Column: To the NSA Your Data Is Valuable Ore

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jbitzer

Being stationed at the NSA was the final nail in the coffin for me making my decision to exit the military. They made me sick just listening to the orientation and how they focus on how neat what they do is, not whether it's morally right. They convince the drones that the work they are doing is necessary and completely within the law, and because we're the good guys, what we do is always the right thing.

TLDR, Screw the NSA.

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karolus_Brasil

2013 is 1984, Big Brother showed his face! I agree that use of data collected (Review) by American intelligence services have so far not led the U.S. government to effectively stop any real threat (see September 11, 2001: agencies knew about the plan, but gave no ... due importance. Then, what is the usefulness of collecting and analyzing data? Whether, when deciding (because the machine does not decide), the governmet (NSA, FBI, CIA etc ...) made ​​the decision to ignore the threat. Logically, Edward Snowden should not have revealed all secret or top secret documents in his possession; for if revealed everything, the U.S. government would send a DRONE (UCAV)to kill him; so he wisely in homeopathic doses will reveal the secrets to also safeguard himself.

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Leo Scott

One significant thing the article failed to point out while the author was patting himself on the back. Only 1% of the documents taken by Snowden have been released to the public. Now they may not have anything interesting in them, but the NSA does seem worried.

Another baloney point of the article is that corporations collect and store the same data. The corporations do not have the power to arrest, prosecute or incarcerate you. They are not bound by the 4th amendment, but one wonders if the NSA is either.

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vrmlbasic

Why do we even need the NSA?

What does it do that we so desperately needed done and couldn't get done without it?

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Renegade Knight

Corporation do collect, store, and sell a lot of the same data. The reasons are different. They want to make money. It would be fair to point out that the NSA has a different purpose and thus collects different information as well. But you can't say there isn't overlap, nor that the methods don't have things in common.

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John Pombrio

Agreed. Once a week, a new revelation about the NSA occurs. The PRISM leak was simply testing the waters that the two newspapers involved could safely publish without getting the hammer thrown down on them. The latest is about the number of cell phone tracked by the NSA overseas and was released just last week.

No, there is plenty more to come about the NSA.

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vrmlbasic

The government has no business with our data. It's plain to see that they can't stop threats, not even with explicit warnings from foreign and domestic intelligence services, so the data mining is a benefitless & illegal invasion of our privacy.

Why is it that so many "thwarted" terrorist attacks were aided by the Feds? If the wannabe terrorist was unable to get his hands on weapons from actual terrorist groups, which he obviously was if he got his C4 or whatever from the feds in their "sting" operation, then he wasn't really a serious terror threat.

How come we weren't overrun with heinous acts of terrorism before we had internet data mining, or even the internet?

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aundae

"We absolutely need these processors to scan Internet traffic for malware and to speed network packets to their destinations." Do we *really* need to do these things, or are they just nice things to accomplish where these processors accomplish them?

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Renegade Knight

No we don't need them. We just want them.

I'd rather not suffer lag on games, and buffering on Netflix. I don't care if my email takes 10 minutes to get to it's destination.

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squarebab

The private sector has been spying on us for years? Well. I guess that makes it OK now for the government to do it also. I mean, if everybody's doing it, it must be OK, right?

I have one question: Is it wrong for one person to use countermeasures to stop being spied upon? Or will be OK only when everyone is doing it?

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Biceps

Why are all your articles 250 words or less? It always seems like you are just getting started... and it is over. I see longer reader comments everyday.

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jbitzer

Most of Gordon's articles that are reposts from the magazine come from his "from the editor" column on the first page. It is usually just a small blurb about an overview of what's going on in tech, and is about the length of a 2.5 inch column page length.

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r3dd4wg

That was all circumstantial evidence. We now have someone who has come forward with top secret/classified documents from the source itself demonstrating, in vivid detail, how we are all surveilled.

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vrmlbasic

+1

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Biceps

This