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 Post subject: Good Universities or Colleges
PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 4:38 pm 
Klamath
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I am looking for good Good Universities or Colleges for fields like computer repair, web page design and editing of movies... maybe software design too. Any good ones that I should look into?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 7:15 pm 
Klamath
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oh and i dont think programming is really my thing... i was thinking more hardware. But im taking Computer Science 20 this next semester so ill decide if im in to it then.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 7:32 pm 
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What state or country do you want to attend college in? There are a lot of good universities out there, it all depends on what you want to do. Are you still in high school or out?

Computer repair is not a skilled position, I wouldn't put too much faith in that being a good job for you. Don't get me wrong, it's fun, but you won't get much more than $10-14/hour working at Geek Squad or the local PC repair place.

Web page design and movie editing is more of a trade of a tech person to be honest. Most technical people have this ability. I don't think you are going to find something that is exclusively video editing or web page design.

Are you any good at math? If not, then you don't want to go into software design. This is Computer Science.

Personally, I would get away from the basic computer hardware troubleshooting type of thought. Instead I would look into going into something maybe like ITSM (shameless plug, that is what I'm majoring in), something Business related (as long as you are good, you can make a lot of money in business) or Finance (If you do this, make sure you take a minor in Accounting or something similar).

One of the first things you need to do is come up with a list of things you are interested in (in terms of computers). Then just go scour a bunch of universities and see if they have a program that sounds interesting to you.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 8:23 pm 
Klamath
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I am currently In Grade 11. I was thinking of somthing like our techy does at the school. He manages the server and keeps all the pc's running. I'm not saying it has to be for a school any company.

What exactly do you do as a ITSM, the Wikipedia page confused me.

I currently live in Saskatchewan Canada. But we may be moving in a few months and im not sure where. (wheyerhauser mill closers).

I am not a genius at math for sure my current avrg is 57 percent which i hope to raise to 65.

Webpage design is more of an interest then anything.

As I said before im starting CompSCi 20 in a few weeks and am going to decide then if programming is my thing.

I like working with hardware and fixing problems.

something with map making would be cool i do lots of source hammer stuff but thats sorta the dream job lol.

learning to use 3ds max....

the whole computer dude at a company thing would be the goal though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 3:14 am 
TravBv2.0
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If you're admiring the School tech, and he really does work with server-side issues, then I'd look into Server Administration or Network Administration. Some positions handle both server and network duties, as well as managing the desktops. Other larger installations will have separate teams dedicated to sections like SAN administrator, Security Director, or Web Admin.

Many more generic SysAdmin/NetAdmin positions will allow you to manage the servers, network, and desktops, and the security. This is a common scenario for many SMBs (Small/Medium Business), as they can't really afford a team of techs. For this type of job, you'll get to get your hands dirty in side desktops and servers, but you're networking and server admin skills are much more important, as are your communication, documentation, and organizational skills. You'll also make decent money and wear a suit.

There aren't any particular schools that stand out in the IT world. A State school or University usually look much better to a hiring manager than a "rush" school like DeVry or ITT. Even though Popups and Daytime TV say so, you can't get your BA in 18 months.

I second what Hackman said. Just hardware isn't much of a career. It's a great job, but chances are you won't be raising a family on it's wages. I would also like to add that you should also factor in what you'd like from your job. You need to take a good look at what kinda lifestyle you want your career to provide you. I personally decided on Net/SysAdmin type jobs because I get a variety of working with my hands and deskwork, they generally get good pay and benefits, you can work without direct supervision, and it calls for good writing and organizational skills. I'm still working on the latter, :wink: . I also wanted something that would allow me to wear a suit, save only for casual Fridays.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 6:14 am 
Klamath
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ServerAdmin/NetworkAdmin sound like a great idea. I plan on going to school for a while... im not working my ass off in high school just to go to college for a year.

Ive been looking at these to places

http://www.gosiast.com/

and

http://www.usask.ca/

What kind of courses would i need to take to get that kind of a job...

Also what are some things that I can do now in high school to try and learn stuff how networks and server managment... I i do right now is monkey around with my pc. I would rather go into the course knowing at least somthing.

