Quantcast

Maximum PC

It is currently Wed Aug 27, 2014 3:32 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Cutting The Case
PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 6:50 am 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 6:12 am
Posts: 21
Hey, I have a NZXT Hush Silent Gaming Case, and want to put in a clear side window. The only probleme is I do not know what I could use to cut the metal. Does anyone know what I can use?


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 8:43 am 
Klamath
Klamath

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 11:39 am
Posts: 219
If it's not an extremely complex design, a demel is probably the easiest and cheapest way. Just do a Google search for dremel and computer case. Also, I think modshop.net might have a tutorial.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cutting The Case
PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:58 am 
Team Member Top 50
Team Member Top 50
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 16, 2008 1:05 am
Posts: 2437
Location: Sold my soul to Satchboy for an avatar
Mogul20478 wrote:
Hey, I have a NZXT Hush Silent Gaming Case, and want to put in a clear side window. The only probleme is I do not know what I could use to cut the metal. Does anyone know what I can use?
Jigsaw, with a metal cutting blade I won't use anything finer than 12-20 tpi, or you'll be at it all day.

You're talking about cutting somewhere in the range of FOUR feet (if you took the corners out and stretched it out straight). I don't know about you, but I wouldn't want to use a dremel to cut across the width of a sheet of plywood?

A few tips from personal experience:
Do your markings on, and your cutting from the inside.
Measure at least a few times before you cut (I'm sure you've heard that one a few times).
Don't drill your starter hole right on the cutting line. Drill inside of the hole, the cut your way over to the line.
If you want tighter corners than the saw blade will cut, sawcut the straights and dremel (or a small grinder in a drill) the corners.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 9:21 pm 
8086
8086
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2007 4:58 pm
Posts: 32
Well, if you do decide to use a dremmel, go with a fiberglass reinforced disc, and make sure you use a dust mask. Otherwise your dinner will taste like whatever color paint case is made out of :shock: . A $40 painter's respirator half mask is your best choice, charcoal filtered, etc.

It might be worth looking and seeing if the manufactorer actually sells an interchangeable panel that has one cut already. It might also be worth seeing if you should fabricate the entire panel -- if you make a mistake, you still have the original, and you won't feel angry about it.

You might even have a machine shop nearby that does water-cutting, maybe they will entertain the idea and do it cheap. I think the factories probably use hydraulic presses that actually press out such openings.

:idea: If you are worried about straight edges, you can probably cheat and use some of those sliding report covers painted black or something. :twisted:


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: re: case cutting
PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:46 am 
Team Member Top 500
Team Member Top 500

Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2007 11:32 am
Posts: 414
Location: FL
Hey Mon...

I just cut some openings in my friend case, using dremmel. Came out fairly nice.

I started with the std. red cutting wheel, but like noted before it would have taken 20+ disks. Then I tried the reinforced disk, but it too was wasted quickly. I finally tried the metal cutting disk and that's the ticket. got like 12-18 in.'s of cut from one. I found buying the big kit of accessory. items made the disks rather cheap, other wise it's like 15-20 bucks for a pack of 10.

cutout panel

Takes some practice, and I found it was easy to grind/sand the edge straight which helps the finish look, so u don't have to cut to close and go over the line. It's hard to get a long straight cut in the middle(tool gets in the way). Note there is an attachment for a circular saw setup. Looks pretty cool, I think one could set up a table saw layout and use.

Otherwise one could use some type of trim molding.

As you can see I put screen in place instead of a window, talk about air flow! This is going to be a std. mod for me(i.e. screen).


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 6:48 am 
Million Club - 5 Plus
Million Club - 5 Plus
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2006 6:23 am
Posts: 2628
Location: Folding as BlackSun59
Whatever you do, do your cutting outdoors! I used a Dremel to cut three 80mm holes in a steel case indoors in a humid July heat wave, and for at least a week afterwards, the room smelled like a machine shop. The grinding wheel dust and vaporized steel stinks like hell and gets all over the place.

Safety glasses are a must when the wheels shatter... and believe me, they will. I busted three of 'em.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 8:15 am 
Little Foot
Little Foot
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2004 8:28 am
Posts: 102
Location: Someplace between here and there... I think... I dont know anymore...
I would use a jigsaw for the long cuts, then use a Dremel with a grinding wheel to smooth it out. For more detailed cuts, use the Dremel.

When you use the Dremel, steady hands and patience is very important. If you find yourself getting to anxious, take a break for a few minutes. It will take time away from the project, but if you are calm, it will come out a whole lot better.

Also, a metal file at the end would be a good idea to make sure everything comes out smooth on the straight cuts.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 11:53 am 
Boy in Black
Boy in Black
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 1:40 pm
Posts: 24339
Location: South of heaven
Great advice Mobius (Strip?). A jig saw is great for the long cuts where the Dremel with a cutting wheel can (will) end up pretty wavy. The jigsaw allows the use of a jig, where a straightedge can be used during the cut and need no final trimming up. The Dremel, well, it's free hand.

I'll use a hole saw on all four corners, and then layout the straight cuts for the jigsaw. The straight cuts meet the apex of the circle cutouts. The jig helps by just having a straight line to use and there's no eye-hand coordination needed really. Line up the blade, set one end of the jig (wood), clamp that end, and then measure the fixed end and duplicate it on the free end, clamp...cut away. With the four corners already cut out, this comes out to be a nice rounded window with really no effort.

Dress up of this hole needs done though. That file mobius talks of should be brought out and used. The cut will have sharp edges, and you just chamfer the cuts...slight brushing with a fine file. Using the file along the flat edge of the cut also backs it as being flat and straight. Metal is exposed, so dust it with paint...black is common, and you just dust from the backside.

THEN I cut the window. I make it 3/8" larger than the hole I cut. It doesn't have to be rounded or anything. It's just going to be epoxied to the inside of the panel you just cut.

This doesn't work if you want to use window molding or anything, but is the simple method to get a window done and in your case.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:25 am 
Little Foot
Little Foot

Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:00 am
Posts: 102
Depends on what you got tool-wise. I personally first rough-cut it with an angle grinder, and then clean up the edge with a pneumatic die ginder. Dremel, works, but it's a small-work tool. Long cuts in steel aren't its forte.[/url]


Top
  Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group