666
Location: Woodland Hills, CA
reponses look good...didnt get time to read them all the way through tho...

But, a native way to perform a backup/image of your drive is to tar (zip in the windows world) your root directory and everything under it. then dd it off (see man dd).

i've done this sort of thing at work before. we had 36 identical ssystems. instead of individually installing 36 machines with slackware, i installed it on one, tarred up the whole drive. and "dd"ed it across the network onto the machines. of course i had to manually do some things, but it was a lot faster than manually installing slack on 36 diff. machines.


Top
  Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group