Dropping Support for Windows XP Could Drive Users to Chromebooks

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bonus45

Just a brought a refurb Chromebook for $150. Dang I love this thing. Probably a return because someone went cheap and then discovered it won't run Word or Excel.

Granted it's not going to replace my desktop rig but after using it I would never ever consider buying one of those cheap, slow, and bloated $300 - $400 Windows laptops. This has got an SSD, it's fast, and it doesn't have a zillion stupid background services doing who the heck knows what. Turns on in a instant and just works.

When my mom's laptop croaks she is definitely getting one of these.

Only downside is of course Google totally owns me now. I figure it's totally a rigged game - between Google, Microsoft, Apple, and the NSA we're all hosed anyway.

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dominiclolmsted

I still don't get the whole point of a Chromebook. It can't do anything more than an android phone or tablet and definitely can't compare to a full fledged OS. Plus they really aren't that much cheaper than a regular computer and are generally more than an android tablet. More importantly unless you're always near an internet connection, you are severely limited in functionality even more so than an android phone or tablet because they usually have cellular coverage. So again, what's the point....waste of money if you ask me.

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vig1lant3

And I'm predicting that after any surge in Chromebook sales, there will also be a surge in returns, and sales of used Chromebooks on eBay.

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thematejka

I'd take a $300 AMD APU-powered laptop any day. It comes with Windows and carries full functionality. I'm still running mine after 3 years, works great. I doubt a chromebook could stack up

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Bdiddytampa

I like Chromebooks, I think they are great. Light, cheap, and easy to use... but... There are so many great full fledged laptops out there for around the same price :-/ I've never been much of a mobile power computer sort, I was using an XP netbook up until about a year ago lol. My replacement was less than $300 (on sale, but there are always great deals if you are willing to hunt) an Ivy Bridge i3, 4 GB of RAM, 500 GB HDD, 14 inch screen, and it was a HUGE upgrade (ASUS X501A I think). For about the same price as a Chromebook, and I can use it whenever for whatever... Chromebooks, as great as they are for certain people, won't be on my purchase list, there are just too many competing products out there that are much more flexible.

My mother though, wasn't in the market for a new laptop :-/ and she has an XP netbook as well. Easy solution, installed Linux, Xubuntu. She loves it, no money spent :-)

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jbitzer

I don't know about this. Unless you're using it in the same way thin clients used to be, basically just as a portal to your own servers, I don't see much business use for a chromebook.

A surface pro tablet maybe a better but costlier option.

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Baer

If they do go that way many will not be happy as that is a major downgrade.
Chromebooks do have a place, those that just want to surf the web and get e mails and a few simple other tasks as cheaply as possible and who do not mind always having to have a net connection.
The few that I have seen were mostly bought by those that had no idea that they were buying anything but a normal inexpensive laptop and who, for the most part were quite disappointed with it.

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wkwilley2

Most people who are clinging on to XP are either Die hard XP fanboys and will likely still not abandon the platform, or fall into the other catagory where tablets or chromebooks would be more than capable and handing what they do on a PC (Web Browsing, Email, Office type apps).

I know a handful of people that still have XP on desktops that were new when XP launched, in their case, a Chromebook would be an upgrade

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USraging

Application support is another reason.

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wkwilley2

Too true. For home users though, I haven't seen this be an issue. For business and enterprise, it could be more of a challenge.

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LatiosXT

I've purchased laptops in Chromebook's price range which were very useable for what a Chromebook is aiming at plus more. If someone wants a cheap computer to replace their XP machine, they'll get something that retains the functionality as much as possible.

So sure, maybe there will be a surge of Chromebook sales... followed by a surge of returns when people realize they can't do some things that the internet alone can't do.

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Innomasta

Until it features a more intuitive OS and better offline support, the Chromebook will remain a niche product.

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SliceAndDice

Go out in the street and conduct interviews asking people if they've ever considered buying a chromebook and 9 out of 10 will ask " What's a chromebook?" We know all about them because we're geeks. I saw them at my local Staples store and they were on the display that was furthest from the front door. The first tablet you walk up to in the store is a Surface followed by an android, then a kindle, then the chromebook.

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Evan Evans

I run a small local IT shop.
I have moved over about 10 xp boxes/laptops to linux so far this year.
Although it doesn't immediately hurt Microsoft's bottom line, the more people get comfortable with linux, the more it could hurt Microsoft in the future.

The most modern machine was a Vista laptop that got a Linux Mint install and the customer LOVES their computer now.

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froggz

Yuck..this is one google product I was hoping it would never succeed. I get that a computer shouldn't be an island onto itself, but it shouldn't be a parasite either. That's what Chromebooks represent to me, a computer that can't live without it's host. In this case the user's internet identity and connectivity to Google.

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fung0

ChromeOS wouldn't have a ghost of a chance if Microsoft hadn't screwed the pooch with Windows 8. The fact that users are seriously considering alternatives like ChromeOS and GNU/Linux shows that Windows' hold on the market is now weaker than it has been at any time in the past 20 years.

Microsoft has particularly dropped the ball on Windows XP support. Windows XP clearly serves a vast audience, yet it's being abandoned in an effort to force undemanding users into a needless upgrade. Unfortunately for Microsoft, the logical upgrade from Windows XP is NOT Windows 8. Win8 requires spending big money for new hardware, and demands re-learning operations that XP users are already comfortable with... in exchange for no meaningful new capability. (Email: check. Web browser: check. Support for Office 2003: uncertain...)

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John B Sayles

I respectfully disagree. XP had a very nice run, but...it's over. There is some new hardware that simply won't run on XP. And it's time to come in out of the cold and upgrade to something with modern security. I get it that some people are simply Luddites (ironically) and hate change of any kind. Ok, good luck with that. But the ones who really *need* to change are: every bank on the planet. They are still running ancient ATM's under XP, which is just great until something breaks...and then we, the public, are screwed...again.

As programmers/geeks/nerds we always hope that the next release of the Operating System is the last, perfect and bug-free. All of our dreams fulfilled, all our anxieties tranquilized. But if Microsoft did that, it would go broke, and we would be without any support. So we look forward to the next release, even if it has *some* bugs, as long as it has *enhancements*.

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thematejka

"In this case the user's internet identity and connectivity to Google."

That is exactly what Google wants, which is partly why I will never get a Chromebook. It is an insidious marketing tactic - shaping the person's identity the way Google wants to so they can create a Goggle-centric consumer.