Quantcast

Maximum PC

It is currently Thu Apr 17, 2014 4:49 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Math's importance to programming?
PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2004 3:55 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2004 3:39 pm
Posts: 2
Hello, I am new here. I don't want to sound like a total dumby but what level of math skills is necessary in order to be a good programmer?

From what I understand math is applied in programming quite frequently. While I am good with computer hardware I don't believe I posses even the basic math skills to even attempt to learn programming.

Can someone with programming experience tell me what math skills I need to acquire in order to proceed forward? Thank u.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2004 5:03 pm 
Java Junkie
Java Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 10:23 am
Posts: 24218
Location: Granite Heaven
Initially, all you need are good analytical skills. Logic and reasoning are most importantly, rather than pure math.

Depending on what kind of programming you are doing, you will need more maths ... but it isn't terribly important at first. The type of programming you do will also dictate the kinds of math that you need.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2004 6:01 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2004 3:39 pm
Posts: 2
Thanks for the information Jipstyle. I believe you are right. I will need to address the situation as it comes along. No need in worrying over the particulars until I get there. It's good to know programming isn't all math though. I am like alot of people out there that have that fear of math becuase it involves dreaded "numbers". :wink:


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2004 7:48 pm 
Java Junkie
Java Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 10:23 am
Posts: 24218
Location: Granite Heaven
Hehehe ... don't worry ... math doesn't really get hard until they STOP using numbers.

;)

Have fun.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2004 8:04 pm 
Little Foot
Little Foot

Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:14 pm
Posts: 143
I'm currently in a Software Development program (getting a degree), and for the first year, we are using C. All of the assignments we've been doing are math oriented (income tax calculator[Canadian taxes!:P], UPC/ISBN number converter, etc.), but don't require a high level of math. If you know exponents, square roots, arithmetic, and the modulus function, you're golden :D.
However, strong logical and analytical skills are required to debug, as well as problem solving and lateral thinking for designing your program's algorithyms.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 23, 2004 2:25 am 
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000*
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000*
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 11:32 pm
Posts: 2555
Location: Somewhere between compilation and linking
As you get into assembly, understanding different number systems will become important. Intially, as Jipsytle point out, it is mostly about logical operations < <= > >= == != etc. At first, you need to be able to think like a mathematician, will this program solve the given problem, rather than actually be a mathematician. As you get into algorithm courses, you'll start doing some pretty hairy math - recurrence relations mostly. You'll need to understand things like NP and NPC. If you want to work with graphics, you'll run into linear algebra. In a nutshell, you'll run into math everywhere in computer science, computers after all, are nothing more than binary calculators and computer science is applied mathematics. However, we're able to abstract away a lot of it.

My personal take is this. Don't fear the math. If you're smart enough to be a good programmer, you're definitely (note that it is spelled correctly) smart enough to do the math. And if you're not quite that sharp, you won't be trying anthing all that hairy anyways (ie, you'll become a VB programmer!), but you'll still enjoy working on a huge number of different programs. You just won't write the next great parallel sorting algorithm or find a way to do the knapsack problem in n^3 time.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 23, 2004 8:47 am 
In the lab!
In the lab!
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 10:47 am
Posts: 831
Location: Secret Laboratory
It depends on the programming you're doing. If you're just doing hobby programming and making little windows applications in VB, C#, c++, etc or writting web applications in PHP, Perl, etc then high school level math is all you're probabbly going to end up using. Basic algebra type stuff.

If you're talking about being a professional programmer that creates weather simulations, writes OSes from scratch, etc then you're going to need some heafty math. We're talking 4 years of college math classes here; Analytic Geometry, Calculus, Linear Algegra, Discrete Mathmatics, Physics, Statistics and plenty more!


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2004 4:06 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 10:59 am
Posts: 50
Logic is more important in my opinion, unless, like Dexter pointed out, the specifics of the program forces some more math upon you.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2004 5:34 pm 
Team Member Top 100
Team Member Top 100

Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 5:35 pm
Posts: 1176
I'd say math is pretty important for programming.
Not your basic stuff, but for some things math is key.

