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 Post subject: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2013 4:56 am 
8086
8086

Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2013 4:52 am
Posts: 2
know there must be a lot of threads here asking for help on assembling computers, so thanks a lot if you even bothered to open this! :)

On the topic; I am mostly illiterate about computers and as mentioned this is the first time I am trying this, so right now I don't even have a full list of hardware, but more general inquiries. I apologise if some of the stuff or all of the stuff mentioned sounds stupid or too far off, all help and corrections will be much appreciated.

Also, I live in India so I would be ordering from these sites(or trying retail):
www.flipkart.com
www.theitdepot.com
www.homeshop18.com

My Budget is ~Rs. 90,000. I want to be able to run most modern games like Crysis 3, Bioshock Infinite, etc. on high or near high settings.

The items listed below are those I managed to pick out so far and the queries regarding them, if you know of better items or if some of these are just stupid choices then PLEASE point it out.

Processor: I am thinking between Intel 3.5 GHz LGA1150 4770K i7 4th Gen(~Rs. 23500) or Intel 3.5 GHz LGA1155 Core i7 3770K(~Rs. 21000), there is some price difference between the two, looking at AnandTech and a few other sites for bench marks comparison, the 4770K seems clearly a bit better but does it really make much of a difference for gaming?
*Note on AMD processors*: I see that AMD prcoessors, especially the FX series, are very popular among people, going by discussions regarding assembling I read here and on other forums that is, however on comparison with Intel a)I find there is a monumental price difference; most 6-core AMD processors are at ~Rs 7500, that too with better specs like cache, etc. b) but, on making benchmarks comparison with the 4-core i7 3770K, AMD's 6-core processors seem far behind. SO, is the ~11k price difference worth it? Or are there AMD processors that, though much behind Intel's, in themselves offer good enough performance for running heavy games? If so I would go with an AMD processor as it really saves a lot of money, which may be used to get better specs on other items, but I don't want to compromise TOO much on performance.

Motherboard: So far I have narrowed it to ASRock Z77 Extreme 6 Motherboard (~Rs.13500) and Intel DH77EB Motherboard(~Rs. 6800), again there is a substantial price difference and I am confused regarding which one would be more optimal for each brand of processor. BUT BUT, I haven't done a lot of searching around for motherboards, so there may be way better options out there, so please share!

RAM: Corsair Vengence 8GB X 2

Secondary Memory: 1 X 256 GB SSD, 1 TB HDD, 500 GB HDD.

GPU: No idea.

Case, cooling system, power supply: No idea.

OS: Windows 7/8.

Again, the items listed above are those I managed to pick out so far and the queries regarding them, if you know of better items or if some of these are just stupid choices then PLEASE point it out. Be gentle! :P

Thanks again for taking time to read through all this.


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2013 7:17 pm 
Coppermine
Coppermine
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Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 4:40 pm
Posts: 697
Welcome to the forums! Hope you enjoy building computers as much as we do.

Several comments/suggestions (all meant to be constructive so don't take them any other way):
  • 90,000 Rupees are approximately $1500, but the prices you're quoting are approximately 10-15% higher than what we would see here; still, you should be able to build a computer that meets your criteria of gaming at high or near-high settings.
  • Keep in mind that when you are building a computer for gaming purposes, the GPU is the most relevant component, so you'll want to put as much money as feasible towards the graphics card.
  • Socket 1155 (Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge) is last generation; socket 1150 (Haswell) is the new generation. In the US, the prices are about the same so it's preferable to go with Haswell. Personally, I would start with a build based on socket 1150. If you truly get into a money crunch, you can see if switching to 1155 would be of any benefit.
  • As for the CPU, while it's great to have the top of the line 4770K (or 3770K), the i5 version (4670K) is perfectly suitable for your computer. Not only will it save money, but there will be no ill effect to your computer's gaming performance. In fact, the 4570 and 4430 will still be acceptable.
  • Speaking of CPUs, don't discount AMD processors. An FX-6300 would be the great basis for a gaming CPU. Also, consider the FX-8350 - it competitive with the 3570K.
  • Keep in mind the motherboard has to match CPU (meaning an 1150 CPU needs an 1150 motherboard). Z77 is compatible with 1155; Z87 is compatible with 1150
  • As to the motherboards you selected, one is an ATX board, the other is a Micro ATX (or MATX) board. The ATX is larger and has more expansion slots; thus, it typically costs more. Since this is your first build, I know it will be harder to know exactly what you need, but pay attention to the rear panel ports and what kind of cards you will be using in your computer. My guess is you would need the GPU and maybe a wireless adapter. If those are all you need, the MATX may be the better option - it's cheaper and will allow you to devote more money to the GPU.
  • Case: you're the one that will be looking at it so this is truly up to you. To be on the safe side, just make sure the case says it supports ATX motherboards.
  • PSU should be 550-650W and from a reliable manufacturer (Corsair, OCZ, Antec)
  • An 3rd party CPU cooler is advisable, but not a requirement unless you plan on overclocking or the ambient room temperature is high. The EVO 212 is highly popular and cheap. If it's in the budget, a closed-loop water cooler is effective and usually easy to set up, like the Corsair H60.
  • Finally, the GPU. On AMD's side, there's the 7970 and 7950; nVidia offers the 760 & 770. All 4 should provide the horsepower you need. With your budget, you should be able to afford the 760 and 7950 easily (though I would discourage the 7950 since it the least competitive of the 4 and cost more than the 760). It is possible that depending on the other components you choose, you might squeeze in the 7970 or 770, but you'll have to crunch the numbers.

