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 Post subject: Programs for Coding
PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 9:08 pm 
Coppermine
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What is the best program for coding. I am thinking about C++ or something other that does alot of code well.

Is Microsoft Visual Studio even that good?
I went to Microsoft's Dreamspark and downloaded all the programs, it was awesome and incredible to how much they would be if i had to pay.

Just free programs for ANY type of coding.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 3:37 am 
Sharptooth
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I highly suggest Netbeans. It handles a multitude of languages right out of the box, and can handle even more by downloading plugins. It also seems to work better than Eclipse when using a off-site database.

Which platform willl you be developing on? If you are on WIndows Netbeans will install with out the need for Cygwin while if you want to use Eclipse in Windows you will also need to download and install Cygwin. If you are developing on Linux, either Netbeans or Eclipse will iinstall natively, but since you mentioned MS Visual Studio, I doubt you are on a linux box.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 4:12 am 
SON OF A GUN
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WTF? The few times I actually installed Eclipse I didn't need cygwin.

Since you are a student and you were able to take advantage of the dreamspark program, why don't you just us visual studio? You can work with C++ just fine there.

You could also use C# for that matter (my language of choice). Is Visual Studio that good? LOL. How about you use it for yourself and find out. It is one of the better IDEs I have used and I would be willing to say it is the best I have used.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 4:51 am 
Java Junkie
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In my opinion, people who are just starting to learn to code should not use IDEs. They are confusing and encourage bad habits.

A text editor and a compiler are all you need.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 7:40 am 
Coppermine
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Thank you. I have had Netbeans for awhile, but didn't know it did more than Java (that's what I related to it most and heard about it).

It's just that if there is something better, even if it's not commercial, I would want it.

I did not here about Visual Studio, and there are not many reviews so I don't know if it's good enough.

We have Visual Studio 2005 on our college laptops and the teacher is making us use it, but I started with Notepad++.

We are just using Visual to open programs to edit or learn from right now so I can't say how good it is, but there have been no problems so far.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 4:37 pm 
7yrs+11,000 Posts
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Dev C++ is a pretty good IDE/compiler if you are starting out. Its a bit outdated, but it will work well while you are learning.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 7:46 pm 
Coppermine
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About learning. I am having a hard time, only because we are being taught a weird way. We see the programs, like "Hello World" and others and then try to correct them or just learn alot of things and then getting little done when typing it in. Is there a recommended way of learning C++ or is everything fair game?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 4:42 am 
Java Junkie
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Different people learn in different ways ... you'll have to find a method that works for you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 5:44 am 
SON OF A GUN
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Everybody who has had formal training in programming has seen at lest 20 hello world applications. It is pretty standard.

I am not sure that giving you a broken program and asking you to fix it is the way to teach a language. It is good for learning how to debug applications but not how to write them.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:38 pm 
Willamette
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My take is that as long as they're showing you how to do it correctly, showing you how to fix the common problems is quite useful. But they have to show you how to do it first, otherwise you don't understand WHY the problems happened.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:47 pm 
7yrs+11,000 Posts
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maniacm0nk3y wrote:
About learning. I am having a hard time, only because we are being taught a weird way. We see the programs, like "Hello World" and others and then try to correct them or just learn alot of things and then getting little done when typing it in. Is there a recommended way of learning C++ or is everything fair game?

Correcting and improving upon already written code is an excellent way for some to learn....that's pretty much how I started learning, but I'd imagine its different for everyone.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:55 pm 
Willamette
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Yes, different strokes for different folks. The most critical thing is understanding the code though. It doesn't really sound like the teacher's doing that great of a job at explaining the why of the things from what's being said, but we're not in the class.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2008 6:11 pm 
Little Foot
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Jipstyle wrote:
In my opinion, people who are just starting to learn to code should not use IDEs. They are confusing and encourage bad habits.

A text editor and a compiler are all you need.


Well when I started learning Java, I used a basic IDE (BlueJ). Even though it indented for me, etc., it taught me good habits that carried over (both when I code in Notepad, and when I use a more advanced IDE).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 1:14 pm 
8086
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The progam for developement largely depends on the languaged used. Visual Studio is AMAZING but only works for .net, and c++

HIGHLY RECOMENDED!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 1:18 pm 
SON OF A GUN
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shutout5591 wrote:
The progam for developement largely depends on the languaged used. Visual Studio is AMAZING but only works for .net, and c++

HIGHLY RECOMENDED!
Sort of right....

First of all, Visual studio supports C#, VB.NET, C++.NET, and I think J# (still?). If you are using Visual studio, it is .NET.

You CAN "trick" Visual Studio into compiling non .NET C++ though.


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