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 Post subject: best IT career to choose?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 8:58 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 8:39 pm
Posts: 1
Location: Ontario canada
Hey Guys Im new to this site,, This site was recommended to me, by a teacher.. I am 23 looking for a new career In the IT field..I currently work as a flooring Installer,, I have some basic knowledge of Computers ,but am willing to give it my all, to learn and succeed! Not knowing or preferring any It job over the other,,, I want some help and opions from others who know alot more than me... So what should I take In school, where is the money at? whats in hegh Demand, Not looking for the very top or the very bottom, But would prefer Somethign that is not so hard to learn, I want job Security also! Please Help would be grateful.. I hate my current job and need to get out! I dont want to go to University either and Study for 4 years so Rule any of those jobs out...College or training schools is what i have in mind


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 6:23 am 
Klamath
Klamath

Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 10:27 am
Posts: 202
Location: Canada
Hello

and welcome to the site...



if you want to fix computers get "CompTIA A+" certification get a job somewere fixing computers...like future shop, places like that...

if you want to do networking i would go for "CISCO CCNA" but that might take longer then the "CompTIA A+" but the CCNA Pays very well...

thos are the only things i can recommend because there the only ones i have some knowledge about....

but a good way to entre the IT feild would be to get the comtia A+ certification......

if you have any questions about what i recommend just ask..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:08 am 
8086
8086
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Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:44 am
Posts: 35
Location: Rhode Island
http://www.bls.gov is a great place to start. They have the Occupational Outlook Handbook found here: http://www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm
Search around and see what you like to do. Don't just pick a job that makes a ton of money if you're not going to enjoy it! The OOH will tell you salary, what you need to get the job, and a ton of other great helpful tips.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2008 1:30 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 6:59 am
Posts: 38
Location: Oklahoma
Security is starting to pay very very very well, I would suggest that, maybe start out with your A+, then your Net+, then Security+, and your set up for your MCSA-S, and after 10 or so years in the field you can get your CISSP, also get at least a 4 year degree.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 1:45 am 
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000*
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000*
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Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 11:32 pm
Posts: 2555
Location: Somewhere between compilation and linking
As you've probably realized, there are a very broad range of jobs that fall under the IT umbrella. What you need to do is take a personal inventory and figure out what you like to do and what you're good at doing. If you want to make a comfortable living and actually really understand how computers work, you'll need to get a 4 year degree.

I would highly recommend just walking into a Borders or some other bookstore, buy a coffee and snack, and park your butt for hours... days. Are you good at math? Check out the books on matlab and mathematica. Do you like solving puzzles? Smells like you might be a programmer... check out a basic algorithms book. Do you find yourself archiving everything? Hey, you're a DBA. Find a book or two on databases. Good at science? Sounds like you might make a fine CS or CE researcher. Read about AI (Norvig), read about databases, read about networking, read about programming (Effecitve anything or Thinking in anything), read about hardware (Hennesey and Patterson), read about algorithms (Tardos and Klienberg).

You just need to sit down and read, read, read, read, read, and read. Even if it doesn't look like something that you want to do... still read about it (quickly). It'll take time -- at least a week -- for you to start figuing some things out. Eventually, you'll become conversant in areas that are not really your specialty. You have to look beyond simple hardware repairs. You know how most IT people fix computers? They go... yep, there is something wrong with the hard-drive, then take the computer and send it back to Dell.

I would also HIGHLY recommend going to user group meetings. Way too many people never take advantedge of such a valuable resource. This is networking done the easy way... you'll meet people with jobs, meet recruiters and learn something new along the way. Even if you're not paticularly interested in a topic... just go. Learn.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 6:13 am 
Klamath
Klamath

Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2007 10:27 am
Posts: 202
Location: Canada
you dont really need a 4 year degree to understand how computers work.

and whats a group user thing? were i can network with other people?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:02 am 
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000*
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000*
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Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 11:32 pm
Posts: 2555
Location: Somewhere between compilation and linking
sheldon wrote:
you dont really need a 4 year degree to understand how computers work.

You're correct. It's takes closer to an 8 year degree to develop a really indepth understanding. My bad. =)

I'm obviously being sarcastic, but I'm also being serious. It depends on your ambitions. Are you trying to get a job at Fry's or Mircrosoft Research?

sheldon wrote:
and whats a group user thing? were i can network with other people?

I would start by looking for local LUGs and JUGs. From there, you may find out about other groups.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2008 11:21 am 
8086
8086

Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 6:13 am
Posts: 7
Location: Battle Creek, MI
sheldon wrote:
you dont really need a 4 year degree to understand how computers work.


If you want to be an IT professional as a career, a 4 year degree is invaluable in a countless number of ways.

Working as an IT professional in any specialization, you'll need to have knowledge and skills that go way past just 'understanding how computers work'. ;)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2008 1:23 pm 
8086
8086
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Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:44 am
Posts: 35
Location: Rhode Island
http://www.microsoft.com/communities/usergroups/default.mspx

^ more info on user groups


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