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 Post subject: Multiplier
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 7:16 pm 
Thunderbird
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There's an option to unlock it and let it run at LOWER speeds. Not higher... is there a way to do this?

Oh and a quick question... which is better... lower multiplier and higher bus speed, or lower bus speed and stock 17x muliplier?


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 9:48 pm 
Team Member
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HI Kyl3 if your have an Intel chip then there is absolutely no way to change the multiplyer if you have an amd chip you should have a bit of play in either direction. To answer your question would require you to post more information here like your cpu, mobo, psu, & ram. However it is always best if you can run your FSB:DRAM at a 1:1 ratio. This helps eliminate bottlenecking by running your entire bus at the same speed. The faster the FSB the faster the data is transmitted. So most of the time it is better to have a higher ratio on the FSB. Hope this helps.


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 Post subject: Re: Multiplier
PostPosted: Sat Mar 12, 2005 11:49 pm 
Celeron
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Kyl3 wrote:
There's an option to unlock it and let it run at LOWER speeds. Not higher... is there a way to do this?

Oh and a quick question... which is better... lower multiplier and higher bus speed, or lower bus speed and stock 17x muliplier?


Just about every modern CPU has the upper multipliers locked, with the exception of the FXs.

Higher bus speed, lower multipliers will give you better performance compared to the other solution - if the RAM can take it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2005 7:16 am 
Thunderbird
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Thanks guys... But only the FX line of AMD chips has the muliplier unlocked... that sucks... I have an Intel P4 550 anyway so...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2005 1:06 pm 
Boy in Black
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serialclocker wrote:
...if your have an Intel chip then there is absolutely no way to change the multiplyer...
Nope. Abit and Asus both allow you to drop the multiplier on certain Intel chips (550+) down to 14x to allow a FSB hike into the stratosphere.

Abit's: Added in BIOS 17 (line 5).

Asus' site is crapping on me, but theirs was the first I believe with the P5AD2, and was standard in the P5AD2-E's default BIOS. Mine will let you drop to 12x even. That's real sweet for the already ramped 3.46EE (323 starts to stress things a bit for that poor sucker).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2005 4:07 pm 
Thunderbird
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I can lower mine... But if I lower my Muliplier to 14 and keep my OC'ed bus speed (217 as opposed to 200) it'll be at 3.04GHz at the same temp as it is at 3.7GHz with the 17 multiplier.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2005 4:40 pm 
Thunderbird
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But with the lower multiplier means lower temps.
Which allows you to up the FSB without the temp gain.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2005 1:24 pm 
8086
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filmbot wrote:
But with the lower multiplier means lower temps.
Which allows you to up the FSB without the temp gain.

^Full of crap

Any given chip has a top speed that it will run at. The key is to hit that speed while also hitting the top speed your ram will run (or your mobo will allow the fsb to run), this is why the multiplier tweak is so nice.

Temps are not going to increase noticeably by simply running the chip faster, they are going to increase when you start to increase the voltage (a good way to get a few extra mhz, or a few hunred extra for that matter)

SO the moral of the story, drop the multiplier as low as you can and start bumping that fsb up until it can go no higher. Once you determine that top speed, stick with it and start increasing your mulitplier. Easiest way to do it.

However if you are fooling with an Intel chip the only way to mess with the "multiplier" I know of is to tweak the ram:fsb ratio. Although you arent literally changing the cpu multiplier, this is effectively what is being done.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2005 12:14 am 
Boy in Black
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..or meet it half way. If you ramp the FSB as far as it goes, then the multiplier may get just so far. It may be worth topping out the FSB, backing it off a bit, then try the multiplier again. where you may have gotten just 14x to work, doing this may get you a fast FSB and a 16x multiplier. The resulting benchmark will show that the high bus along with the next achieved multiplier to be a better gain than the maxed out FSB one.

Most of the boards coupled with great memory can shoot for the FSB moon. So, you can almost count on the multiplier being the limiting factor. I'd personally go the other way and go as fast as you can without dropping the multiplier. Once you feel you can't go any further, start ramping the FSB. Once that wall is hit, you can then start going back and forth and aim for that sweet spot. I'd personally take a 16x by 266Mhz over a 14x by 275 if given the choice.And most of the 925x/xe chips should allow modification of the Intel multiplier. You need to have a CPU with the PRB1 rating...

Cpu's of different speed at the same voltages, load, and motherboard can have different temps. This is because they consume more power than the other. If it consumes more power, it transers it, and it becomes heat. A 540 consumes 90 watts, a 560 may consume 93 watts, and a 570's is around 106 watts. This then turns into a hotter running CPU. So, it is pretty safe to say that overclocking the core will make it hotter.


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