Dell Reaffirms Commitment to Project Sputnik, Launches a New Ubuntu Laptop for Developers

22

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

legionera

"Pricing for the new system remains at $1,550"

Linux guyes, prepare your empty wallets!!!

avatar

Terrix

It may surprise you that same laptop with Windows costs more (for the Window's license).

This is for professionals, meaning people who normally buy Macbook Pro's or high end business line machines. ~1,500 for a good Ultrabook that is thinner then a MacBook Pro with SSD isn't much.

avatar

Xenux

Normally I try to refrain from insulting people on forums but you are such an idiotic windows cheerleader fanboi. Just because someone chooses to use a linux distribution doesn't automatically mean that they're poor.

avatar

legionera

Well, prove it, confident linux fangirl. Oh, you can't? That's too bad.

avatar

PCLinuxguy

While Linux is not Unix, one might say that Apple users (MacBooks, iMacs, and Mac Pros) could be examples, as they spend quite a large amount of money on non-Windows based systems.

avatar

AFDozerman

What about Ubuntu makes it intrinsically better for developers? Generally speaking, the number and quality of programming resources available on Windows trumps Linux. Is this specifically trying to get people to develop "for" linux? If so, I think it's a great thing.

avatar

Terrix

So yeah, if you were writing a .NET or Windows application, there would be some truth to that statement, but that's outside the scope of what's intended when they say "development".

The site you are on, in addition to sites like Google, Facebook, Amazon, and most applications now run in the cloud, a lot of today's development is done on web applications. Almost all of it runs Linux, or some variant of BSD. This is the development being hinted at, someone running Ubuntu can be running the same platform as their server (exact same if they use Ubuntu Server) and have all the build/deployment tools native without having to run a local VM or push out to a remote test environment. That's where a lot of the work is today instead of native client apps that run on the desktop, apps are developed to run in a browser and the back end is a rock solid platform made for serving multiple users without the overhead of a GUI that can run in a low cost virtual instance (so Linux).

The laptop itself has a few tools included for running services you would have deployed in your production and QA servers on your local hardware for dev testing. Things like Hadoop, Apache (with support for Python, PHP, Ruby, Java, etc), rabbitMQ, postgreSQL, etc.

Likewise, the other large area in development is mobile, the most popular Android is Linux based, and all the development tools are available for Linux. iPhone developers likewise tend to use Mac's with XCode to code in Objective C.

avatar

H1N1theI

Linux has all the good development tools.*

E.G. GCC, clang, and mingw,for porting to windows, both of which are actually compliant in the C++11/0x standard.**

Most developers use Linux because it's rather easy to go from Linux to windows, but much, much harder to get from windows to Linux.***

*Except C#, I believe, we do have mono, but that's not as native as the .NET framework, and what do you expect from a MS-created language?

**Visual Studios is actually horrible, it doesn't follow the C++ standards, and uses special shit, also, it forces you to use the MS runtime for some bloody reason.

***That's because you can just target windows with mingw-gcc, provided that you have libraries that would work on Windows, which most FOSS libraries do. Windows locks you into this dll hell when the rest of the world just uses lib files.

avatar

PCLinuxguy

Yes, this program is designed to get developers onto the Linux platform to work on developing 'for' Linux as a whole. Drivers, all the way to porting progams over to make them native, kernel compiling, etc.

avatar

wumpus

Except that the moment a developer digs into what he needs to develop for Linux, he will notice the whole Mir/Wayland fiasco and realize that the first thing he needs to do is wipe Ubuntu and install Mint/Scientific Linux/anything but Ubuntu (this isn't a big issue yet, but expect it to be by the time he is ready to ship anything).

The other issue is that Dell sells crappy overpriced hardware which presumably allows you to buy large lots that take the same windows image (otherwise why would anyone buy from them). In the Linux world, this and $3 gets you coffee at Starbucks. Linux is perfectly happy booting images from other computers.

They will still sell a bundle of them to pointy-haired idiots controlling purchasing decisions.

avatar

H1N1theI

I'll toast to that "uninstall Ubuntu". But actually, Wayland is very very nice, it includes Xorg emulation and some neat features.

avatar

AFDozerman

Ubuntu is bad? Well, I guess I lose some tech cred for not using mint DE, then. :/

avatar

PCLinuxguy

Just use what feels comfortable and works for you. My servers run Debian and CentOS, but at home I use Ubuntu. Mint is based on Ubuntu, so you're not really gaining/losing out on cred.

avatar

AFDozerman

Yeah, what I said was a poorly phrased joke aimed at those who have judged me before for using Mint based on Ubuntu as opposed to Mint based on pure Debian (Mint DE) because of the "muh freedums" argument. Honestly, I have no problem using the proprietary bits mixed in with Ubuntu, and since Ubuntu is just an evolution of Debian, I can only gain from using it.

avatar

AFDozerman

Ubuntu is bad? Well, I guess I lose some tech cred for not using mint DE, then. :/

avatar

AFDozerman

Great.

avatar

Gikero

I didn't realize that 13.10 wasn't a LTS release. Was surprised to see 12.04 on it. Nice system, price is a little high for me.

avatar

PCLinuxguy

Yes, 12.04 is an LTS. The Long Term Support releases are deployed every 2 years. The last LTS was 10.04 and the following will be 14.04.

I do agree that the price is high, but then it's also running the latest hardware (Intel Haswell, and the Haswell IGP) and equipped like an ultrabook with a fairly good sized SSD (not some measly 60-120GB model), so it's par for the course, but I would like to see a couple hundred knocked off since it's not being hammered with the Windows Tax

avatar

vrmlbasic

That this laptop includes only the good-for-nothing Intel iGPU shouldn't be a justification for why the price is so high. Luckily gaming on Linux is already a losing proposition so the lack of a gaming-capable GPU isn't too painful. Though Intel's GPU is just flat-out incapable in all regards.

Maybe that's the "grand scheme", by including a crap GPU Intel deters developers from creating code designed for HSA with the advantages of an integrated GPU...aka what AMD is shooting for.

avatar

H1N1theI

Intel iGPUs are actually great for development work, interestingly enough. The quick-sync + a few custom packages makes video editing quicker than that of a standalone GPU.

And also, what the hell are you talking about? HSA is not the future, it's a regression to the CPU and GPU sharing RAM.

avatar

Gikero

I had it in my head that .04 were short term support and .10 was LTS. Taking a second to think about now, that just doesn't make sense. Ha ha! I goofed.

avatar

PCLinuxguy

Almost :-) every other .04 is an LTS, as 13.04 and 11.04 weren't LTS releases.