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 Post subject: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2012 9:58 pm 
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Working on a idea where I install into my new case a backup power supply so if say you kick out the plug the system can still run, much like laptops do when unplugged

Found this http://www.bixnet.com/unpowbat.html and they are even designed in a way you can daisly chain them together and what i was thinking was to daisy 3 of them together and tie it together with the PSU plug so you only need one plug but when plugged in it charges the battery and powers the PSU. While in theory i could just have the PSU and Battery pack use a surge protector strip if you unplug the Surge protector it's going to die, i need to find some way to route the PSU power through the battery and then charge the battery from the plug but i'm not sure just how to pull that off. Any Ideas?


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 9:20 pm 
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nekollx wrote:
Working on a idea where I install into my new case a backup power supply so if say you kick out the plug the system can still run, much like laptops do when unplugged

Found this http://www.bixnet.com/unpowbat.html and they are even designed in a way you can daisly chain them together and what i was thinking was to daisy 3 of them together and tie it together with the PSU plug so you only need one plug but when plugged in it charges the battery and powers the PSU. While in theory i could just have the PSU and Battery pack use a surge protector strip if you unplug the Surge protector it's going to die, i need to find some way to route the PSU power through the battery and then charge the battery from the plug but i'm not sure just how to pull that off. Any Ideas?

Charging the battery pack isn't the hard part (you could hook the 12V rail from the power supply to the battery pack), powering your system from the battery pack is. To power the system from the battery, you'd either have to convert the battery output to 120 V AC; or convert the output to 5V, 3.3V, etc. and hook them up to each rail of the power supply output.

I'd suggest using dual power supplies, an external backup power supply, and/or just be careful to not unplug your system.


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 10:56 pm 
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yeah and there has to be some way to convert it, but i'm a novice for the matters of a ac/dc converters


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 7:16 am 
Smithfield
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I don't see why you couldn't buy a UPS...


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 9:32 am 
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no particular reason besides with the batteries i can spread them out different inside the case thus reducing the huge foot print while a UPS would need to find a rather large space inside the case to house it which limits placement.


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 12:00 pm 
Smithfield
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Like it was mentioned before, the problem is that the Li-Ion battery pack would produce 12V/19V, and while the 12V is fine, you'll need to branch it out to 5V and 3.3V if you want to do a direct plug into the computer. So unless you know how to design step down transformers, this is obviously a terrible route (and I'm not aware of any voltage regulator that can accept that high of a voltage).

To get around this though, you'd need an inverter. However, a basic 140W inverter is about as big as the original XBox 360's power brick. Not to mention I can't see a decent way to connect the computer to the main line unless you run a series of cables inside of the computer.

Again, just get a UPS. You get your power strip, battery, and as a bonus, power conditioning. Not to mention, what are you going to do about your monitors? A computer's kind of useless without human readable outputs...


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 12:36 pm 
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I'm planning to run all cables inside the case, i'm making a all in one unit so i really am trying to keep it to one extera wall outlet with a way that if you un plug it, say to move it around the room you won't loose the funcutionality of the machine or need to shut down and reboot


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 1:08 pm 
Smithfield
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What's wrong with hibernating? And do you even have enough scenarios where power loss is an issue to justify something on the order at least $300 worth of stuff? And I'm going to assume when you say "unplug", you want to route the batteries to the motherboard. Which I ask again, do you even have the electrical expertise to safely and cleanly downstep 12V into 5V, 3V, (I missed these) -5V and 12V? Are you even completely familiar with the ATX specification to the point where the motherboard won't know the difference?

Electricity isn't just something the average joe can play around with.


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 5:14 pm 
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considering the server is designed to be set up in a RV there is very good chance it will be off the grid for some times, and yes i'm well versed enough en electronics to down step if can find the right way to inveret Ac to DC i have all the other details worked out


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 9:16 pm 
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http://www.digikey.com/

Good luck.


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 9:27 pm 
Smithfield
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mag wrote:


That's all I can say too. Though honestly it would probably better just to get a high performance inverter and tap into the RV's battery...


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 Post subject: Re: backup power for a desktop unit
PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 10:03 pm 
8086
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Joined: Fri Jul 05, 2013 7:40 pm
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back-up ups nowadays are smaller and can sure fit inside the cpu. and is really designed for computers. batteries i guess is not safe.


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