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 Post subject: Expanding home network with router
PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:37 am 
8086
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Location: Canada
am setting up a extensive home network. It will have a total of 6 clients connected through UTP and a minimum of 3 thought wireless. I have included a basic diagram for this network. I am trying to reduce traffic by installing a second router in one of the rooms. The first router is ISP provided wireless router modem which then feeds to a switch that the rest of the clients are connected through. The second router will connect trough the switch as well. The problem I am facing is I can not get access to the network shares of the clients connected to the switch from the clients connect to the second router. I do not seem to have issue with internet connection or sharing within the network of the second router.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 5:29 am 
Hired Gun
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That’s because the 2nd router created another sub network. The computers behind the 2nd router are in their own network. The 2nd router is not necessary. Your network isn't even close to being large enough to require 2 routers, the first one is more then enough to handle it. Are the computer behind the 2nd router wired or wireless? I suggest removing the 2nd router. If you need it to expand your wireless network then you need to turn off DHCP and put it in WAP mode, also you need to connect it to the rest of the network through one of the switch ports not the WAN port.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 1:18 pm 
Million Club - 2 Plus
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Actually, I would have the switch connect to dedicated wireless router and that to the modem. I find that the wireless in the modems are less that reliable and you have more control over your dedicated router. This way, the router connects to the modem for internet access and assigns the clients all the ip addresses.

Ex.
192.168.1.1 (modem) -> 192.168.0.1 (router) -> Switch -> 192.168.0.2-254 (clients)


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 2:05 pm 
Hired Gun
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Location: N 47° 04.525 W 122° 17.315
Airheadq wrote:
Actually, I would have the switch connect to dedicated wireless router and that to the modem. I find that the wireless in the modems are less that reliable and you have more control over your dedicated router. This way, the router connects to the modem for internet access and assigns the clients all the ip addresses.

Ex.
192.168.1.1 (modem) -> 192.168.0.1 (router) -> Switch -> 192.168.0.2-254 (clients)


It works best if you put the modem in bridge mode. Either way the router is in the wrong position. Either place it how Airheadq said or get rid of it.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 1:15 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 10:04 am
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The idea of using multiple routers in this situation doesn't make much sense, esp. for wired connections. All your wired connections are using a switch, which by definition establishes DEDICATED connections between the various wired devices. In fact, using another router (specifically, the integrated switch) can actually make matters WORSE since all traffic BETWEEN the routers (switches) are now concentrated to that single connection!

As someone else said, you’re not remotely close to needing anything that complicated. Heck, I’m a software developer by trade w/ more devices than I can count (PCs, servers, internet radios, TiVo’s, network printers, handheld devices, you name it), and even I have only a single router/switch. In the old days this type of segmentation was often necessary due to the use of HUBS. But w/ the proliferation of SWITCHES these days, it’s generally pointless, certainly for home use.

The only thing I would consider worthy of consideration is perhaps using multiple wireless APs (preferably different channels). With a proper network topology, you could establish various hotspots throughout the home and eliminate some radio congestion. Wireless is more like the old days of hubs since it’s a SHARED resource. There can only be ONE wireless connection between any two wireless stations on the same frequency at any given time. So as more wireless users attempt to access the same AP at the same time, effective wireless throughout goes down.

But for wired connections, you’re wasting your time and money, and only making your network that much more difficult to manage and with no appreciable benefits.


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