Dell Unaffected by Scroogled Campaign, Joins the Chromebook Movement

17

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

wintercoder

No. Thanks.

avatar

AFDozerman

I think I'm gonna strip down a puppylinux distro and install Firefox and sell "foxbooks".

Who's in?

avatar

TheITGuy

They at least care about your privacy. I'll order one!

avatar

AFDozerman

Ha ha. Well, now all I need is some good hardware. I wonder if a few of those 24 core server laptops are avaliable?

avatar

macmooda

That actually sounds like a wicked good idea!!! Can I work for you??

avatar

AFDozerman

I can't imagine it would be bad enough that I would need help if I ever did it. I mean, I don't understand puppy, but for Linux Mint, download Mint, sudo apt-get remove KDE, then set up a script that loads FF on startup. Boom, foxbook.

Actually, then again, maybe this would be worth doing...

avatar

DonPMitchell

As they should, Dell makes business decisions, not ideological or "fanboy" decisions. I don't like chromebooks, and I think Google is locking people into a lame, closed, surveilled platform. But it's reasonable for Dell to see if they can make some money off it.

avatar

Random

Maybe Microsoft can fix this with another clever ad campaign? I've got it... they could call it ScroogleDelled. If your new laptop can't run Microsoft office then you just got ScroogleDelled!

avatar

vrmlbasic

3-5 years ago the Netbooks were all the rage and MPC mocked them, and rightly so, incessantly.

Little did we know that all the netbook had to do to earn MPC's undying praise, and unjustly so, was strip out a huge part of its usefulness and be branded with Google's brandname.

avatar

tekknyne

+1 for the good razzin

avatar

firefox91

I still have a netbook and I love it. It is far more flexible in use than any Chromebook for me. I slapped a 120GB SSD (16GB... really?) and maxed out the RAM. It runs quick, I can load just about anything I want on it (within reason), and I have plenty of space to store movies for the road. I'm just not a fan of any cloud-based system where I have to store my files on a server controlled by someone else. Sure they say it is safe and secure, but many a hacker has proved that to not be the case.

avatar

gordonung

I actually did the same with a Netbook at home and it's not bad. The screen is too low res for a lot of apps though but it does work. It doesn't erase how horribly slow those Atom parts were though.

What would be interesting is a NetBook II with a Bay Trail part, Windows Post 8 and a slightly higher res screen for $300. I don't that'll happen though and in some ways, we have that today with the Asus Transformer T100. OEMs just have to give up on the tablet functionatliy of Win8 which is going nowhere fast and focus on what people still want: a fast, low cost desktop experience.

 

I do disagree about the security issue though. Chromebooks are more resistant because there's nothing stored on them. If my Chromebook was confiscated at the border going into Whateverstan, I wouldn't be as concerned if authorities confiscated my notebook with the 500GB of data on it evn if all of the data was encrypted. 

avatar

Paul_Lilly

Righhhhht. There's a titanic difference between pointing out there's a market for Chromebooks (and covering press releases) versus "undying praise." Obviously power users or anyone who needs the full functionality of a traditional laptop need not apply, but for basic tasks, especially in education, Chromebooks are an economical option worth exploring.

For further reading:

Samsung Chromebook Review (7/10 verdict)
Samsung Series 5 3G Chromebook Review (7/10 verdict)
Chromebook Pixel Review (7/10 verdict)

avatar

vrmlbasic

I don't remember MPC treating the netbook so kindly. How was the netbook not at least as suitable for basic tasks/educational tasks as is the Chromebook?

avatar

gordonung

Actually, Netbooks did better than Chromebooks even though we had a fundamental disagreement here in our office about them. Look up reviews of the Netbooks and the verdicts they received vs. the vast majority of Chromebooks. 

And I agree with Paul and have long looked at Chromebooks the same way: With a Chromebook (back in the Atom days anyway) you never thought you could do much. With Netbooks and their full service OS, many thought they could run Photoshop while doing five other things. I don't know a single person who ever thought his or her Netbook was great. Hell, they couldn't even run Youtube without dropping frames at low res.

 

avatar

Paul_Lilly

The difference there is that netbooks tried to be full fledged PCs. Some of the later models offered serviceable performance, but in the beginning (and for a long time thereafter), they were vastly underpowered to run Windows and its applications. Some were also pretty pricey at $350+. Especially in regard to the first wave of netbooks, asking Windows to run smoothly on a single-core CPU with 1GB of RAM and a 5400 RPM mechanical hard drive was a tall order. Just firing up a web browser was a practice in patience.

I view Chromebooks as the netbook evolved. They're inexpensive tools with more powerful hardware (SSDs are commonplace now) for people who need basic computing functionality and generally have Internet access. For $200, a grade school student can surf the web, research homework questions, type up reports via Google Docs (or even Office 365), fart around on social media sites, watch Netflix, listen to streaming music, play casual games, and so forth. Add another $50 and they get a touchscreen, too. These are responsive systems that boot up fast and don't slow to a crawl when surfing the web.

Google loses me with its "Everything you need in a laptop" tagline, at least as a blanket statement, but for $200 to $250, that's true for some groups. At the very least, there's some good value there for the right type of user(s). Beyond grade school kids, people like my mother would be Chromebook candidates -- she surfs the web, fires off emails, and prints the occasional document.

The last thing I'll point out is that the people buying Chromebooks don't seem to be suffering from buyer's remorse. Obviously that's not the case across the board, but a look at Amazon's best selling laptops show Chromebooks representing 4 out of the top 10 spots, including numbers 1 and 2. The Samsung Chromebook (No. 1) has a 4/5 star rating out of 3,641 reviews; Acer C720 Chromebook has a 4.5/5 star rating out of 185 reviews; Acer C710 Chromebook has a 3.5/5 star rating out of 70 reviews; and the HP Chromebook 14 has a 4/5 star rating out of 44 reviews. Granted there could be a fair number of regretful owners who didn't bother to rate, but typically you'll see low star ratings on items that are just plain bad or universally hated.

avatar

gc

Leaving google ecosystem not due to Scroogled but due to all the craziness that's happening with our web footprint/fingerprint information.