FCC Votes to Consider Paid Priority on the Internet

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MrHasselblad

united states government gets involved into the healthcare business = massive fail. Cost a majority of americans more money for less coverage. Did I mention: higher deductibles, most forced to participate (by law, not by option), highest amount of american employment layoffs ever, millions forced from full time to part time.

Yep that will work.

united states federal government tries to get into the internet regulation business; another massive failure

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tekknyne

Obamacare was never designed to make health care more affordable or accessible :P

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devastator9

Send them back to the Stone Age. 2 cans and a string

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Cache

While I oppose the tiered plan approach, I also believe that it will be inevitable so that operators can route their preferred services ahead of others. That is the course of business as a general rule--keep people inside your fence and away from competing businesses.

What concerns me is what kind of data will the consumer be made aware of with regards to this? Will Comcast tell me that Netflix is being pushed to a slower channel that may result in a poor viewing experience for me? Will Time Warner give me access to documentation showing what services they are actively throttling?

When I pay for UPS to deliver my packages from Amazon, I have the choice to decide how fast that process will be. It's laid out in black and white with the effective charges depending of I want faster (or slower) service. Unless the FCC guarantees a method forcing internet providers to disclose what, and by how much they throttle as well as what I need to pay to reach an acceptable service level--then they should not proceed.

And this is before the danger of single-operator markets that do not face competition whatsoever. And--dare I suggest it--what happens if I pay my bill electronically to BB&T, but Time Warner decides that it can wait a day because they are not part of their preferred network with Bank of America? Who pays the late charges when I have no idea who is denied speedy connections--or how long--my electronic correspondence takes to get to its' destination? Thorny issues surround this idea of a tiered internet, and I doubt that most businesses are looking beyond a paycheck before thinking how this could foul a lot of online activities from stocks to banking to news alerts.

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NoCtrl

Just some links for net neutrality

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/05/fcc-hears-public-outcry-continues-consider-pay-play-rules

http://www.freepress.net/blog/2014/05/16/net-neutrality-so-now-what

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bloodgain

"These are not the proposals you are looking for." -- FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler

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CantankerousDave

"Open for discussion" is code for "bidding is now open."

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bencint

The part that upsets me the most is that I already pay for a particular speed. I can choose of I so desire 12, 25, 50 or 100 Mbps download speeds. So if I am paying for 50 Mbps and Comcast throttles my connection to certain sites it is a violation my agreement with them. I'm sure there's some clause somewhere that gets them out of it. Speeds can't be guaranteed due to this that and the third... But for them to intentionally restrict my connection is absurd.

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cc3d

Everything you hate about your cable bill is about to happen to your internet bill:

tiered internet service
premium internet fees for services like YouTube and Google.
Basic internet will get you the tiny & useless sites

email to:

openinternet@fcc.gov

and raise hell!!

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glpeter90

Obama appointed that POS

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Spiral01

It may be time to go back to snail mail for bill payments, purchasing news papers and magazines, and playing single player games purchased at gamestop to avoid and boycot the internet so they get our drfit!

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jgrimoldy

Funny, I never left the snail mail realm for bill payments. Yeah, I get the convenience of billpay or what have you. However, convenience has never trumped the absolute control one has when writing old-school checks and dropping in a mailbox.

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MrHasselblad

Talk to ones local postal worker.

Never guess how long it is since most of ones local post offices have hired full time. Almost all new postal employees are part timers, and switch routes frequently from day to day, week to week.

Do not see the united states postal service lasting into ten years from now

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wolfing

except that mail already is like that. You can pay more for faster deliveries.

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jgrimoldy

It's always tough to use something tangible for a comparison.

Perhaps the mail-to-internet comparison would be more vaild if you supposed this: A friend, two miles away sent you a letter standard first class mail. They are served by the same post-office as you. The post office has the letter and intentionally sits on it for THREE extra days because your friend didn't pay $1 extra for the Über-stamp.

There's legimate costs related to expedited shipping (air vs. surface), then there's flagrant extortion. Comcast's position leans much more on the extortion side.

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dorkish

yep there is one thing these telecoms have forgoten in their greedy rush to the top as long as their is at least two of them they can be taken out by simply switching to one then then the other till they get the message they can only operate so long with no money coming in:)

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vrmlbasic

Clearly the small, unaccountable group in charge of the FCC shouldn't be handling something so quintessential and humongous as the internet. Maybe we should have Congress deal with it as at least we can, in theory, vote them out if the muck it up.

