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 Post subject: PSU freq.
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 1:01 pm 
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I'm trying to make a small modification to my case (yes, involving lights) and I want to run it off the PSU. But frequency is a factor. Anyone know the output frequencies of the various plugs? I've tried searches with no results. Everything says 50-60 Hz input, but I need the output.


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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 1:59 pm 
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The PSU's output is DC, iirc, therefore it shouldn't have a frequency.

unless I'm totally mis undertanding something, lol :-)


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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 2:28 pm 
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denyasis wrote:
The PSU's output is DC, iirc, therefore it shouldn't have a frequency.

unless I'm totally mis undertanding something, lol :-)


Yes, that's correct.

What type of lights are you installing? Cold cathodes? LEDs? Both of those can easily be run off your PSU, but if you're installing some type of light that requires AC, that might be a little more difficult.


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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 12:49 pm 
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Actually, I was going to install a binary clock which takes its time and power from an AC adapter but was hoping to use the PSU.


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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 2:43 pm 
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Drewcifer wrote:
Actually, I was going to install a binary clock which takes its time and power from an AC adapter but was hoping to use the PSU.


An AC adapter as in a transformer? You know, the boxy-type thing connected to the power cord?

If so, take a look at the adapter and see what the output voltage is. Input should be something like 120v AC @ 60Hz. If the output voltage of the transformer is 5V or 12V DC, it will be a cinch to run the clock off your PSU.


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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 5:50 pm 
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a lot of clock projects depend on 60 Hz AC as its timer source (they count the cycles), even if its at 6 volts.

if you know what youre doing and are comfortable opening power supplies you can grab 120v AC from the switched mains in the PSU, run an appropriate power cable (with a standard plug) to a wall wart in the case.

better (from a modders point of view) would be to grab power as above and feed it to a standard transformer with the appropriate voltage mounted right in the case and feed the clock directly from its output. appropriate fusing, as close to the power input point as possible, is a must!

this of course exposes you and the computer to 120v AC at the full amperage of the wall outlet if something goes wrong. lots of heat shrink tubing, proper connectors, good soldering skills, sharp edge protection (preventing cable chaffing) and safe cable routing skills are needed.

STANDARD WARNING: DO NOT try it if you dont know what youre doing. 120VAC will kill you (obviously) not to mention improper wiring is a fire hazard etc


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