As an example, check out the "swapping doubles" thread here.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 24, 2004 8:34 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 10:59 am
Posts: 50
How do you even THINK to come up with a solution like that? I would've taken me a week or two for the hard solution.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2004 4:49 pm 
Team Member Top 100
Team Member Top 100

Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 5:35 pm
Posts: 1176
Why?
All it takes is knowledge of the properties of numbers and how they are represented in the computer.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 12:47 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 10:59 am
Posts: 50
I mean without the hint. It was supremely easy (1-5 seconds) *after* the hint.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 1:04 pm 
8086
8086

Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 2:24 pm
Posts: 6
Location: http://twirp.net
I think you mainly need basic algebra/geometry...
I haven't seem any programming problems that require anything higher
But once you get into assembly code ans stuff... :roll: ...


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 1:12 pm 
Team Member Top 100
Team Member Top 100

Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 5:35 pm
Posts: 1176
Quote:
But once you get into assembly code ans stuff... Rolling Eyes ...

..you still don't need anything more advanced?


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Math's importance to programming?
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2004 4:15 pm 
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 4:04 pm
Posts: 985
Location: Earth
vocivus wrote:
Hello, I am new here. I don't want to sound like a total dumby but what level of math skills is necessary in order to be a good programmer?

From what I understand math is applied in programming quite frequently. While I am good with computer hardware I don't believe I posses even the basic math skills to even attempt to learn programming.

Can someone with programming experience tell me what math skills I need to acquire in order to proceed forward? Thank u.


Not a whole lot of math. The reason for the higher level maths are to help you in your reasoning skills. Logic and good analytical skills are really the most important things.

you will run into mathematics, but it's not something you can't tackle. My algorithms class was very math oriented, but it was more related towards proving run times rather than coming up with some mathematical formula. In most cases, I used up to pre-calculus level mathematics.

Computer Graphics made me learn Linear Algebra - some proofs but nothing too much.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:31 am 
Little Foot
Little Foot

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:28 am
Posts: 155
We'll im currently goin to LaSalle university and Getting a BS in Computer Science (programming) I'm required to take Calculus and Analytic Geometry I and II then Descrete Structures I and II (Descretes logic) and Then I still have to Take General Physics I and II and then i end with Electronics Physics I and II. Oh and my school does offer AI Programmin(Lisp), Comptuer Graphics Programming, Operating SYstems programming, ANd a game programming course along with alot of others.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:45 am 
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000
Bitchin' Fast 3D Z8000
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 4:04 pm
Posts: 985
Location: Earth
SirBob1701 wrote:
We'll im currently goin to LaSalle university and Getting a BS in Computer Science (programming) I'm required to take Calculus and Analytic Geometry I and II then Descrete Structures I and II (Descretes logic) and Then I still have to Take General Physics I and II and then i end with Electronics Physics I and II. Oh and my school does offer AI Programmin(Lisp), Comptuer Graphics Programming, Operating SYstems programming, ANd a game programming course along with alot of others.



Cool! :) Have fun being a C.S. major, I thoroughly enjoy my major and love every second of it.

Math in CS is more in terms of helping you build your analytical skills. I found that in my Discrete Structures class, we focused a lot on Induction while in Design of algorithms, we focused a lot on recurrence relations. You'll be doing a lot of coding, yes, but don't overlook any Software Engineeering courses that you find, they are important if you end up in software design.

As a matter of fact, just do what I did and just keep taking classes even though you no longer need them. ;)


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:48 am 
Little Foot
Little Foot

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:28 am
Posts: 155
i plan on it im probably gonna take every comp sci class i can after my core is outta the way. next semsesters java (im only a freshman) which should be a breeze since i know c++ and then i have Data Structures and so on. Senior year should be fun because i have to build and maintain a program in a group enviroment.


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 8:02 am 
Java Junkie
Java Junkie
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2004 10:23 am
Posts: 24218
Location: Granite Heaven
You'll be better served taking arts courses with your electives. Once you have the core courses down, you'll be able to teach yourself any of the material from other CS courses ... but the breadth and depth that a few arts courses will offer your education can't be underestimated.

Your career will be VERY well served by being able to write and argue effectively ... and your life will be enhanced by your exposure to philosophy, history and the arts.

Don't be single-minded ... be well-rounded. :)


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 10:15 am 
Little Foot
Little Foot

Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:28 am
Posts: 155
I go to a liberal arts school my core courses require 2 philosopy 2 religion 2 art/music/language 1 phyc and a couple others. And i also have to take alot of cs courses for my BS.


Top
  Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group