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ApathyCurve

One of the core problems of mature societies is that the bureaucrats inevitably end up in charge. That change happened to most of Europe in the 1960s and to America in the 1990s. Congress today has about as much power as your HOA; the bureaucrats are the ones who craft the rules which impact your daily life. There are ultimately only two solutions to this problem: complete societal collapse or revolution. Neither of those options appeal to me, nor should they to you.

The FCC has positioned itself to become the most powerful bureaucracy of the 21st century. I predict (which I can do safely, as I'll be dead) that by the end of this century, that crest you see next to this article will be one of the most reviled in human history.

Have a nice weekend.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Are you referring to the "Open" Internet without Central Control?

If that is the one you are referring to, then "I" will dictate how it is run along with Anonymous, Russian and Chinese Hackers, Comedians and everyone else

To let any one Individual or group decide is the exact opposite of "Open" and without Central Control

That includes Congress, and of course they will muck it up on purpose

That's how they get paid... by the Control FREAKS!

Congress may decide how their internal network is run and can divide it up into slow, slower and slowest lanes as they please

But once they assume the non-existent authority to dictate how everyone elses Internet is run, and then charge extra to get this baby up to 88mph....

Yer gonna see some serious shit!

Disclaimer:
That is not a threat!
That is a prediction!

If comcast gave any indication to netflix that Comcast could provide the service Netflix required and paid for but are not capable or willing to provide the service they indicated, comcast should beaf up it's service on it's own dime instead of requiring me or you to pay for their network upgrades

Deliver what you say you can deliver or get out of the provider business instead of ruining your customers business

WHY would Netfix or anyone else switch to Comcast if they knew beforehand that Comcast could not or WOULD NOT deliver the service they indicated

and WHY would Comcast sell a service to Netflix without indicating first to Netflix that they could not provide the speeds and feeds that Netflix REQUIRED and paid for?

Show me some EVIDENCE!

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vrmlbasic

Comcast's dimes are our dimes.

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Bucket_Monster

"WHY would Netfix or anyone else switch to Comcast if they knew beforehand that Comcast could not or WOULD NOT deliver the service they indicated"

That's not really what's going on here. In order for Netflix to be available to Comcast subscribers, they'd have no choice but to agree to whatever terms Comcast has. Netflix isn't "switching" to Comcast, they have to abide by Comcast's terms unless they want to seriously slash their customer base. Comcast is a huge provider. Whatever money they are paying to Comcast is peanuts compared to the huge revenue losses by not having their service available to Comcast customers.

In the US, it's not as simple as just switching providers for the end user. Cable companies have monopolies on the areas they service. Your only other option would be to switch to DSL if you didn't want your local cable provider, and DSL is generally worse than cable, not to mention that if you're interested in TV you'd be using a satellite dish company if you go with your local telephone company. And no, Netflix and its ilk are not a complete replacement for TV broadcasting, in case anybody was going to say "you don't need TV with Netflix, Hulu, etc!" I don't want to have to torrent new shows I can't watch on those services.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

I just want evidence that Netflix knew "Beforehand" that they were buying less than the speeds and feeds required to run their business

If they knew beforehand that Comcast could not deliver the speed required to run their business, then YES, I agree that Netflix should learn to live within their means and not make demands of Comcast that cannot reasonably expect

I just want EVIDENCE as to who is at fault here

Is that so much to ask?

Right now Laws are being passed based on he said/she said that will affect everyone and I have yet to see any EVIDENCE for either side

All I want to know is....
1. WHAT EXACTLY did Netflix purchase from Comcast?
2. WHAT EXACTLY did Comcast deliver?

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LatiosXT

Hum, a conundrum.

Treating all traffic as fair and equal, or making people pay more so their content can arrive in a timely manner. Honestly, I don't think it's a black and white answer.

I say this because when I use snail mail, I think my packages are top priority, so if they can overnight deliver it, they shouldn't charge an arm and a leg.

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Mikey109105

Thanks to the FCC, we are now ****ed. Screw you Tom Wheeler you worthless piece of lying shit.

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dgrmouse

Agree, 100%. If the FCC ruled that Comcast can't throttle BitTorrent why would they then empower them to throttle Netflix?

ApathyCurve said, "One of the core problems of mature societies is that the bureaucrats inevitably end up in charge."

We live in a specialized society, so it's not really alarming that there would be careers devoted to the service of government or politics. The real issue is the corrupting influence of special interest groups. In this case, we have at least two commissioners that made their fortunes in the employ of telcos and who are demonstrably doing everything in their considerable power to benefit their peers rather than the public at large.

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satanforaday

Could not agree more....

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Upyourbucket

I swear, for everything you enjoy in this life... there is that one asshole who makes it their purpose to destroy what you love.