Digital Storm Bolt Review

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jedisamurai

Why of course! Replace that expensive $200.00 game system with a much, much cheaper $2000.00 PC! And then you can enjoy paying more money for the life of the machine to play games at slightly better resolutions and horrifically choppy frame-rates for the low, low price of another $500.00 every time there's a faster graphics card released! I mean, who WOULDN'T want to spend more on their PC than a car?

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PCWolf

My 10 cents

Any Micro PC that cannot be upgraded with a New Graphics Cards will become that same outdated console in a few years. Look at Laptops & Tablets for proof of this fact. They have less of a life span than consoles do simply because they cant upgrade their graphics & they get too old to do anything. Since it can hold a GTX 690, it has a Future of more than 5 yrs. But that 500w PSU is pushing it. Would feel better if it had a External 750w instead of that Mc'weaksauce 500w internal one.

Also, the lack of a Horizontal Mode is a Deal Breaker for me. I cant place this thing on top of my Flat Screen HDTV. & I don't want it on the floor. It's vertical Only mode means it wont go in the Entertainment Cabinet. I will just have to stick with my big Bulky 40lb Media Center Case.

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Drew7

I wouldn't want to place any PC on TOP of my flat screen... My 10 cents! LOL!!

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Schbemb

I'm not sure the PC can make an assault on the living room at these prices! An ibuypower Revolt appears better value and better suited to a living room environment.

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Ninjawithagun

"Since both boxes use similarly clocked GeForce GTX 680s we’re a bit confused. The only plausible explanation is driver maturity, but even with that, it’s tough to explain."

THe delta in graphics performance most likely has to do with the fact that the power supply in the Tiki is of a lower wattage and thus output is a bit more limited when heavy graphics processing is in progress. The Nvidia Kepler cards use a mode called "GPU Boost" which is similar to how Intel's "Turbo Boost" mode. When in boost mode, the graphics card draws additional power from the 12V rail(s) on the power supply. In the case of the Tike, there may be a limitation in this additional boost that ends up equating to a lower score in certain games which may rely on the GPU Boost in order to attain a higher frame rate during gameplay. It's just my suspicion of why two similarly GPU equipped systems would have such a large difference in frame rates with certain games. Other contributing factors that could cause a major difference is if one system is running a GPU optimization program such as EVGA's Precision software which allows for the user to specifically configure desired max frame rates and turn on/off the Nvidia Adaptive VSync Technology setting. Both of these settings can adversely effect frame rates and overall gameplay quality. The differences can also be seen in min/max framerates when benchmarking :)

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Ninjawithagun

Gordon, could you please re-verify the graphics card spec of the Digital Storm you tested. By the scores in the benchmarks, it appears that the card that was part of the test configuration in the Storm was actually a GTX690 or GTX Titan and not a GTX680. The reason why I say this is because all the scores are only slightly lower for all benchmarks versus the GTX690 in the Zero Point reference system. SInce a GTX690 is essentially two GTX680 2GB cards on a single PCB, it would be logical that the benchmark scores of the Zero Point system would be much higher vs. a single GTX680. Other than that, thanks for the review! I was thinking about buying a Digital Storm equipped with a Intel Core i7 3770K and either a GTX690 or GTX Titan. I don't mind the chassis noise from the graphics card fan as I am always wearing a gaming headset anyways :-)