Oh and 10 dollars an hour would suck. I'm not saying i wanna make millions, just enough so a can afford a good pc good house and a motorcycle :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 6:25 am 
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Simply put ITSM is exactly what it says. Information Technology Service Management. In simple terms, managing the computers and the other aspects of technology within a company. Looking at possible careers of IT manager, IT director, CTO, etc.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 6:44 am 
TravBv2.0
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pepper_roni wrote:
ServerAdmin/NetworkAdmin sound like a great idea. I plan on going to school for a while... im not working my ass off in high school just to go to college for a year.

Ive been looking at these to places

http://www.gosiast.com/

and

http://www.usask.ca/

What kind of courses would i need to take to get that kind of a job...


Most schools, whether large universities or smaller community colleges, have programs specifically tailored to Network Engineering or Network Administration. If they don't have a specific program, a degree in computer science is the de facto standard for professional IT positions.

pepper_roni wrote:
Also what are some things that I can do now in high school to try and learn stuff how networks and server managment... I i do right now is monkey around with my pc. I would rather go into the course knowing at least somthing.


For now? Read. Read until your eyeballs bleed. It's entirely possible to know the ins and outs of the job better than some people who've been doing it for a year or so, if you read a shit-load of books on the topics. I'm kind of in the same boat as you. While you haven't made it to college yet, I'm 21 and can't afford to attend college until I'm 23. I decided on a career as a Server/Network Admin about 2.5 years ago. For the sake of job security and personal interest, I narrowed that down to a Linux Server/Network Administration. For me, I started by learning Linux as a user. I currently use Linux for all of my day to day stuff. I reboot into a Windows XP partition to play games. When I'm not tinkering with my own main desktop, I'm messing around with an old PII rig I hacked together with spare parts as a server for my home network. I've got 3 computers all of which are getting DNS and DHCP services from my little server (It's small and it runs Debian Linux, hence, I call it Little Debbie). I've got plans for Postfix SMTP mail and Zmanda backup server duties on the way. I read every chance I can. I eat, sleep , and breath Network Administration. I'm currently studying for my CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate) cert, and my MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional) in XP Pro (only for the sake of getting an entry level job in the IT field). Doing something similar would probably be your best bet.

If you want to get a feel for being a network administrator, you have to have a network to administrate. Start with your own. Start by having a dedicated computer do lil stuff like DHCP, basic firewall, file server, etc, etc... and move up to more complicated setups. Run web, mail, file, backup, database, proxy servers on a HA cluster (High Availability). Check your log files, rotate backups of config files... you get my point.

pepper_roni wrote:
I'm not saying i wanna make millions, just enough so a can afford a good pc good house and a motorcycle :)

Well, as a SysAdmin, you won't make millions. You can easily make a 6 figure income, but that's meaning littler and littler every day with today's inflation. Glad to hear you've got your priorities in check. Who needs a wife and kids when you've got a nice PC, your own house and a motorcycle? You forgot a home theatre while you're at it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 11:57 am 
Klamath
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hackman2007 wrote:
Simply put ITSM is exactly what it says. Information Technology Service Management. In simple terms, managing the computers and the other aspects of technology within a company. Looking at possible careers of IT manager, IT director, CTO, etc.


That sounds like something I would really like to do.

I found this course offered by Siast...

http://www.siast.sk.ca/programs_courses ... /CST.shtml

Seems to cover everything that I would need. Thoughts?

Oh and I have An old Athlon XP 2000+ machine with a gig of ram that I could use to practice server stuff and pc repair.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2009 1:38 pm 
Klamath
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anyone?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2009 4:55 pm 
Klamath
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I know this thread is dead.... but i stumped on books to read and sites to look at to learn running and building a network and linux ect.... i got the spare pc i just don't know were to start


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2009 5:29 am 
TravBv2.0
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pepper_roni wrote:
I know this thread is dead.... but i stumped on books to read and sites to look at to learn running and building a network and linux ect.... i got the spare pc i just don't know were to start


My advice? Start with these.

http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Administrat ... 009&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Networking- ... 040&sr=1-5

http://www.amazon.com/What-All-Network- ... 098&sr=1-1


http://www.amazon.com/CCNA-Certified-Ne ... 282&sr=1-1

I own titles 1, 3 & 4, but I've read part of 2 and have read other articles and books by Carla Schroder. She's good. For 4, whether you want the CCNA or not, it's the best networking book I've read. Period.


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