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 Post subject: Historical Computer Trivia
PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 10:47 pm 
King of All Voodoo2 Cards
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When and Why did Intel start producing chipsets? and who was the company being bitchy with licensing that pushed Intel into the chipset business?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 7:18 am 
Northwood
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IIRC, it was IBM...sometime in the early 70's(72 or 73?)


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 10:40 am 
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I'm going to post the answer later tonight, maybe even offer a free coffee to the winner or something.

JAFAH, you're waaaay off on the timeline and you've got the wrong company.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 2:26 pm 
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All I could find is that it was the 420TX(Saturn), which Intel released in may of 1990. I'm going to guess it was ALI that wouldn't liscence their chipset to Intel, unless Intel paid a bunch of money for it.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 3:18 pm 
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You're getting warming, it was the 420 series that Intel first released in April 1989 for the 486 lineup.

I'm surprised no one has figured out which company was being all retarded over sharing their chipsets.

I'll give you one more hint, I usually trash this company whenever I get the chance, and no, it's not Powercolor.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 4:47 pm 
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Flytrap7 wrote:
I'm going to post the answer later tonight, maybe even offer a free coffee to the winner or something.

JAFAH, you're waaaay off on the timeline and you've got the wrong company.


...and I need glasses too, I read chip, not chipset :oops:

I thought the i350DT was Intels first chipset?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 6:40 pm 
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Never heard of it, but very unlikely because Intel only uses the following prefixes on all their chipsets:

420xx series for the P4 (486)
430xx series for the P5 (Pentium)
440xx series for the P6 (Pentium Pro/II/III)
8xx series for the P6/P7 (Pentium II/III/IV)
9xx series for the P7 (Pentium IV) with PCIe

There's a couple of other ones for their server lineup:

450xx series for the P6 server (Pentium Pro, PII/PIII Xeon)
E72xx series for the Xeon Workstation class
E75xx series for the Xeon Server class
460xx series for the Itanium Processor
E88xx series for the Itanium II Processor


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 9:07 pm 
Northwood
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http://www.motherboards.org/mobot/chips ... tel/350DT/

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/d ... 000001.htm


Weird thing is it's not listed on Intel's museum.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 2:53 pm 
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JAFAH5150 wrote:
http://www.motherboards.org/mobot/chipsets_d/Intel/350DT/

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/d ... 000001.htm


Weird thing is it's not listed on Intel's museum.


Probably because no one seems to know the actual specifications for it.

Your first link says the chipset is socket 3 (3.3v 486), that would put it's introduction to somewhere around 1992, 3 years after Intel's first chipset.

The link on Dell's site states that it's a Pentium chipset, probably socket 4, which would push it's introduction to 1993.

There seems to be no substantial information to back either site's claims though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 5:54 pm 
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It was VIA!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 5:57 pm 
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it was AMD! :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:45 pm 
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Found an end of service archive:
http://www.Intel.com/design/archives/periphrl/

About 3/4 the way down 82350 EISA(1989):
http://www.quepublishing.com/articles/a ... 01763&rl=1

There's references to it here(1990/1992):
http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5371880.html
==============

What's the answer to "which company was being all retarded over sharing their chipsets"?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 7:29 pm 
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Belkin?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 8:59 pm 
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Hmm prior to the Triton series there really wasnt a dominant player in the 486 market.
UMC, SiS and OPTi were pretty much the only players at that time.

But Im a little bit confused, at the time I recalled the IAL developed the PCI bus and that lead to the developement of the Triton. Since they had a leg up from a development standpoint, there was no reason, economically, for Intel to license their bus to others.

The only licensing dustup I remember from that time frame was with AMD, but that wasnt over chipsets.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:12 pm 
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I stand corrected, I had forgotten about the 420x series


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:40 pm 
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I suppose you've all waited long enough, I was suppose to post this last night anyway:


We all have to thank Compaq ("ShitPaq") for forcing Intel into the chipset making business in the first place.

What started it all was the introduction of the EISA bus, which was designed by Compaq in 1989. At that time, it had shared the bus with other manufacturers in an attempt to make it a market standard. However, ShitPaq refused to share its EISA bus chipset- a set of custom chips necessary to implement this bus on a motherboard.

Enter Intel, who decided to fill the gap for the rest of the PC manufacturers wanting to build EISA motherboards. As it's obvious today, the EISA bus failed to become a market success except for a short term niche server business, but at this point Intel had a taste of the chipset business.....

Let's turn back the clock a few years shall we?

With the introduction of the 286 and 386 processors Intel became impatient with how long it took the chipset companies to create chipsets around it's new processors. For example, it took two years after the introduction of the 286 before the first 286 based motherboards showed up on the market. Likewise it took just about a year after it's release for the 386 boards to hit the market.

This was a problem for Intel because they couldn't sell their chips in volume until the other manufacturers could make the boards to support them. So Intel began developing the chipsets in parallel with their new processor designs so that when the chips were introduced, the motherboard manufacturers were ready to begin making the boards.

Intel tested this new business model by releasing the 80420 series of chipsets along with it's new 486 processors in April 1989.

After this new business model proved sucessful, Intel then figured they could eliminatd the wait for motherboards and produce them as well, so they could have the boards ready with the introduction of their new processors. This happened in 1993 when Intel released the first Pentium processor along with the 80430LX chipset and a fully finished motherboard to go with it. Since then, consumers have been able to purchase ready made systems on the same day a processor is released.



I suppose ShitPaq did have it's moments.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:44 pm 
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markmark69 wrote:
Hmm prior to the Triton series there really wasnt a dominant player in the 486 market.


The Triton series was huge.

They had some marketing campaign going at that time, at the computer flea markets I used to go to I remember everyone advertising the Triton I and Triton II series (I'd mention the Triton III, but since it was such a piece of shit, I figured I'd avoid it).

I built my first dualie back then using the Intel 80430HX ("Triton II") chipset. I've still got it under my desk, and if I can find a goddamn Marl ATX backplate I might put it back into service.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 7:34 am 
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Yep! I remeber that marketing splash.
In my lab we still have a 486 running Win 3.11 (There is proprietary software that runs a massive DAS system and the company went out of business years ago, so we are stuck with it) Its been running for 17 yrs non-stop. It even still has the original HD in it.....Its a Gateway
:shock:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 7:37 am 
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Flytrap7 wrote:
We all have to thank Compaq ("ShitPaq") for forcing Intel into the chipset making business in the first place.


I like to consider it a Compact but that works too :P


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