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 Post subject: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:53 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 12:59 pm
Posts: 21
First my headphones stopped working. After troubleshooting didn't fix this I restored my system to the earliest date available, but this didn't help. I discovered that my CD's and DVD's wouldn't auto play. None of my CyberLink optical drive programs launch or open. Sometimes when I try watching a video clip on the internet it stops and I get either "Skype Click to Call has crashed," even though I didn't have Skype active, or "Shockwave crashed." When I opened a browser a JavaScript window opened saying that Microsoft Antivirus 2013 detected a critical process and has to do a scan. Because there's no Microsoft Antivirus I didn't click the "OK" button. Since that Javascript message I've updated my Kaspersky PURE 2.0 and ran full system scan, but nothing was found. Also, Kaspersky's control panel erroneously stated my last scan had been 15,000+ days ago. I downloaded Malwarebytes and SuperAntiSpyware and ran full system scans in Safe Mode, but only a few tracking cookies were found. My PC still works, but I can't play games without headphones and I can't play CD's or DVD's. I know not to open attachments from unknown sources, and I won't open attachments from known sources if there's no subject or greeting. And I rarely click on banner ads. I suspect I've been too cavalier with downloading freeware I thought I could use. Now I'm thinking freeware could be part of PC STD's.

What I need, what we all need, is a PC equivalent of the Ten Commandments for protection. I welcome such a DO's and DON'T DO's list. The internet is wonderful but hazardous. :( Thank you.

Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OS
Phenom II 965 quad core CPU 3.6GHz
Asus Crosshair IV Formula ROG motherboard
16GB of OCZ Reaper 1333 DDR 3 system RAM
Dual Radeon HD 7970 graphics cards in Crossfire
Sound Blaster Recon3D Fatal1ty Champion sound card
LG Blu-ray rewriter drive
PC Power & Cooling 950W PSU
Seagate SATA III 2TB HDD (my C, primary drive)
Western Digital SATA II 2TB HDD (my D drive)


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2013 5:20 pm 
Smithfield
Smithfield

Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 7:37 pm
Posts: 5392
It really boils down to:

  • Don't open anything unless you've verified what it is first
  • Don't enter any sensitive information until you've confirmed that 1. you're on an HTTPS connection and 2. The website is legitimate
  • Keep an up to date anti-malware program
  • Use a really hard to guess password of at least 8 characters that have a letter (bot upper and lower case), number, and special character.

Keep in mind however: Any problem that the computer runs into is probably your fault.


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2013 5:54 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 12:59 pm
Posts: 21
I appreciate your suggestions and I agree I did something that caused my corruptions. I will resist freeware as well. I downloaded a freeware I thought was neat and very consciously unchecked boxes for installing its toolbar and search, but once I downloaded it its toolbar and search appeared at the top of every browser I use. It was worse than annoying. It was fat enough to obscure the Search pane of Facebook. I used Revo Uninstaller Pro to rid the toolbar and search, but that didn't work. Then I uninstalled the program too, but its toolbar and search remained. I wrote to the program's creator for help and was ignored. After a long time and a lot of effort the pesty toolbar and search are gone. Unfortunately, the program's tile is still present in all apps of my Windows 8 Pro UI and I can't get rid of it. Unfortunately, I'm like a kid who falls for free candy. I'm not saying that this program has led to my problems, but I shouldn't assume that freeware that promises to do good things is good. If I have to reinstall Win 8 and restore my PC I'll keep it lean. Thank you for your reply.


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 5:19 am 
8086
8086

Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2012 6:25 pm
Posts: 25
Quote:
Fortunately, archeologists have recently unearthed two stone tablets from a garage near Cupertino, California that can help deliver us from such evils. We present their guidelines here, along with interpretations from our brothers and sisters in the PC security choir.

I. Remember thy antivirus software and keep it updated.
It's not enough to have the software installed (if you don't have an antivirus package, stop reading right now and get one); you also need to keep up with new viruses as they emerge. "Your antivirus software is only as good as your latest virus definitions set," says Kelly Martin, senior product manager for Symantec's Norton AntiVirus. Programs like Symantec's Norton AntiVirus ($50) and Network Associates' McAfee VirusScan ($35 to $60) can automatically update their virus signature databases, but it costs an additional $20 to $35 for ongoing annual subscriptions.

II. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's attachments.
You get a message you think is from a friend with what looks like a cool file attached, so you click on it. Next thing you know, you're Typhoid Mary, spewing out infected e-mails to everyone in your address book. That's how the Sobig.F worm spread--and it happened so quickly that millions of copies got out before the antivirus companies could update their databases.

"Never trust an e-mail 'from' address," adds Chris Wysopal, director of research for security consultants @Stake. "And never open an attachment without verifying it was sent by a trusted person, and they meant to send it to you."

III. Avoideth bogus file downloads.
Be wary of any Web site that requires you to download software to view a page, unless it's something familiar like a Flash plug-in or Acrobat Reader. The file may contain a virus, a Trojan horse, or some auto-dialer that calls pay-per-minute numbers via your modem and racks up huge charges.

"Do not install software via the Web unless you are absolutely sure what it is and that you trust the company you are downloading it from," warns @Stake's Wysopal.

