Digital Storm Black Ops HailStorm Review

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mnappi

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aferrara50

I don't see how this rig got a 9. It only has 16gb of slow ram, a mediocre motherboard, and a mediocre watercooling setup. I suppose I'm spoiled with my setup, but for the money they don't give you much. When you're spending that much you might as well spend the extra $2K-3K for a true high end setup that doesn't give crap temps.

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Brechan

Am I missing some thing here?

As far as I can see; Digital Storm is a completely different company than AVADirect, as seen by these links

http://www.digitalstormonline.com/gamingdesktops.asp

 

http://www.avadirect.com/

 

So why is Maximum PC comparing their "Zero Point" PC to an AVADirect PC; shouldn't the comparison be between the "Zero Point" PC and the Digital Storm Hailstorm PC?

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nedwards

Sorry, looks like we forgot to change the column title in the benchmark chart. The numbers are for the Digital Storm.

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nbrowser

All I can say is, time for new Zero Point Machines.......

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Peanut Fox

Why are they running the GPU loop in series?  They couldn't spend an extra 10 bucks on 2 fittings?

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triclops41

can't find the link, but putting GPUs in series was shown not to matter for temps.  Basically, if the flow rate is fast enough (which if it isn't, then you have other bigger problems), then the temps stabilize and it doesn't matter.

 

but really, we at least need some comments from maxpc regarding noise would be pretty crucial, even if the gear to give us acoustical readings is not available.

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Eoraptor

Well, that's somewhat in line with what I've priced. I spent the weekend piecing together an "if I won the lottery" machine on newegg with dual SLI and the same chip on air cooling, and with an MS OS it came in a few sheckles over 5 grand. Throw in custom water cooling (or TE cooling) and a third SLI and while this is still a bit rich, it's not horribly above what you'd pay to put it together yourself.

But honestly, I've heard from most reviewers that these chips are starting to hit the point of diminishing returns, and that the boost you'll get is at best 5% over 2600's real world. (which is probab ly why most people have been rocking 2600's for a year now, right?)

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Peanut Fox

From the real world benchmarks I've seen this seems to be the case.  The core efficacy is up, but the extra two cores don't seem to be used in most programs, so the performance gain isn't a large as what I think the extra cost is worth.  They're still good chips though, and I think they are fairly priced.  Once support for more cores starts to take off I think we will see much more performance out of these parts.