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 Post subject: Help spray painting!
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 6:23 am 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu Dec 25, 2008 1:44 pm
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I'm spraypainting the interior of a CM HAF 932, and was just wondering if there were things i should do to not f**k it up.

thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:50 pm 
Coppermine
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 7:06 pm
Posts: 610
Location: San Antonio
I've sprayed a number of computer cases inside and outside. Hopefully your case is empty as that is the first step. I usually dis-assemble the case removing the front, sides and other panels that may come off. Be sure and remove all components, power supply, LED indicators and push buttons unless you are an expert at masking things off.

It appears your case has a number of "cages" for the hard drives and CD ROMS. If those cages unscrew, I'd remove them too. Blow out any dust and if possible, completely wipe the parts with alcohol to remove any oils or silicones. Dry completely. Both these first steps allow for a much easier and complete application of paints.

The next trick is to very carefully mask off what you do not want painted. I use a good brand of masking tape and newspaper. Cheap masking tape can pull up while you are painting. Old tape can leave sticky residue. Once everything is laid out with the surfaces you want painted prepared, apply a light misting coat first.

Then, if it looks as if the paint is where you want it, apply several more thin layers to get complete coverage. Allow to dry between coats as specified with the paint you are using.

Don't spray on a very humid or cold day. I use a large cardboard box as a painting surface. That way you can either paint in out in the yard for good ventilation and sun or move the painted parts into the sun after you finish. If you have bugs and tree leaves to worry about, paint in the garage and move the panels outside after they "skin" over to completely dry.

The sun acts as a poor man's oven and bakes the paint on making it resistant to scratching when installing and assembling everything back together. The biggest trick is to NOT RUSH.

Sraying on heavy layers can create runs, dry wrinkled, dry with different finishes and so on. Improper cleaning can lead to "fish eye", peeling paint or paint that scratches very easily when assembling things.

Be sure and consider different finishes beyond the ususal flat or gloss finish. I like to use a hammered finish, wrinkle finish or sandstone finish just to be different. I had one old computer for sale on Craig's List where the guy wanted to buy just the case because of the color and hammered finish.

Have Fun!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 10:56 am 
Boy in Black
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Great points there OldWizKid. I can only add some minor tips after that!

I'd really recommend to not move the painted parts. I'd get the parts in the area and do both paint and dry in the same spot. Having the paint, part, and air at the same temp is a big deal IMO. The largest flaw from having several different temps is the dreaded Orange Peel. The bottom dries faster or slower than the top layer. A variation of orange peel also occurs from over application.

And if anything else, you risk screwing up by moving the wet parts around. I agree with the sun being our curing oven, but only after the paint is set, which is about 45minutes. Once it's set, I think it's fine to move it around, peel the masking, start to cure it, and do whatever.

I peel my masking off early on some shoots. If you pull it off after it's set, you can have rough edges. That's fine if you color block (sand) before a clearcoat or something like that. But if you don't plan on that, peeling the mask early has it reform a smoother edge by the paint slumping or relaxing. It's a bigger deal if you're making a design or mating two colors. Not a big deal if you're just coating a big area and no edges exist.

I love the idea to gut the cases as much as possible. It's just easier to work with, and you can get details you usually can't in an assembled case.
Image
Nooks and crannies are covered. If you paint assembled, these gaps can be covered and later crack. Or worse, it's a removable part you later want to remove.

I'd tape off some areas that could become problematic in time. All those little standoff holes should be left bare. If you can find some little round stickers, they work perfectly for masking these spots. If not, just tape 'em up. When the board's on, you won't see them. Might just mask off the entire square area where the board goes. No need to waste paint when you won't see it.

I'd also go ahead and mask off the rear PCI slot's top. Fit up a pci blank or device to see where you need to mask.
Image
I don't paint this area because it's not electronically sound, but really isn't an issue overall. Mainly, it's because you change parts and it'll get scratched up or worse...begin to chip. I'd also skip doing the inside where the PSU mounts for the same reasons.


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