IV. Smite spyware and pop-ups.
Like Trojan horse programs, spyware secretly installs itself when you download software like file-swapping applications; it tracks your movements online and delivers ads based on where you surf. Pop-up ads can also exploit security flaws in Internet Explorer, like the recent Qhost Trojan that hijacked users' browsers after they viewed an ad on the Fortune City Web site. Fortunately, there are tools that can protect you: For example, Ad-aware (free) blocks spyware and StopZilla ($30) takes care of pop-up ads. Some antivirus software and security suites also stop spyware and pop-ups in their tracks.

V. Thou shalt foil spammers.
Unsolicited commercial e-mail is more than just a nuisance; it's also a major source of virus infections. In fact, some versions of Sobig are designed to turn infected PCs into zombie machines that can be used to send spam. A good filter like Symantec's Norton AntiSpam 2004 ($40), Network Associates' McAfee SpamKiller 5 ($40 to $50), or Sunbelt Software's IHateSpam ($20) help trap the nasties your antivirus software might miss.

VI. Keep thy operating system patched.
E-mail-borne worms and other scourges like to exploit security holes in your software--namely Windows and other Microsoft programs. These days Microsoft issues so many critical updates to fix these flaws that many users ignore them. Don't. Last January, the Slammer worm exploited a vulnerability that Microsoft had fixed more than six months before. But thousands of infected computers--including some at Microsoft--didn't have the patch installed. Run the Windows Update program once a week and whenever Microsoft issues a warning.

"Until we see automated patch management software, users will simply have to stay up to date," says Thor Larholm, senior security researcher at PivX Solutions.

VII. Maketh a rescue disk and keep it handy.
When things go bad, a boot or rescue disk is your first step to recovery. At minimum, you'll want to put the basic elements of your operating system on a floppy disk or Zip media, so you can bypass the hard disk at start-up. To find out how, read "Hardware Tips: Create Your Own Emergency Boot Disk." A better idea: Use your antivirus program to create a rescue disk you can use when your system gets infected. Label it with a date and store it near your system where you won't lose it.

VIII. Be not taken in by false claims.
There are more hoaxers than hackers on the Internet, and more bogus "e-mail virus alerts" than actual viruses. Even real virus threats are typically blown out of proportion by the media. A phony warning could cause you to delete harmless files and then forward the message to others, clogging e-mail servers and causing virus-like damage in the process. When you get one of these e-mails (or see yet another breathless news story), check it out first. Type the name of the alleged virus into a search engine to see if any of the major security vendors have issued an alert, and visit the virus hoax pages at F-Secure and Hoaxbusters.

IX. Honor thy firewall.
A firewall is like a bouncer for your computer--it checks every ID at the door and won't let anything in or out until you give the thumbs up. So a hacker can't access personal information on your hard drive, and a Trojan horse keystroke logger (a stealth program that monitors the characters you type) can't steal your passwords and transmit them over the Net. Symantec and Network Associates both offer personal firewall packages for $35 to $50, while Zone Labs offers a no-frills version of its ZoneAlarm software firewall for free. But a better deal is an Internet security suite that combines antivirus, firewall, ad blockers, spam fighting, and other useful apps; most cost between $60 to $80. For a review of suites from Symantec and Network Associates, read "Extra-Suite Virus and Spam Protection."

X. Maketh backups and keep them holy.
Simply put: Back up your data files at least weekly (daily if you're running a business). Even if you fall victim to a virus or hacker attack, you'll escape with only minor damage. Fail to keep a recent backup though, and you'll go straight to hell--at least, that's how it will feel.


From here:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/113175/article.html


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 8:30 am 
[Team Member]
[Team Member]

Joined: Sat Jun 26, 2004 4:31 am
Posts: 11101
Location: Home Sweet Home
LOL! :lol: Joe C!!!! That was great! It had all good advice as well.

When I finish up a system for anyone I add a program called WOT and it eliminates 99% of people clicking on a bogus or bad link. Yes, it is a free program but it is very safe and actually works!

http://www.mywot.com/

Nasty


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 9:01 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 12:59 pm
Posts: 21
:P Joe, Thank you. What you put up there is a classic. I copied and pasted it to a blank word document so I can print it. With your permission I'd like to share your Ten Commandments for PC on Facebook's "PC eXperts." That was marvelous and I'm very grateful.


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 1:46 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2012 6:25 pm
Posts: 25
I would like to give you permission but it's not mine,
I got it from here
http://www.pcworld.com/article/113175/article.html


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 4:53 pm 
Team Member Top 10
Team Member Top 10
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Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2004 2:55 pm
Posts: 9242
Location: back on the right side of the middle of the left side YES i'm folding
to be fair, they got it from Microsoft.


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:03 am 
8086
8086
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 03, 2004 7:07 am
Posts: 55
Location: New York City
"I rarely click on banner ads".... there you go... "Honest I can't figure how I got this disease"... "I rarely have sex without using protection."


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 3:03 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 12:59 pm
Posts: 21
What with the worldwide Java exploits, banner ads not being safe, it's not enough to avoid opening attachments from unknown sources. The internet is wonderful but dangerous.


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 Post subject: Re: Ten Commandments for PC necessary
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 3:10 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 12:59 pm
Posts: 21
Nastyman, I've enrolled with WOT for Chrome and will abide by it. Thank you.


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