E3 2014: Razer CEO Talks Project Christine, New Computer Case, and More [Video]

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Bullwinkle J Moose

DP

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Rift2

Very young CEO....

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LatiosXT

Licensing case designs, that's a new one. I wonder how they'll turn out.

As for Christine... It's a sound theory, but I still think it'll take a majority of manufacturers to agree on a standard. And even if they can agree on a standard, how many people will actually buy into it? Intel and AMD tried to inject new form factors, both of which were sound designs, but none of them really took off.

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MaximumMike

>>As for Christine... It's a sound theory,

I'll give you that Christine could work functionally. But RAZER is selling that this is more modular and cheaper than standard form factors like ATX. I have already shown how it is inferior in every possible way on a prior thread. I wouldn't call being inferior to the current standard a sound design.

>>but I still think it'll take a majority of manufacturers to agree on a standard.

They already have. So, why would they want to switch to an inferior one that will be more expensive?

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LatiosXT

Your arguments were basically "it's less modular than current computers" and "latency issues". I fail to see how this is less modular than current computers. Similar modularity sure, but not less. Latency issues can be resolved with creative solutions to the design, and if the effective travel distance remains the same, then there is no issue.

And really the only problem RAZER is doing is trying to answer a question nobody asked. Then again, that's almost like technology in general.

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MaximumMike

>>Your arguments were basically "it's less modular than current computers" and "latency issues".

I also argued that Christine will be more expensive and wastes space.

>> I fail to see how this is less modular than current computers.

I specifically argued that it is less modular because it won't give you any motherboard of your choosing and wont let you swap the mobo, cpu, and ram indepenedently. I also argued that the lack of diversity of motherboards will lead to less modular designs as less technology options will be available. Those are pretty big issues to just dismiss with no explanation.

>>Latency issues can be resolved with creative solutions to the design,

Latency is an issue of time, which is a function of distance and speed. I think quantum physics is a little outside the ambitions of Project Christine, so I'm not sure what creative solutions overcome the problem of having components too far away from one another and yet make the system more modular and less costly.

>>and if the effective travel distance remains the same, then there is no issue.

I think it's interesting that you talk about effective distance here, as opposed to actual distance. This implies the need for some device that would "effectively" reduce the distance. I would imagine some kind of ultra fast buffer or repeater, but am not aware of any such device for PC's. But even if such a device existed, how do you propose that its addition into the design makes Christine superior to a standard form factor that doesn't require such trickery? Wouldn't such a device be proprietary, add to the cost, consume more power, take up more space, create more compatibility issues (think less modularity), and still probably not function as well?

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joehendrey

Motherboards are the atx attempt at modularity. Saying that Christine doesn't let you choose your motherboard is a flawed argument since effectively the case is the motherboard. Project Christine is about moving past motherboards in the way we currently think about them. Not everyone is comfortable with plugging components into a mobo (sounds strange, but believe me, people don't even trust themselves to plug HDMI devices into the correct socket on their tv).

As for latency, I'm not an electrical engineer, but I think you're overestimating the extra time involved with relatively tiny increases in distance. Only 200ms for data to travel to the other side of the world and back to put things in perspective. But I could easily be wrong about that.

I see the biggest challenge to be in leaving enough headroom on the connectors. If they don't get that right, then you'll need a new case every pci generation which seems like a missed opportunity

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MaximumMike

>> Saying that Christine doesn't let you choose your motherboard is a flawed argument since effectively the case is the motherboard. Christine is about moving past motherboards in the way we currently think about them.

That's absolutely wrong. Christine hasn't redesigned the concept of a motherboard. Or made any radical changes to PC architecture. I promise you Razer doesn't have the money to afford the kind of computer scientists and engineers who can redesign how computers work. Christine will still use basically the same components as any other PC. It will still have a motherboard which can only be far far inferior to the ATX format. If you care to show otherwise, you have my interest.

>> As for latency, I'm not an electrical engineer, but I think you're overestimating the extra time involved with relatively tiny increases in distance. Only 200ms for data to travel to the other side of the world and back to put things in perspective.

But with microprocessors it is nanoseconds that matter, not milliseconds. Electricity can move about 1 ft per nanosecond. With that in perspective, it becomes easier to see how a few inches can make a big difference.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Oh, It's TOTALLY Less modular than current computers and it's easy to prove

Just show me the 10 most popular Video cards "currently" being sold or "currently" planning on being sold in Christine modules

JUST DO IT!

Too hard?

Then just list the Top 5 hardware manufacturers who intend to jump onboard this failboat?

Yes, TOTALLY Less Modular, and easy to prove to anyone who doesn't resort to propaganda or imaginary facts to make their point

Ahem.........

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Licensing case designs will most likely turn out like licensing the Christine computer concept

FAIL!

The reason is simple
Design your own and save money!

For example, if the Mini ITX form factor were licensed instead of simply being standardized, the rest of the computer industry would simply design a form factor a half a mm shorter than the licensed form factor to save money

Why pay others to do the same as what everyone else does for free?

It makes absolutely no sense

It's like taking a free copy of Linux and designing a new mouse cursor and then trying to license the new improved Linux design

I don't even want what these guys are smoking, and besides, I'd probably have to pay a licensing fee to smoke it

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LatiosXT

Because you as a manufacturer could save money by sacking your engineering department and instead license designs from someone else. Engineers design cases (with some artists probably for other creative input), engineers cost a lot more than laborers who's only job is to input stuff in a CNC machine.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

Or save even more by copying cases already on the market that are unlicensed

Again, why pay for a license for something you can get anywhere without a license?

They have NOTHING unique or of added value to what is already available for less money

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LatiosXT

You still have to add a facade otherwise someone will sue you for copying. Which you still have to pay someone do do that. I'd wager that position would be $20/hour + benefits. If you're selling a case at $80 + 10% cut for licensing fees (so like $8?), you have to sell at least 3 cases an hour before the base wage is cheaper. I'm almost certain that's a pretty fast rate for cases.

Otherwise I would see copies and knock offs of well known case manufacturers on Newegg. Maybe might be a thing in China, but you know, it's China.

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MaximumMike

>>They have NOTHING unique or of added value to what is already available for less money

I wholeheartedly agree.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

However,

It might be argued that Christine is Unique, like the rock I found in my back yard is unique, but it provides no added value or benefit to what is already available