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 Post subject: CCNA question
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 3:32 pm 
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Does the CCNA certification/exams cover firewalls specifically? Also, how hard would it be to get the CCNA just by using the study guides and the demo lab simulator?(money is a tad tight for me)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 9:32 pm 
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I took semesters 1 ,2 3, 4 at a Tech scool which covered all parts of the CCNA. It didn't touch too much on the firewalls from what I remember. I never went for the certification but we did a lot of hands on work with the routers at the tech. I think it would be a lot harder . I'm looking at the current online book. I still have access from my school to it. Good thing they never change the password. I only see a section on Access Control List. I know in the past you use to be able to take these one week courses and were able to get away with an exam. However, I think they changed that. They don't rely so much on the memorization of things rather the thinking process and understanding. We had students in our class that were CCNA certified but yet couldn't configure a router.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:52 am 
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what kind of equipment would you recommed for using to study? I am on a tight budget but realize i likely will need to get some real practice. I was looking at maybe a pix501 for starters but I am not sure if that would be the best place to start or not


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 9:59 pm 
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I'm not sure about that maybe someone else can help you. I know the ones we had in class were very expensive cisco routers.

I took a computer operations job which I have to me here for 9 months. It was more of a foot in the door and I was locked in the position for 9 months. It sucks big time. The good thing is my nine months comes to an end on the 17th of this month. Then I can move anywhere in the company. I'm trying to get into the networking department we have a lot of cisco equipment here. Once I get in and get experience i'm going to go for my CCNA. The experience should help a lot plus they will pay for it. If you on a small budget maybe something like this would work for you also. Just a thought!


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 Post subject: CCNA
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:07 pm 
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CCNA is not an easy class. While I was taking it I was always reading extra materials and using Router Simulations. If you are interested i would go pick up a book and start reading it and get a Sim and start messing around with it. You could probably teach your self the stuff but you have to be very motivated. The first semesters are pretty easy, when you have to start learning subneting and what not it can easily get confusing.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 1:27 pm 
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I am also taking CCNA Phases 1&2 this semester at my college. It doesn't deal with Firewalls too much, like bowdwin said. Phases 1&2 just focus mostly on networking basics, then CCNA 3&4 I think get into the more detailed Cisco and router config etc. I may be wrong though. I was told that the certs are written to really trick you into answering incorrectly if you just memorized crap. For example

A question would be something like where is the MAC address placed in the header of a packet being sent to a server?

This question is a trick in that there is no MAC address in the header yet because it does not get added to the header until the data reaches the Physical layer where it then becomes a Frame. A packet lies on the Transport layer, where a frame is on the Physical layer.

I have been told its questions like this on the exam that you really have to not only be careful but have a solid understanding of the course material. If I am incorrect here please correct me but this is pretty much from the book.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 9:51 am 
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I am studying for my CCNA. Here as a great place to start for advice..
http://www.thebryantadvantage.com/Tutorials.htm

I bought a CCNA kit from Ebay.com.. it cost me ~$535.00 for 3ea 2600 routers and 2ea 1900 switches all running IOS.
When done, I can keep it for my CCNP or sell it to get your money back.
I think you really need the real routers to study. Do you think you could learn about computers using a simulator? I just used my tax refund to pay for the routers. I think it is a good envestment in ones self.
You need to know what is going on because you need like a 849 or something to pass vs Microsoft you can pass with just a 700. I think the heavy firewall stuff would be more in the CCNP tests.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:13 am 
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another question. How much would it hurt not having a live ISDN/frame relay/T1 to work off of?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:20 am 
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LOL. That is a very good woop butt question. One I have been looking at also. You do not need live nor really the ISDN simulator. The ISDN sims I have been looking for are so expensive (`$350 for are pc card to fake it) but not something you need to worry about setting up for the CCNA test. I am guessing it is such a small part in CCNA , studying is good enough. If you go to the CCNP, it may be more worth it, but no way for the CCNA and the poor peoples buget.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:06 am 
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I hold a CCNA & CCNP.

The CCNA is pretty easy, a good portion of the test centers on the OSI model and the functions of the 7 layers (like, "Layer 2 is responsible for _______" (multiple choice)), configuration operations, address Classes (A,B,C,D,E) IP addressing and subnet masking. Also, there may be some design questions like, "A campus network would be considered a _______" (multiple choice).

There may be some ACL (Access Control List) references, but I think that the most you would need to know would be IP standard (1-99) and IP extended (100-199) ACLs, which make up the vast majority of firewall configuring you'd do. Those are pretty easy and follow a simple format;


Standard
Router(config)# access-list <1-99> <permit/deny> (source.address) (source.mask)

Extended
Router(config)# access-list <100-199> <permit/deny> <udp/tcp> (source.address) (source.mask) (destination.address) (desitination.mask) eq <port.number (1-65535)>

Just remember that the source/destination mask is the inverse, so that if you want to block all but the 4th octet (/24), then you use 0.0.0.255 instead of the intuitive 255.255.255.0 that you use when addressing.

I don't remember any questions regarding DEC, AppleTalk, ISDN or such things as telephony. Mostly basics, IP & ethernet-centric.

I would recommend Introduction to Cisco Router Configuration as the only book you really need. You could also do some reading at cisco.com, they have a lot of documentation, although I don't find it well organized (lots of redundancy and hard to find specifics).

I always had access to all types of routers and switches from work, so I don't know what to recommend to those without access to such resources, but you might do some googling for Cisco IOS configs to get an idea of how standard systems are setup and configured. There are emulators and sims that you could use, but I haven't used any to make any recommendations.

Post Script: Regarding the CCNP; there is no way in hell (IMHO) that you can successfully pass the CCNP without a set of routers and manageable switches with hosts to work with. For me, it was most beneficial that I had to use them everyday for work on a MAN, so I didn't have a choice but to learn/know how to do stuff. It basically needs to become second nature to you to do just about anything you'd see in a large network with a lot of customers making various requests for services.


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