Hope this helps. Keep us posted on how things go.


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 8:43 am 
Smithfield
Smithfield

Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 7:37 pm
Posts: 5230
Just a comment...

btdog, why you no recommend Seasonic for PSUs?


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 11:02 am 
Little Foot
Little Foot

Joined: Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:20 pm
Posts: 112
Um haswell prices I see are not similar where are you guys shopping? Um as to the build I will reccomend cooler master or antec for power supplies myself.


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:51 pm 
Coppermine
Coppermine
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Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 4:40 pm
Posts: 697
Quote:
btdog, why you no recommend Seasonic for PSUs?

In a build where every dollar is important, I usually suggest less expensive - but still reliable - PSUs. If a person has a large enough budget, I definitely suggest Seasonic. Unfortunately, most people have small budgets and big dreams.

Personally, I've never used Seasonic, but there's no denying it has an outstanding reputation. And while it is a higher caliber product, it comes with a hefty price tag.

Quote:
Um haswell prices I see are not similar where are you guys shopping?

Newegg. Remember this is a foreign-based build. The price he quoted for a 4470k was 23,500 rupees (or ~$395). I already noted his prices were about 10-15% higher than what we're seeing. I was pretty close to the mark ($340 x 1.15 = $391).

BTW, yes, I know of MicroCenter & if you're lucky enough to live near one, you're a fool not to buy the mobo and CPU there.


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 6:59 pm 
Smithfield
Smithfield

Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 7:37 pm
Posts: 5230
I've seen Seasonic go toe-to-toe pricewise with some of the other reputable brands.


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 1:24 am 
8086
8086

Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2013 4:52 am
Posts: 2
@btdog: Thanks so much for all those suggestions! I didn't know about socket 1150 thing and didn't know whether to consider the i5 processors and the fx series, so you have saved a lot on my budget.

Also you are right, electronic products here are a bit more expensive here than in US.

Currently I am leaning towards FX 8350, as it seems close enough to i5 4670K's performance and would save me some more for the GPU.

I see some other motherboards from ASRock, cheaper than Z87, with ATX form factor also sell with FX 8350(970 Extreme4, Extreme3, etc.). So for choosing the motherboard is there something like certain brand or types would run better with a given CPU/GPU(aprt from the socket thing)? Wireless adapaters is for wireless peripherals, right? I don't think I would be using them, apart from that all I would be putting in there is the cpu, 1 gpu, ram(I plan on using 2 of 1 X 8GB DDR3, tohugh I think any motherboard could hold these?) and LAN card.

Also, about the case, aprt from ATX compatibility, is who it looks the only main consideration?


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 10:55 pm 
Coppermine
Coppermine
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Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 4:40 pm
Posts: 697
Quote:
...all I would be putting in there is the cpu, 1 gpu, ram(I plan on using 2 of 1 X 8GB DDR3, tohugh I think any motherboard could hold these?) and LAN card.

Do you need a LAN card? Most motherboards include an ethernet connection so I'm not sure you need it.

As for the RAM, 8GBs for a gaming computer is ample: so I would suggest you go for 2x4GBs instead of 16GBs. This should save some money you can apply towards the GPU.

As for the motherboards, a CPU will function the same regardless of the brand.

That said, some motherboards offer better overclocking ability and each manufacturer has their own suite of software which includes some utilities that add some nice (though not mandatory) features. Also, some motherboards have a higher failure rate than others.

Bottom line: do your research. A good start would be reading the details on several motherboards from different manufacturers. Also, read the reviews...BUT...read them with a grain of salt. Some are good, some are bad, many add little value...so you have to be a discerning reader.

Hope this helps.


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 Post subject: Re: Building a gaming rig for the first time.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 11:21 pm 
Smithfield
Smithfield

Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 7:37 pm
Posts: 5230
The reason why we tell people to stop at 8GB...

In 64-bit Windows environments, 32-bit applications are limited to only 2GB of available memory. They will not take advantage of the full 4GB range unless they were compiled with a specific flag. This is more of a note for games, which practically all games are released as 32-bit executeables. And since games are usually the most demanding thing people with build requests/advice run, then we don't see a reason to tell people to add more RAM than their system will ever use.

And most programs you use anyway rarely go beyond 500MB-750MB of memory. So even if you were running many applications, you'd have to be running a lot before memory becomes an issue.

Usually when you start to have issues running out of memory is when:
  • You're doing a bunch of HD video editing or super high resolution Photoshop work
  • You're running multiple VMs
  • Some other application that does eat up a lot of memory

Also, more memory does not automatically equate to more performance. Memory performance is one of the things in computers that has rapidly diminishing gains the more you add.


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